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Author Topic: A-Z of AVIONICS  (Read 448881 times)

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #525 on: 02/03/2007 19:12:38 »
Macrophage


 derived from blood monocytes:   
- about 6% of all WBCs; largest leukocyte 12-15 micrometers; nucleus shape varies from kidney-shaped to horseshoe-shaped, but always indented; lighter staining than lymphocytes
 
- cytoplasm without granules and stains pale blue-gray
 
- in contrast to neutrophils, are relatively long-lived
 
- are distributed throughout connective tissue and around the basement tissue of small blood vessels
 
- monocytes are phagocytic; when monocytes leave bloodstream they rapidly transform to macrophages that are very actively phagocytic ingesting bacteria, dead cells, tissue debris; also stimulate antibody production by lymphocytes.
 
- defend against pathogens which reside within host cells.


from:   http://www.biotech.um.edu.mt/home_pages/chris/Hematology1/Hematologyhtml/WBC4.htm

« Last Edit: 02/03/2007 19:14:34 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #526 on: 02/03/2007 19:37:54 »
Nothing
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Nothing is the lack or absence of anything. Colloquially, however, the term is often used to describe a particularly unimpressive thing, event, or object.

In mathematics, nothing does not have a technical meaning. It could be said that a set contains "nothing" if and only if it is the empty set, in which case its cardinality (or size) is zero. In other words, the word "nothing" is an informal term for an empty set.

In physics, the word nothing is not used in any technical sense. A region of space is called a vacuum if it does not contain any matter. But it can contain physical fields. In fact, it is practically impossible to construct a region of space which contains no matter or fields, since gravity cannot be blocked and all objects at a non-zero temperature radiate electromagnetically. However, supposing such a region existed, it would still not be "nothing", since it has properties and a measurable existence as part of the quantum-mechanical vacuum.

The concept of "nothing" has been studied throughout history by philosophers and theologians; many have found that careful consideration of the notion can easily lead to the logical fallacy of reification. (If one does not believe that nothing is no thing.) The understanding of "nothing" varies widely between cultures, especially between Western and Eastern cultures and philosophical traditions. For instance, emptiness, unlike "nothingness," is considered a state of mind in Buddhism .
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #527 on: 02/03/2007 20:58:08 »
Oh my God!
(for a Big scientific achievement)

Ornithorhynchus



The Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is a semi-aquatic mammal endemic to eastern Australia and Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young.
It is the sole living representative of its family (Ornithorhynchidae) and genus (Ornithorhynchus), though a number of related species have been found in the fossil record.

The bizarre appearance of this egg-laying, duck-billed mammal baffled naturalists when it was first discovered, with some considering it an elaborate fraud. It is one of the few venomous mammals; the male Platypus has a spur on the hind foot which delivers a poison capable of causing severe pain to humans. The unique features of the Platypus make it an important subject in the study of evolutionary biology and a recognizable and iconic symbol of Australia; it has appeared as a mascot at national events and is featured on the reverse of the Australian 20-cent coin.

Until the early 20th century it was hunted for its fur, but it is now protected throughout its range. Although captive breeding programs have had only limited success and the Platypus is vulnerable to the effects of pollution, it is not under any immediate threat.

from wikipedia:   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platypus   


« Last Edit: 02/03/2007 21:06:19 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #528 on: 02/03/2007 21:26:06 »
Parabola
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


In mathematics, the parabola (from the Greek: παραβολή) (IPA pronunciation: /pəˈrab(ə)lə/) is a conic section generated by the intersection of a right circular conical surface and a plane parallel to a generating straight line of that surface. A parabola can also be defined as locus of points in a plane which are equidistant from a given point (the focus) and a given line (the directrix).

A particular case arises when the plane is tangent to the conical surface. In this case, the intersection is a degenerate parabola consisting of a straight line.

The parabola is an important concept in abstract mathematics, but it is also seen with considerable frequency in the physical world, and there are many practical applications for the construct in engineering, physics, and other domains.



A Parabola Thingy !!
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #529 on: 02/03/2007 21:47:29 »
Quintuplet!

Science of twins...Medical Twinology?
« Last Edit: 02/03/2007 21:50:25 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #530 on: 02/03/2007 23:11:07 »
R for RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR...aren't those quintuplets cute ?



Remote control
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


A remote control is an electronic device used for the remote operation of a machine.

