The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: A-Z of AVIONICS  (Read 449106 times)

Offline Sarah Elizabeth

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 13
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #900 on: 17/12/2007 15:03:37 »
Tsunami.... !!! the asian tsunami did not change the earths tilt at all, however it may have altered the earths wobble ! because the sumatran Tsunami was nearer one shore than the other,and one plate had a mch bigger force than the other,( which moved less, ) the effects will be lop sided !
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #901 on: 17/12/2007 22:45:22 »
Tsunami.... !!! the asian tsunami did not change the earths tilt at all, however it may have altered the earths wobble ! because the sumatran Tsunami was nearer one shore than the other,and one plate had a mch bigger force than the other,( which moved less, ) the effects will be lop sided !
Hi Sara Elizabeth !!...

I luff you're post....it really is superb and thank ewe so much for posting it and WELCOME to the site too Ms Sara Elizabeth.


Just one thing....and it's my fault for not clarifying it...but entries here in this thread are posted in alphabetical order !......with the previous post beginning with a 'V'.....the next post should begin with a 'W'.....

Hey !..ti's not a prob.....but I thought I'd mention it to ya.
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #902 on: 17/12/2007 22:56:55 »
Wind is the flow of air. More generally, it is the flow of the gases which compose an atmosphere; since wind is not only an Earth based phenomenon.

Winds are commonly classified by their spatial scale, their speed, the types of forces that cause them, the geographic regions in which they occur, or their effect.

There are global winds, such as the wind belts which exist between the atmospheric circulation cells. There are upper-level winds which typically include narrow belts of concentrated flow called jet streams. There are synoptic-scale winds that result from pressure differences in surface air masses in the middle latitudes, and there are winds that come about as a consequence of geographic features, such as the sea breezes on coastlines or canyon breezes near mountains. Mesoscale winds are those which act on a local scale, such as gust fronts. At the smallest scale are the microscale winds, which blow on a scale of only tens to hundreds of meters and are essentially unpredictable, such as dust devils and microbursts.

Forces which drive wind or affect it are the pressure gradient force, the Coriolis force, buoyancy forces, and friction forces. When a difference in pressure exists between two adjacent air masses, the air tends to flow from the region of high pressure to the region of low pressure. On a rotating planet, flows will be acted upon by the Coriolis force, in regions sufficiently far from the equator and sufficiently high above the surface.

The three major driving factors of large scale global winds are the differential heating between the equator and the poles (difference in absorption of solar energy between these climate zones), and the rotation of the planet.



Wind doing what it does best....being windy !!!...just like my bot bot after eating curried beans !!

 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #903 on: 19/12/2007 18:55:20 »
X-RAY inspection (wings and fuselage)




Digiray® real-time Reverse Geometry X-ray® (RGX®) systems open up new opportunities in aerospace non-destructive evaluation (NDE):

unparalleled contrast resolution (up to ten times better than conventional systems)
increased throughput (no film to develop)
completely digital (first-generation image quality)
small detectors (one centimeter square)
detects corrosion, impact damage, cracks, foreign objects, and flaws in manufacturing that conventional x-ray systems cannot resolve.
Typical aerospace applications include NDE of:

corrosion
impact damage
water entrapment in both aluminum and composite structures

...

more reading: http://www.digiray.com/aircraft/aircraft.htm



« Last Edit: 19/12/2007 19:07:34 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #904 on: 20/12/2007 22:02:08 »
 Yukawa Hideki






Hideki Yukawa FRSE (湯川 秀樹, January 23, 1907 – September 8, 1981) was a Japanese theoretical physicist and the first Japanese person to win the Nobel prize.

Yukawa was born in Tokyo, on January 23, 1907. In 1929, after receiving his degree from Kyoto Imperial University he stayed on as a lecturer for four years. After graduation, he was interested in theoretical physics, particularly in the theory of elementary particles. In 1932, he married Sumi (スミ) and had two sons, Harumi and Takaaki. In 1933 he became an assistant professor at Osaka University, at age 26.

In 1935 he published his theory of mesons, which explained the interaction between protons and neutrons, and was a major influence on research into elementary particles. In 1940 he became a professor in Kyoto University. In 1940 he won the Imperial Prize of the Japan Academy, in 1943 the Decoration of Cultural Merit from the Japanese government. In 1949 he became a professor at Columbia University, the same year he won the Nobel prize in physics, after the discovery by Cecil Powell of Yukawa's predicted pion in 1947. Yukawa also predicted K-capture, in which a low energy hydrogen electron could be absorbed by the nucleus.

Yukawa became the first chairman at Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics 1953. He received a Doctor, honoris causa from the University of Paris, and honorary memberships of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Indian Academy of Sciences, the International Academy of Philosophy and Sciences, and the Pontificia Academia Scientiarum were granted to him for acknowledgement in science.

He had been an editor at Progress of Theoretical Physics since 1946. He had published many scientific papers and lecture notes, including Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (1946) and Introduction to the Theory of Elementary Particles (1948), both in Japanese.

In 1955, he joined 10 other leading scientists and intellectuals in signing the Russell-Einstein Manifesto, calling for nuclear disarmament.

