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Author Topic: A-Z of AVIONICS  (Read 449524 times)

Offline Karen W.

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #600 on: 10/03/2007 19:20:31 »
BRONCHITUS
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #601 on: 10/03/2007 22:29:59 »
Carbon monoxide poisoning
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas that is created whenever a flame is present. Some homes have been found to have concentrations of this gas that are above the federal health standard set under the Clean Air Act.

Major Sources
Carbon monoxide is emitted by any combustion source including burning charcoal, gasoline engines running in attached garages or sheds, un-vented kerosene heaters and tobacco smoke.

Health Effects
Carbon monoxide interferes with your body's ability to use oxygen. Depending on the amount you inhale, it can affect your balance, harm your heart, make you tired and cause headaches, confusion, nausea, and dizziness. Very high levels can cause death.

from:   http://www.tpchd.org/page.php?id=60



« Last Edit: 26/03/2007 18:11:10 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #602 on: 11/03/2007 20:27:24 »
History of the Depth Charge

The depth charge or bomb is a waterproof weapon used by ships or aircraft to attack submerged submarines.

First Depth Charges
The first depth charges were developed by the British in World War I for use against German submarines or U-boats, beginning in late 1915. They were steel canisters, the size of an oil drum, filled with TNT explosives. They were dropped off the side or stern of a ship, on top of where the crew estimated the enemy submarines were. The canister sank and exploded at a depth that was preset by the use of a hydrostatic valve. The charges often did not hit the submarines but the shock of the explosions still damaged the submarines by loosening the submarine enough to create leaks and forcing the submarine to surface.




The first depth charges were not effective weapons. Between 1915 and the end of 1917, depth charges destroyed only nine U-boats. They were improved in 1918 and that year were responsible for destroying twenty-two U-boats, when depth charges were propelled through the air over distances of 100 or more yards with special cannons, increasing the damage range of the naval ships.


 

Offline iko

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« Last Edit: 26/03/2007 18:11:34 by iko »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #604 on: 11/03/2007 21:26:17 »
Follicle




http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Follicle

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Closeup of cone of Banksia serrata, with follicles having opened to release seedA follicle (from the Latin folliculus) is a term to describe a small spherical group of cells containing a cavity, and is often used as a descriptive term in biology, particularly in anatomy. Examples include:

hair follicles
ovarian follicles
lymph follicles
thyroid follicles
In botany, the term is used to describe a dry fruit which dehisces along one rupture site in order to release seeds, such as in larkspur, magnolia, banksia, peony and milkweed.




  This anatomy article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

  This botany article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Follicle"
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #605 on: 11/03/2007 21:43:24 »
« Last Edit: 26/03/2007 18:11:58 by iko »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #606 on: 11/03/2007 22:04:44 »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #607 on: 11/03/2007 23:02:00 »
Igloo


An igloo (Inuit language: iglu, Inuktitut syllabics:  "house", plural: iglooit or igluit), translated sometimes as snowhouse, is a shelter constructed from blocks of snow, generally in the form of a dome. Although igloos are usually associated with all Inuit, they were predominantly constructed by people of Canada's Central Arctic and Greenlands Thule area. Other Inuit people tended to use snow to insulate their houses which consisted of whalebone and hides. The use of snow is due to the fact that snow is an insulator (due to its low density). On the outside, temperatures may be as low as -45 C (-49 F), but on the inside the temperature may range

There were three types of igloo, all of different sizes and were used for different purposes.

The smallest of all igloos was constructed as a temporary shelter. Hunters while out on the land or sea ice camped in one of these iglooit for one or two nights.

Next in size was the semi-permanent, intermediate sized family dwelling. This usually was a single room dwelling that housed one or two families. Often there were several of these in a small area, which formed an "Inuit village".

The largest of the igloos was normally built in groups of two. One of the buildings was a temporary building constructed for special occasions, the other was built near by for living. This was constructed either by enlarging a smaller igloo or building from scratch. These could have up to five rooms and housed up to 20 people. A large igloo may have been constructed from several smaller igloos attached by their tunnels giving a common access to the outside. These were used to hold community feasts, traditional dances (see Inuit music) and Katajjaq.








