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Author Topic: A-Z of AVIONICS  (Read 448311 times)

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #825 on: 12/10/2007 17:07:45 »
Icarus



...more from:  http://zuserver2.star.ucl.ac.uk/~apod/apod/ap980812.html

August 12, 1998

ERAST Pathfinder-Plus: Daedalus Defied


 
Explanation:
Daedalus warned Icarus that if he flew too high, the Sun would melt his wings.
Apparently, nobody gave the ERAST Pathfinder-Plus aircraft a similar warning. Earlier this month, not only did Pathfinder-Plus fly higher than any previous propeller-driven aircraft - its wings converted sunlight into power.
Pictured, Pathfinder-Plus is flying above Hawaii soon after soaring to a record height of 24,700 metres. What's more, Pathfinder-Plus is only a prototype -- future aircraft in the ERAST program may fly higher. Pathfinder's wings spread nearly 30 metres, and its total mass is only about 270 kilograms. NASA's Pathfinder-Plus is flown by remote control, and can stay aloft for weeks at a time.
 
« Last Edit: 12/10/2007 17:22:36 by iko »
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #826 on: 12/10/2007 17:31:25 »
Jousting

 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #827 on: 12/10/2007 19:20:24 »
Potassium, symbol K (from Latin kalium, “alkali”), chemically reactive, extremely soft metallic element. In group 1 (or Ia) of the periodic table (see Periodic Law), potassium is one of the alkali metals. The atomic number of potassium is 19.


Potassium was discovered and named in 1807 by the British chemist Sir Humphry Davy. The element’s name comes from potash, a potassium compound originally obtained by soaking wood ash in a pot of water and allowing the water to evaporate. The metal is silvery white and can be cut with a knife. It has a hardness of 0.5. Potassium exists in three natural isotopic forms, with mass numbers 39, 40, and 41. Potassium-40 is radioactive and has a half-life of 1.26 billion years. The most abundant isotope is potassium-39. Several radioactive isotopes have been artificially prepared. Potassium melts at about 63°C (about 145°F), boils at about 760°C (about 1400°F), and has a specific gravity of 0.86; the atomic weight of potassium is 39.098.

Potassium metal is prepared by the electrolysis of fused potassium hydroxide or of a mixture of potassium chloride and potassium fluoride. The metal oxidizes as soon as it is exposed to air and reacts violently with water, yielding potassium hydroxide and hydrogen gas. Because hydrogen gas produced in the reaction with water burns spontaneously, potassium is always stored under a liquid such as kerosene, with which it does not react.

Potassium is found in nature in large quantities, ranking eighth in order of abundance of the elements in Earth’s crust, in various minerals such as carnallite, feldspar, saltpeter, greensand, and sylvite. Potassium is a constituent of all plant and animal tissue as well as a vital constituent of fertile soil.








 

Offline iko

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« Last Edit: 11/11/2007 09:21:56 by iko »
 

Offline Alandriel

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #829 on: 18/10/2007 13:25:59 »

              M - Milky Way













 ;D
 

 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #830 on: 18/10/2007 13:42:12 »
Nanobot

In an attempt to rebuild Lister's arm, the crew devise a plan with Kryten's nanobots, small robots that carry out repair work inside him. The only problem is that his nanobots deserted him years ago - hunting them down, the crew learn that those same nanobots reduced Red Dwarf to nanoscopic proportions, and hid it inside Starbug. Finally, the crew manage to reform Lister and Red Dwarf... Or do they?

 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #831 on: 19/10/2007 21:55:49 »
Overrun







On 25 July 2005, at about 1835 Eastern Standard Time, a Piper Aircraft Corporation PA-31-350 (Chieftain) aircraft, registered VH-PRJ, overran runway 27 at Nhill aerodrome following a rejected night takeoff. The aircraft was being operated on an instrument flight rules charter flight to Charlton, Vic, with the pilot and three passengers on board. The pilot and passengers sustained injuries during the overrun and the aircraft was substantially damaged.