The term remote control can be also referred to as "remote" or "controller" when abbreviated. It has been known by many other names as well, such as the "clicker," etc. Commonly, remote controls are used to issue commands from a distance to televisions or other consumer electronics such as stereo systems and DVD players. Remote controls for these devices are usually small wireless handheld objects with an array of buttons for adjusting various settings such as television channel, track number, and volume. In fact, for the majority of modern devices with this kind of control, the remote contains all the function controls while the controlled device itself only has a handful of essential primary controls. Most of these remotes communicate to their respective devices via infrared (IR) signals and a few via radio signals. They are usually powered by small AAA or AA size batteries.









Guess what these are ?...go on...have a guess !!...tricky eh ?...well I don't know !!




« Last Edit: 02/03/2007 23:14:23 by neilep »
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #531 on: 02/03/2007 23:25:50 »
Spirit of Saint Louis


Vue du Ryan Spirit of Saint Louis. Première traversée de l'Atlantique par Charles Lindbergh les 20 et 21 mai 1927 (durée du vol: 33h 30mn).
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #532 on: 02/03/2007 23:38:40 »
Toyoichi Tanaka

- Smart Gels

Polymer gels that can expand or contract by up to 1000 times in volume.
According to TECHTALK published by the MIT News Office, "Smart gels or polymer gels are a class of materials that expand or contract when triggered by tiny changes in temperature, light, a solvent or other stimulus."

Polymer gels have the ability to make large but reversible changes in volume allowing for the invention of smart gels that could deliver various agents and materials at specific events for countless purposes. For example, uses for smart gels could include cleaning up oil spills, creating cosmetics adaptable to skin pH, or even serving as miniature artificial valves and muscles.

Toyoichi Tanaka Father of Smart Gels
Toyoichi Tanaka was born in Nagaoka-city, Japan in 1946. He received his BS in (1968), MS (1970) and DSc (1973) in physics from the University of Tokyo.

He joined the MIT physics faculty in 1975. Toyoichi Tanaka married Tomoko Tahira in 1970.

In 1992, Toyoichi Tanaka co-founded GelMed Inc and its sister company, Gel Sciences Inc. He also co-founded Buyo-Buyo, Inc.

Toyoichi Tanaka was the winner of the 38th Toray Science and Technology Prize from the Toray Science Foundation in Japan and the 1994 Inoue Prize for Science. He was awarded the Vinci d'Excellence in France for his work in 1993.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #533 on: 03/03/2007 03:20:23 »
Those babies are Gorgeous!!! Poor brother he is going to be brutalized...4 Girls against the 1 boy! NO FAIR I say!!! LOL


Ultracentrifuge = a highspeed centrifuge for segragating microscopic and sub-microscopic materials to determine the sizes and molecular weights of colloidal and other small particles.
 


Offline Karen W.

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #535 on: 03/03/2007 12:57:48 »
Wavellite =  N. { after W. Wavell (?- 1829), An English Physician who discovered it} an orthorhombic hydrous phosphate of aluminun, vitreous and translucent
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #536 on: 03/03/2007 14:02:21 »
Xyphophorus variatus variatus (Platy)


Xyphophorus helleri


funny name:      xyphos=sword           phorus=carrier
« Last Edit: 03/03/2007 14:25:38 by iko »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #537 on: 03/03/2007 14:36:04 »
Yagi (antenna) A VHS or UHF Directional antenna array in which a basic dipole antenna is supplimented by several parallel  reflector and director elements: widely used or television reception in weak- signal areas.
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #538 on: 03/03/2007 14:47:37 »
FRANK J. ZAMBONI (1901-1988)

Ice resurfacing machine

In 1949, Frank Zamboni invented the machine used today in skating rinks all over the world to clean and polish the ice surface on the spot.
Born in 1901, Zamboni was a natural mechanic and innovative thinker. He moved to Southern California at the age of 21, to work in auto repair at his elder brother's garage, but soon decided to enter the refrigeration business. At that time, the dairy and produce industries relied heavily on ice for storage and transport, so Zamboni and another brother built a factory to produce block ice.

Over the years, the refrigeration technology used in warehouses and boxcars made great advances, thanks to inventors like W. H. Carrier and Frederick McKinley Jones. Never one to be left in the cold, Zamboni found a new venue for his expertise. In 1939, he, his brother and a cousin built Iceland Skating Rink in Paramount, California --- at 20,000 sq. ft., one of the largest rinks in the country. Zamboni soon added a domed roof over the rink: the dome helped defend the ice surface from the California sun, but could not prevent everyday defects in the ice, namely the chipping and gouging that inevitably result from use.