 

Offline iko

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« Last Edit: 26/03/2007 18:12:24 by iko »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #609 on: 12/03/2007 00:35:32 »
Krypton

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Krypton (disambiguation).
36 bromine ← krypton → rubidium
Ar

Kr

Xe
Periodic Table - Extended Periodic Table
 
 
General
Name, Symbol, Number krypton, Kr, 36
Chemical series noble gases
Group, Period, Block 18, 4, p
Appearance colorless
 
Atomic mass 83.798(2)  gmol−1
Electron configuration [Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p6
Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 8
Physical properties
Phase gas
Density (0 C, 101.325 kPa)
3.749 g/L
Melting point 115.79 K
(-157.36 C, -251.25 F)
Boiling point 119.93 K
(-153.22 C, -244.12 F)
Triple point 115.775 K, 73.2 kPa[1]
Critical point 209.41 K, 5.50 MPa
Heat of fusion 1.64  kJmol−1
Heat of vaporization 9.08  kJmol−1
Heat capacity (25 C) 20.786  Jmol−1K−1
Vapor pressure P(Pa) 1 10 100 1 k 10 k 100 k
at T(K) 59 65 74 84 99 120
 
Atomic properties
Crystal structure cubic face centered
Oxidation states 2
Electronegativity 3.00 (Pauling scale)
Ionization energies
(more) 1st:  1350.8  kJmol−1
2nd:  2350.4  kJmol−1
3rd:  3565  kJmol−1
Atomic radius (calc.) 88  pm
Covalent radius 110  pm
Van der Waals radius 202 pm
Miscellaneous
Magnetic ordering nonmagnetic
Thermal conductivity (300 K) 9.43 m Wm−1K−1
Speed of sound (gas, 23 C) 220 m/s
Speed of sound (liquid) 1120 m/s
CAS registry number 7439-90-9
Selected isotopes
Main article: Isotopes of krypton iso NA half-life DM DE (MeV) DP
78Kr 0.35% 2.31020 y ε ε - 78Se
79Kr syn 35.04 h ε - 79Br
β+ 0.604 79Br
γ 0.26, 0.39,
0.60 -
80Kr 2.25% Kr is stable with 44 neutrons
81Kr syn 2.29105 y ε - 81Br
γ 0.281 -
82Kr 11.6% Kr is stable with 46 neutrons
83Kr 11.5% Kr is stable with 47 neutrons
84Kr 57% Kr is stable with 48 neutrons
85Kr syn 10.756 y β- 0.687 85Rb
86Kr 17.3% Kr is stable with 50 neutrons
 
References
Krypton (IPA: /ˈkrɪptən/ or /ˈkrɪptan/) is a chemical element with the symbol Kr and atomic number 36. A colorless, odorless, tasteless noble gas, krypton occurs in trace amounts in the atmosphere, is isolated by fractionating liquified air, and is often used with other rare gases in fluorescent lamps. Krypton is inert for most practical purposes but it is known to form compounds with fluorine. Krypton can also form clathrates with water when atoms of it are trapped in a lattice of the water molecules.

Contents [hide]
1 Notable characteristics
2 History
2.1 Metric role
3 Occurrence
4 Compounds
5 Isotopes
6 Uses
6.1 Krypton fluoride laser
7 Footnotes
8 References
9 External links
 
 

Offline iko

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« Last Edit: 26/03/2007 18:12:57 by iko »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #611 on: 12/03/2007 17:11:47 »
Manatee


Manatees (family Trichechidae, genus Trichechus) are large aquatic mammals sometimes known as sea cows. The name comes from the Spanish manat, which itself comes from a Carib word meaning "breast."

The Trichechidae differ from the Dugongidae in the shape of the skull and the shape of the tail. Dugongs have a forked tail, similar in shape to a whale's, while manatees' tails are paddle-shaped. They are herbivores with one exception (discussed in the diet portion below), spend most of their time grazing in shallow waters, and can have a mass anywhere from 500 to 1000 kg. When born, baby manatees have an average mass of 30 kg.[1]

Manatees inhabit the shallow, marshy coastal areas and rivers of the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico (T. manatus, West Indian manatee), the Amazon basin (T. inunguis, Amazonian manatee), and West Africa (T. senegalensis, African manatee). They spend half of their day sleeping in the water, surfacing for air regularly, and at intervals of not longer than 20 minutes.