The pilot stated that the take-off roll was from a rolling start with power being slowly applied until engine turbo-charger output stabilised. At about 90 kts indicated air speed, the pilot attempted to rotate the aircraft but encountered resistance to rearward movement of the control column. He decided to reject the takeoff because the aircraft speed at the time was below his nominated decision speed of 100 kts. The pilot reported that he then reduced the engine power to idle and applied maximum braking.

A subsequent inspection of the aircraft revealed that there were no pre-existing defects in the elevator control system and elevator trim system or evidence of interference with the elevator surfaces.



« Last Edit: 11/11/2007 09:22:16 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #832 on: 19/10/2007 22:54:25 »
Panic attack

Panic attacks are sudden, discrete periods of intense anxiety, fear and discomfort that are associated with a variety of somatic and cognitive symptoms[1]. The onset of these episodes is typically abrupt, and may have no obvious trigger. Although these episodes may appear random, they are considered to be a subset of an evolutionary response commonly referred to as fight or flight that occur out of context, flooding the body with hormones (particularly adrenalin) that aid in defending itself from harm. [2]

According to the American Psychological Association the symptoms of a panic attack commonly last approximately ten minutes. However, panic attacks can be as short as 1-5 minutes, while more severe panic attacks may form a cyclic series of episodes, lasting for an extended period, sometimes hours. Often those afflicted will experience significant anticipatory anxiety in between attacks and in situations where attacks have previously occurred.

Panic attacks also affect people differently. Experienced sufferers may be able to completely 'ride out' a panic attack with little to no obvious symptoms. Others, notably first time sufferers, may even call for emergency services; many who experience a panic attack for the first time fear they are having a heart attack or a nervous breakdown.(Wilson 1996)



I Just has a Panic attack...for some reason I posted an article with the letter 's' after Ikos 'O' !!..now why on earth did I do that ?
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #833 on: 19/10/2007 22:58:23 »
Qwerty

http://cscs.umich.edu/~crshalizi/notebooks/qwerty.html



"Look at the first line of letters on your keyboard: QWERTYUIOP. There's no real reason why just those letters should be sitting there in just that order: except that one of the early sorts of type-writers had that order, and became more popular than its competitors, and so fixed the pattern more or less permanently.QWERTY has become a general name for such "lock-ins" in technology and economics, also known as "path-dependence" (a mangled bit of physics jargon). It is held to result from "switching costs". These take two forms."

[size=07pt](Why did you have a panic attack? You need to relax)[/size]
« Last Edit: 19/10/2007 23:05:59 by Karen W. »
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #834 on: 20/10/2007 00:05:55 »
Resting EKG

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/electrocardiogram-specialized-ekgs

This is how it works!

During the procedure, a technician will attach 10 electrodes with adhesive pads to the skin of your chest, arms and legs. Men may have chest hair shaved to allow a better connection. You will lie flat while the computer creates a picture, on graph paper, of the electrical impulses traveling through your heart. This is called a "resting" EKG. This same test may also be used to monitor your heart during exercise.
 

Offline iko

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« Last Edit: 11/11/2007 09:23:16 by iko »
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #836 on: 20/10/2007 09:31:55 »
Tea!

 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #837 on: 20/10/2007 10:21:49 »
« Last Edit: 11/11/2007 09:23:31 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #838 on: 20/10/2007 15:31:38 »
V-chip


V-chip is a generic term used for television receivers allowing the blocking of programs based on their ratings category. It is intended for use by parents to manage their children's television viewing. Most 13-inch and larger televisions manufactured for the United States market since 1999 and all units as of January 2000 are required to have the V-chip technology. Many devices similar to the V-chip have been produced.

The rated programs' signals are encoded according to the rating, on line 21 of the broadcast signal's vertical blanking interval using the XDS protocol, and this is detected by the television set's V-chip. If the program's rating is outside the level configured as acceptable on that particular television, the program is blocked.

The V-chip technology was developed by Tim Collings of Simon Fraser University.

The V-chip has a 4 digit numerical password in order to keep older children from changing its settings. However, it can be overridden by savvier youth who read the television's manual to find out how to reset the password to 0000 (built into the V-chip in case the parents themselves forget the password that they set).