To renew the ice surface, a team of three or four workers had to scrape the ice with a tractor, then shovel away the shavings, hose down and squeegee the surface, and wait for the ice to set again: the process took over an hour, each time. In 1942, Zamboni began to transform a tractor into a unified ice surface scraper and smoother, one that could resurface the ice at one pass.
After seven years of experiments, Zamboni succeeded: an adjustable blade in a frame behind the machine shaved the ice smooth; the resultant shavings were then swept up and conveyed into a large holding tank; an apparatus at the back of the resurfacer rinsed and squeegeed the ice as the machine moved ahead, leaving a layer of water shallow enough that it bonded to the ice below almost instantly. In 1949, the "Model A Zamboni Ice Resurfacer" became both patented (#2,642,679) and marketable.

Zamboni's best help in marketing his invention came from Olympic skater Sonja Henie. In 1950, she saw the Zamboni® in action while practicing at Paramount Iceland, and immediately ordered one for her national tour. Later, she took a Model B with her to Europe. It was not long before the Ice Capades, and then various recreational and sports skating rinks, were clamoring for a Zamboni® of their own.

As ice skating continued to rise in popularity in the 1950s and '60s, Zamboni kept improving his machines: his HD model (1964) set the standards for the industry that he singlehandedly created; the latest models (1978-present) feature a liquid-cooled engine or run on electric batteries.

Today's machines are still manufactured at Zamboni's original factory; their proving ground is still the nearby Paramount Iceland. Frank Zamboni died in 1988, but as his company looks ahead to its 50th anniversary (1999), the evidence of his success in invention can be seen around the world, from Olympic arenas to neighborhood ice rinks.
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #539 on: 03/03/2007 21:49:18 »
ADAMS APPLE
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #540 on: 03/03/2007 22:30:50 »
BASIC
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



In computer programming, BASIC (an acronym for Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code[1]) refers to a family of high-level programming languages. It was originally designed in 1963, by John George Kemeny and Thomas Eugene Kurtz at Dartmouth College, to provide access for non-science students to computers. At the time, nearly all computer use required writing custom software, which was something only scientists and mathematicians tended to do. The language (in one variant or another) became widespread on home microcomputers in the 1980s, and remains popular to this day in a handful of heavily evolved dialects.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #541 on: 03/03/2007 23:12:01 »
  CHEMISTRY
 

Offline iko

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« Last Edit: 03/06/2007 22:13:17 by iko »
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #543 on: 04/03/2007 09:21:14 »
Electromagnetic!
 

Offline Mjhavok

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #544 on: 04/03/2007 09:26:48 »
FISH (Flourescence In Situ Hybridisation)
Flavobacterium
Focal Assay
Fungal Spores
Fusarium graminearum
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #545 on: 04/03/2007 09:32:34 »
Geoponic = To toil, To till the ground , having to do with agriculture.
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #546 on: 04/03/2007 10:44:18 »
Hemophagocytosis



Perspective
Hemophagocytic Syndromes and Infection
David N. Fisman
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA


Figure 1.
Hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow of an 18-year-old woman with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. The patient visited her physician in September 1997 with pharyngitis and an elevated heterophile agglutinin titer. She was diagnosed with infectious mononucleosis, and her symptoms resolved in 2 weeks. Approximately 2 months later, she had persistent, spiking fevers and became jaundiced; her immunoglobulin (Ig) M to EBV capsid antigen was positive; and EBV capsid IgG and nuclear IgG were negative. She had pancytopenia and was hospitalized. Bone marrow evaluation revealed a hypocellular marrow, with active hemophagocytosis. The macrophage in the center of this image appears "stuffed" with phagocytosed erythrocytes. Phagocytosis of platelets and leukocytes by macrophages was also seen (not shown). The patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, steroids, and cyclosporine A, but not etoposide. Her condition worsened; she had respiratory, renal, and hepatic failure; and she died of an intracerebral hemmorhage on hospital day 34, 3 1/2 months after her initial illness.
Original photomicrograph 100 X magnification with oil immersion, courtesy of Frank Evangelista, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Photomicrograph published in Blood 1999;63:1991 and reproduced by permission of the publisher.