 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #612 on: 12/03/2007 20:04:39 »
Nocardia asteroides


Nocardiosis

Background: Nocardiosis is an acute, subacute, or chronic infectious disease that occurs in cutaneous, pulmonary, and disseminated forms. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis presents as cutaneous infection (cellulitis or abscess), lymphocutaneous infection (sporotrichoid), or subcutaneous infection (actinomycetoma). Pulmonary infection presents as an acute, subacute, or chronic pneumonitis, usually in immunocompromised hosts. Disseminated nocardiosis may involve any organ; lesions in the brain or meninges are most frequent.

Pathophysiology: Members of the genus Nocardia are aerobic actinomycetes that are ubiquitous saprophytes in soil, decaying organic matter, and water. At least 15 species of the genus Nocardia have been identified and new species continue to be identified. Nocardia asteroides is the most frequent cause of human disease in the United States; various species are dominant in other parts of the world. Nocardia species also cause infections in animals, including bovine mastitis and sporotrichoid nocardiosis in horses.
When observed microscopically, either in Gram stains of clinical specimens or cultures or when demonstrated histopathologically in tissues, Nocardia are branching, beaded, filamentous, gram-positive bacteria with a characteristic morphology to a trained observer. Nocardia usually are weakly acid-fast.
The cutaneous, lymphocutaneous, and subcutaneous forms of nocardiosis arise from local traumatic inoculation. Pleuropulmonary disease presumably arises from inhalation exposure. Disseminated infection results from hematogenous dissemination, usually from a pulmonary focus. Most patients with disseminated nocardiosis have underlying immunocompromising disease or are receiving immunosuppressive therapy.
Nocardiosis produces suppurative necrosis with frequent abscess formation at sites of infection.
Frequency:
In the US: Incidence is 0.4 cases per 100,000 population. An estimated 500-1000 cases occur per year in the United States.
Internationally: No reliable estimates are available.
Mortality/Morbidity: Prognosis in nocardiosis depends on the site of infection, extent of infection, and underlying host factors.

Cure rates with appropriate therapy are approximately 100% in skin and soft-tissue infections.
In pleuropulmonary infections, cure rates of 90% can be achieved with appropriate therapy.
With disseminated infection, cure rates fall to 63%. Cure rates with brain abscess are only 50%.
Race: No racial predilection is evident for nocardiosis.
Sex: Nocardiosis occurs in males more frequently than in females, in a ratio of 3:1. This is thought to be related to an exposure frequency difference rather than a sex difference in susceptibility to infection.
Age: All ages are susceptible. The mean age at diagnosis is in the fourth decade of life.

from emedicine:      http://www.emedicine.com/med/byname/nocardiosis.htm          





« Last Edit: 26/03/2007 18:13:25 by iko »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #613 on: 15/03/2007 18:40:56 »
Orange (colour)


The colour orange occurs between red and yellow in the visible spectrum at a wavelength of about 585620 nm. It is a pure chroma in the colour theory, with a hue of 30 in HSV colour space. The complementary colour of orange is azure. With pigments such as paints or crayons, the primary colours red (or more accurately, magenta) and yellow mixed together produce the secondary colour orange. Orange pigments are largely in the ochre or cadmium families.



The orange, a fruit which the modern name of the orange colour comes from.


Etymology of orange




The colour is named after the orange fruit. Before this was introduced to the English-speaking world, the colour was referred to (in Old English) as geoluhread, which translates into Modern English variously as purple-red, blackred, or hellored (all pronounced the same).

The first recorded use of orange as a colour name in English was in 1512 [1] in the court of King Henry VIII. Upon hearing the word "orange" in reference to a color, Henry reportedly exclaimed, "A color orange? Why, 'tis the noblest divine gift I have witnessed. You, fine sir, are to be my successor!"
 