The name V-chip is widely believed to come from the word "violence," but an interview with Tim Collings reveals that it was intended to stand for "viewer control."[
 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #839 on: 20/10/2007 16:55:11 »
Winglets





...why winglets?       http://www.mandhsoaring.com/winglets.html



Wingtip devices are usually intended to improve the efficiency of fixed-wing aircraft.[1] There are several types of devices, and though they function in different manners, the intended aerodynamic effect is to modify the aircraft's wake in some beneficial manner. Wingtip devices can also improve aircraft handling characteristics. From a marketing standpoint, they are also valued for their aesthetic appeal, and aircraft have been equipped with them for cosmetic reasons as well.

Such devices increase the effective aspect ratio of a wing, with less added wingspan. An extension of span would lower lift-induced drag, but would increase parasitic drag, and would require boosting the strength and weight of the wing. At some point there is no net benefit from further increased span. There may also be operational considerations that limit the allowable wingspan. Despite all the research, no references exists that conclude the winglet performs as well as or better than simply extending the wing.[citation needed]

The wingtip devices increase the lift generated at the wingtip, and reduce the lift-induced drag caused by wingtip vortices, improving lift-to-drag ratio. This increases fuel efficiency in powered aircraft, and cross-country speed in gliders, in both cases increasing range.

more from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wingtip_device 
« Last Edit: 11/11/2007 09:23:49 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #840 on: 20/10/2007 16:59:56 »
X-plane (aircraft)










The X-planes are a series of experimental United States aircraft (and some rockets) used for testing of new technologies and usually kept highly secret during development.

The first of these, the Bell X-1, became well-known as the first plane to break the sound barrier, which it did in 1947. Later X-planes yielded important research results, but only the North American X-15 rocket plane of the early 1960s achieved comparable fame. X-planes 7 through 12 were actually missiles, and some other vehicles were unpiloted. Most X-planes are not expected to ever go into full-scale production, and usually only a few are produced. One exception is the Lockheed Martin X-35, which competed against the Boeing X-32 to become the Joint Strike Fighter.

As of 2006, new X-plane projects are still underway. The designation X-52 was skipped to avoid potential confusion with the operational B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber.
 

Offline iko

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« Last Edit: 11/11/2007 09:24:06 by iko »
 

Offline Alandriel

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #842 on: 25/10/2007 16:30:30 »
              ZULU

  • Zulu timeis that which is more commonly know as "GMT" (Greenwich Mean Time). Our natural concept of time is linked to the rotation of the earth and we define the length of the day as the 24 hours it takes (on average) the earth to spin once on its axis.

    As time pieces became more accurate and communication became global, there needed to be a point from which all other world times were based. Since Great Britain was the world's foremost maritime power when the concept of latitude and longitude came to be, the starting point for designating longitude was the "prime meridian" which is zero degrees and runs through the Royal Greenwich Observatory, in Greenwich, England.

    When the concept of time zones was introduced, the "starting" point for calculating the different time zones was agreed to be the Royal Greenwich Observatory.

    Unfortunately the Earth does not rotate at exactly a constant rate. Due to various scientific reasons and increased accuracy (high-precision atomic time standard) in measuring the earth's rotation, a new timescale, called Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), has been adopted and replaces the term GMT
  • an important South African ethnic group; originally a minor clan in what is today Northern KwaZulu-Natal, founded ca. 1709 by Zulu kaNtombhela. In the Zulu language, Zulu means heaven, or sky
  • the language of the Zulu people is Zulu or isiZulu, a Bantu language
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #843 on: 25/10/2007 16:41:04 »
Alandriel

New bright happy welcome member of the TNS family !!

 ;) ;)
 

Offline neilep

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #844 on: 25/10/2007 16:43:29 »
Ångström

An ångström or angstrom (symbol Å) (IPA pronunciation: [ˈæŋstrəm] or [ˈɔŋstrəm]; Swedish: [ˈɔ̀ŋstrœm]) is a non-SI unit of length that is internationally recognized, equal to 0.1 nanometre (nm). It can be written in scientific notations as 1×10−10 m (normalized notation) or 1 E-10 m (exponential notation) — both meaning 1/10,000,000,000 metres. It is sometimes used in expressing the sizes of atoms, lengths of chemical bonds and visible-light spectra, and dimensions of parts of integrated circuits. It is commonly applied in structural biology. It is named after Anders Jonas Ångström.
 