from:   CDC/Emerging infectious diseases    http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol6no6/fismanG1.htm


« Last Edit: 04/03/2007 10:49:32 by iko »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #547 on: 04/03/2007 14:25:06 »
Isopropyl Alcohol
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #548 on: 04/03/2007 17:50:28 »
Frederick Jones (1893-1961)   By Mary Bellis

Fred McKinley JonesFrederick McKinley Jones was one of the most prolific Black inventors ever. Frederick Jones patented more than sixty inventions, however, he is best known for inventing an automatic refrigeration system for long-haul trucks in 1935 (a roof-mounted cooling device). Jones was the first person to invent a practical, mechanical refrigeration system for trucks and railroad cars, which eliminated the risk of food spoilage during long-distance shipping trips. The system was, in turn, adapted to a variety of other common carriers, including ships. Frederick Jones was issued the patent on July 12, 1940 (#2,303,857).

Frederick Jones also invented a self-starting gas engine and a series of devices for movie projectors: adapting silent movie projectors for talking films, and developing box office equipment that delivered tickets and gave change.

Frederick Jones was born in in Covington, Kentucky near Cincinnati, Ohio on on May 17, 1893. He was a trained mechanic, a skill he learned doing military service in France during World War. His mastery of electronic devices was largely self-taught, through work experience and the inventing process.




Frederick McKinley Jones was granted more than 40 patents in the field of refrigeration. Frederick Jones' inspiration for the refrigeration unit was a conversation with a truck driver who had lost a shipment of chickens because the trip took too long and the truck's storage compartment overheated. Frederick Jones also developed an air-conditioning unit for military field hospitals and a refrigerator for military field kitchens. Frederick Jones received over 60 patents during his lifetime.





 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #549 on: 04/03/2007 19:09:59 »
Kinky hair disease  (Menke's syndrome)




Pathophysiology: As an X-linked disease, MKHD typically occurs in males who present when aged 2-3 months with loss of previously obtained developmental milestones and the onset of hypotonia, seizures, and failure to thrive.
Characteristic physical changes of the hair and facies, in conjunction with typical neurologic findings, often suggest the diagnosis. In 1988, Baerlocher and Nadal compiled the presenting signs and symptoms of 127 patients with MKHD whose cases had been reported in the medical literature up to 1985. The less distinctive appearance of very young infants with MKHD before the onset of neurodegeneration is discussed separately below. In the natural history of classic MKHD, death usually occurs by the time the individual with MKHD is aged 3 years.

Physical presentation

The scalp hair of infants with classic MKHD is short, sparse, coarse, and twisted. The hair is often less abundant and even shorter on the sides and the back of the head than on the top. The twisted strands may be reminiscent of those in steel wool cleaning pads. The eyebrows usually share the unusual appearance. Light microscopy of patient hair illustrates pathognomonic pili torti (ie, 180° twisting of the hair shaft) and often other abnormalities, including trichoclasis (ie, transverse fracture of hair shaft) and trichoptilosis (ie, longitudinal splitting of shaft). Hair tends to be lightly pigmented and may demonstrate unusual colors, such as white, silver, or grey; however, in some individuals with MKHD, the hair is pigmented normally.

The face of the individual with MKHD has pronounced jowls, with sagging cheeks and ears that often appear large. The palate tends to be high-arched, and tooth eruption is delayed. Noisy sonorous breathing is often evident. While findings on auscultation of the heart and lungs are usually unremarkable, pectus excavatum (chest deformity) is a common thoracic finding. Umbilical and/or inguinal herniae may be present. The skin often appears loose and redundant, particularly at the nape of the neck and on the trunk.

Neurologically, profound truncal hypotonia with poor head control is invariably present. Appendicular tone may be increased with thumbs held in an adducted cortical posture. Deep tendon reflexes are often hyperactive. The suck and cry are usually strong. Visual fixation and tracking are commonly impaired, while hearing is normal. Developmental skills are confined to occasional smiling and babbling in most patients with MKHD. Growth failure commences shortly after the onset of neurodegeneration and is asymmetric, with linear growth relatively preserved in comparison to weight and head circumference. Clinical diagnostic tests often produce characteristic results

much much more from e-Medicine:     http://www.emedicine.com/ped/topic1417.htm 



« Last Edit: 04/03/2007 19:15:12 by iko »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #549 on: 04/03/2007 19:09:59 »

 

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