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« Last Edit: 26/03/2007 18:13:53 by iko »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #615 on: 15/03/2007 22:20:34 »
Quinine


Quinine 'kwi:ni:n is a natural white crystalline alkaloid having antipyretic, anti-malarial with analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties and a bitter taste. It is a stereoisomer of quinidine.

Quinine was previously superseded by chloroquine, but is now again the drug of choice for treatment of falciparum malaria because of the rise of chloroquine resistance. Quinine is available with a prescription in the United States. Quinine is also used to treat nocturnal leg cramps and arthritis and it has also been used (with limited success) to treat people who had been infected by prions. It was once a popular heroin adulterant.



 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #616 on: 16/03/2007 16:23:29 »
 Webster's own:

Reverse Osmosis = a method of extracting essentially pure, fresh water from polluted or salt water, by forcing the water under pressure against a semipermeable membrane, which passes the pure water molecules and filters out salts and other dissolved impurities.
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #617 on: 16/03/2007 17:17:44 »
Sunset


Sunset, also called sundown in some American English dialects, is the time at which the Sun disappears below the horizon in the west. It should not be confused with dusk, which is the point at which darkness falls, some time after the beginning of twilight when the Sun itself sets.
A composite image showing the terminator dividing night from day, running across Europe and Africa. Observers on the surface of the earth along this terminator will see a sunset.



A composite image showing the terminator dividing night from day,
 running across Europe and Africa. Observers on the surface of the
earth along this terminator will see a sunset.


The red hues of the sky at sunset and sunrise are caused by Mie Scattering, not Rayleigh Scattering. The colours of the sky throughout the day and at sunrise and sunset, are explained by the phenomena of both Rayleigh Scattering and Mie Scattering. The colour of the sky described by Rayleigh Scattering applies to the hues of blue, violet and green, not to the reds, oranges, peaches and purples of sunrise and sunset. Rayleigh Scattering is scattering of shorter wavelength light (e.g. blue & violet) by air atoms and molecules (not statistical variations in density of the Earth's atmosphere). The magnitude or strength of Rayleigh Scattering varies by the reciprocal of the wavelength raised to the fourth power, and hence does not explain the beautiful variations of reds, purples, oranges and peachy colours. The latter colours arise from Mie Scattering, low angle scattering of light off dust, soot, smoke and (ash) particles. Mie Scattering (producing the colours of sunset and sunrise) is beautifully recognizable down-wind of and after dust storms, forest fires and volcanic eruptions that inject large quantities of fine particulate matter into the atmosphere. A number of eruptions in recent times, such as those of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 and Krakatoa in 1883, have been sufficiently large to produce remarkable sunsets and sunrises all over the world. Sometimes just before sunrise or after sunset a green flash can be seen.

The sunset is often more brightly coloured than the sunrise, with the shades of red and orange being more vibrant. The atmosphere responds in a number of ways to exposure to the Sun during daylight hours. In particular, there tends to be more dust in the lower atmosphere at the end of the day than at the beginning. During the day, the Sun heats the surface of the Earth, lowering the relative humidity and increasing wind speed and turbulence, which serves to lift dust into the air. However, differences between sunrise and sunset may in some cases depend more on the geographical particulars of the location from which they are viewed. For example, on a west-facing coastline, sunset occurs over water while sunrise occurs over land.


 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #618 on: 17/03/2007 01:46:11 »
WOW!!!!!!!!WOW!!!!!!!!!WOW!!!!!!!!!! That is absolutely awesome so gorgeous! I have never seen one like that before..Thanks..

Technology
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #619 on: 17/03/2007 14:20:04 »
Glad ewe like the sunsets mam.I took those photos myself . It's the view from my bedroom window !!





Unconscious (or intuitive) communication is the transfer of information unconsciously between humans.

It is sometimes intrapersonal, like dreaming or cognition under the effects of hypnosis, and is not necessarily nonverbal communication.

Research has shown that our conscious attention can attend to 5-9 items simultaneously. All other information is processed by the unconscious mind. For example, the unconscious mind sometimes picks up on and relates nonverbal cues about an individual based on how he or she has arranged his or her settings such as his or her home or place of work.