Offline Alandriel

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #845 on: 25/10/2007 17:41:14 »

           

                     badinage

The badinerie or badinage is a brief and lively dance. It takes its name from the French badiner (to jest).

The term arose during the 18th century when the badinerie was first included as a movement in the Baroque suite.

Johann Sebastian Bach's (1685-1750) badinerie from his Orchestral Suite No. 2 in B minor for flute and strings, BWV 1067, is perhaps the best-known example.

Badinage can also refer to playful repartee, or banter.

 ;) ;D

 

Offline iko

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #846 on: 25/10/2007 22:22:45 »
Alandriel, you should check the list,
Zulu had been cited much before !!!  :D

Zulu

...Last 'word' in our International Radio Operator Alphabet!

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=5250.msg48296




Alpha
Bravo
Charlie
Delta
Echo
Fox
Golf
Hotel
India
Juliet
Kilo
Lima
Mike
November
Oscar
Papa
Quebec
Romeo
Sierra
Tango
Uniform
Victor
Whiskey
X-Ray
Yankee
Zulu

http://www.electronicaviation.com/articles/General/281


Zand zow, zear zrendos zI zink zis zud ze zhe zend zof zit!!!  ;D











Catapult


« Last Edit: 11/11/2007 09:24:39 by iko »
 

Offline Alandriel

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #847 on: 03/11/2007 22:02:17 »
Iko - I'm too lazy to check the whole thread (34 pages!) besides, it's kinda difficult to find good Z material - You and I obviously have excellent tastes ;D
someone should make an index in the first post..  ;D ;D


D - DOG DAYS

The phrase Dog Days' or the dog days of summer", refers to the hottest, most sultry days of summer. They are a phenomenon of the northern hemisphere that usually falls between July and early September but the actual dates vary greatly from region to region, depending on latitude and climate. Dog Days can also define a time period or event that is very hot or stagnant.

The term "Dog Days" was coined by the ancient Romans, who called these days caniculares dies (days of the dogs) after Sirius (the "Dog Star"), the brightest star in the heavens besides the Sun.

Popularly believed to be an evil time "when the seas boiled, wine turned sour, dogs grew mad, and all creatures became languid, causing to man burning fevers, hysterics, and phrensies" - Brady’s Clavis Calendarium, 1813.

The Dog Days originally were the days when Sirius, the Dog Star, rose just before or at the same time as sunrise, which is no longer true owing to precession of the equinoxes. The ancients sacrificed a brown dog at the beginning of the Dog Days to appease the rage of Sirius, believing that that star was the cause of the hot, sultry weather.



{With this topic I'm compensating for a cold November night}
 ;D






« Last Edit: 03/11/2007 22:04:57 by Alandriel »
 

Offline iko

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« Last Edit: 27/04/2008 13:30:08 by iko »
 

Offline Quantum_Vaccuum

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #849 on: 07/11/2007 01:46:19 »
Fr Francium
Quote
Francium (IPA: /ˈfrænsiəm/), formerly known as eka-caesium and actinium K,[1] is a chemical element that has the symbol Fr and atomic number 87. It has the lowest known electronegativity and is the second rarest naturally occurring element (after Astatine). Francium is a highly radioactive metal that decays into astatine, radium, and radon. As an alkali metal, it has one valence electron.

Marguerite Perey discovered francium in 1939. Francium was the last element discovered in nature, rather than synthesized. [2] Outside the laboratory, francium is extremely rare, with trace amounts found in uranium and thorium ores, where the isotope francium-223 is continually formed and continually decays. Perhaps an ounce exists at any given time throughout the Earth's crust; the other isotopes are entirely synthetic. The largest amount ever collected of any isotope was a cluster of 10,000 atoms (of francium-210) created as an ultracold gas at Stony Brook in 1996.[3]
 

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Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #849 on: 07/11/2007 01:46:19 »

 

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