Usually our unconscious communication and unconscious behaviour are influenced or dictated by our culture. Communication between people of different cultures and subcultures can sometimes cause unexpected suffering and conflicts. So, understanding of unconscious communication can avoid such conflicts.

Also, unconscious communication can cause changes in mood or emotion.
« Last Edit: 17/03/2007 14:23:00 by neilep »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #620 on: 17/03/2007 14:35:57 »
Virtual reality

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Virtual reality (VR) is a technology which allows a user to interact with a computer-simulated environment, be it a real or imagined one. Most current virtual reality environments are primarily visual experiences, displayed either on a computer screen or through special stereoscopic displays, but some simulations include additional sensory information, such as sound through speakers or headphones. Some advanced, haptic systems now include tactile information, generally known as force feedback, in medical and gaming applications. Users can interact with a virtual environment or a virtual artifact (VA) either through the use of standard input devices such as a keyboard and mouse, or through multimodal devices such as a wired glove, the Polhemus boom arm, and omnidirectional treadmill. The simulated environment can be similar to the real world, for example, simulations for pilot or combat training, or it can differ significantly from reality, as in VR games. In practice, it is currently very difficult to create a high-fidelity virtual reality experience, due largely to technical limitations on processing power, image resolution and communication bandwidth. However, those limitations are expected to eventually be overcome as processor, imaging and data communication technologies become more powerful and cost-effective over time.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_reality

 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #621 on: 17/03/2007 21:14:49 »
White

Technically speaking, white is not a color at all, but rather the combination of all the colors of the visible light spectrum.[1] It is sometimes described as an achromatic color, like black.

As a misnomer, however, white is the color of things that reflect light of all parts of the visible spectrum equally and are not dull (see grey).

The color has high brightness but zero hue. The impression of white light can be created by mixing, via a process called additive mixing, appropriate intensities of the primary color spectrum: red, green and blue, but it must be noted that the illumination provided by this technique has significant differences from that produced by incandescence.

In nature, the color white results when transparent fibers, particles, or droplets are in a transparent matrix of a substantially different refractive index. Examples include classic "white" substances such as sugar, foam, pure sand or snow, cotton, clouds, milk, etc. Crystal boundaries and imperfections can also make otherwise transparent materials white, as in the case of milky quartz or the microcrystalline structure of a seashell. This is also true for artificial paints and pigments, where the color white results when finely divided transparent material of a high refractive index is suspended in a contrasting binder. Typically paints contain calcium carbonate and/or synthetic rutile with no other pigments if a white color is desired.





A White Rose














A polar bear juggling snowballs !!
« Last Edit: 17/03/2007 21:17:09 by neilep »
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #622 on: 17/03/2007 22:05:44 »
 HEE HEE HEE!!! LOL LOL!! Love the juggling polor bear!!!
The white rose is perfect and very beautiful.. I did not know that about the color white!

Xanthate = A salt of ester of Xanthic acid
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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #623 on: 18/03/2007 17:45:12 »
Egg Yolk Which also happens to be Yellow !


An egg yolk surrounded by the egg white

An egg yolk is the part of an egg which serves as the food source for the developing embryo inside. Prior to fertilzation the yolk together with the germinal disc is a single cell. The yolk is supplied to the egg by the mother. Mammalian embryos live off their yolk until they implant on the wall of the uterus. The egg yolk is suspended in the egg white (known more formally as albumen or ovalbumin) by one or two spiral bands of tissue called the chalazae.

As a food, yolks are a major source of vitamins and minerals. They contain all of the egg's fat and cholesterol, and almost half of the protein.

If left intact while cooking fried eggs, the yellow yolk surrounded by a flat blob of egg white creates the distinctive sunny-side up form of the food. Mixing the two components together before frying results in the pale yellow form found in omelettes and scrambled eggs.
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #624 on: 18/03/2007 17:55:03 »
Zymology = The science dealing with fermentation
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #624 on: 18/03/2007 17:55:03 »

 

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