SOURCE:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hideki_Yukawa
 

Offline Karen W.

  • Moderator
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *****
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #905 on: 21/12/2007 12:09:00 »
Zebrass =

The offspring of a male Zebra and a female ass.
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #906 on: 24/12/2007 18:57:06 »
Alexander Agassiz Medal

The Alexander Agassiz Medal is awarded by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences for an original contribution in the science of oceanography. It was established by Sir John Murray in honor of his friend Alexander Agassiz.






 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
« Last Edit: 27/12/2007 18:07:41 by iko »
 

Offline Simulated

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7188
  • Thanked: 1 times
  • Simulated..What more do you needa know :P
    • View Profile
    • Facebook
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #908 on: 05/01/2008 21:00:20 »
C for Coffee



Coffee is a widely consumed stimulant beverage prepared from roasted seeds, commonly called beans, of the coffee plant. Coffee was first consumed in the 9th century, when it was discovered in the highlands of Ethiopia.[1] From there, it spread to Egypt and Yemen, and by the 15th century had reached Persia, Turkey, and northern Africa. From the Muslim world, coffee spread to Italy, then to the rest of Europe and the Americas.[2] Today, coffee is one of the most popular beverages worldwide.[3]

Coffee berries, which contain the coffee bean, are produced by several species of small evergreen bush of the genus Coffea. The two most commonly grown species are Coffea canephora (also known as Coffea robusta) and Coffea arabica. These are cultivated in Latin America, southeast Asia, and Africa. Once ripe, coffee berries are picked, processed, and dried. The seeds are then roasted, undergoing several physical and chemical changes. They are roasted to various degrees, depending on the desired flavor. They are then ground and brewed to create coffee. Coffee can be prepared and presented by a variety of methods.

 

Offline Karen W.

  • Moderator
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *****
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #909 on: 05/01/2008 21:37:53 »
Dermotology

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dermatology

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Dermatology (from Greek δερμα, "skin") is a branch of medicine dealing with the skin and its appendages (hair, sweat glands, etc).
Scope of the field

Dermatologists are physicians (Medical Doctors) specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and tumors of the skin and its appendages. There are medical and surgical sides to the specialty. Dermatologic surgeons practice skin cancer surgery (including Mohs' micrographic surgery), laser surgery, photodynamic therapy (PDT) and cosmetic procedures using botulinum toxin ('Botox'), soft tissue fillers, sclerotherapy and liposuction. Dermatopathologists interpret tissue under the microscope (histopathology). Pediatric dermatologists specialize in the diagnoses and treatment of skin disease in children. Immunodermatologists specialize in the diagnosis and management of skin diseases driven by an altered immune system including blistering (bullous) diseases like pemphigus. In addition, there is a wide range of congenital syndromes managed by dermatologists.

[edit] Subspecialties

The skin is the largest organ of the body and the most visible. Although many skin diseases are isolated, some are manifestations of internal disease. Hence, a dermatologist is schooled in aspects of surgery, rheumatology (many rheumatic diseases can feature skin symptoms and signs), immunology, neurology (the "neurocuteaneous syndromes", such as neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis), infectious diseases and endocrinology. The study of genetics is also becoming increasingly important.

[edit] Venereology and phlebology

Venereology, the subspecialty that diagnoses and treats sexually transmitted diseases, and phlebology, the specialty that deals with problems of the superficial venous system, are both part of a dermatologist's expertise.

[edit] Cosmetic dermatology

Cosmetic dermatology has long been an important part of the field, and dermatologists have been the primary innovators in this area. In the 1900's dermatologists employed dermabrasion to improve acne scarring and fat microtransfer was used to fill in cutaneous defects. Dermatologists specializing in cosmetic dermatology typically use non-invasive procedures to reverse the signs of aging. Botox has been used since it was FDA approved for the treatment of wrinkles. It is used to minimize wrinkles such as frown lines and crow's feet. Fillers are used to "fill in" lines on the face and to minimize the appearance wrinkles. Brand names of fillers include Restylane, Perlane, Juvederm, Radiesse and Cosmoplast among many others. Dermatologists are also the pioneers of energy based treatments for the skin and these include lasers, intense pulsed light, radiofrequency, infrared light and photodynamic treatments. While "cosmetic dermatology" can be practiced by any MD, a board-certified dermatologist or someone who has completed a dermatology residency are the most qualified doctors to perform these types of procedures.
 

Offline rosalind dna

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2019
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #910 on: 05/01/2008 21:49:40 »
Epidermis
the first layer of skin.
 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #911 on: 08/01/2008 21:59:37 »
Fatigue cracking (aircraft)





...
The Washington, D.C.-based safety board ruled that fatigue cracks caused the wings to snap off a C-130A on June 17, 2002, just south of the Nevada state line in Walker, Calif., shortly after its takeoff from the Douglas County Airport in Minden.
...
http://www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2004/Apr-24-Sat-2004/news/23730288.html
« Last Edit: 08/01/2008 22:06:17 by iko »
 

Offline Simulated

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7188
  • Thanked: 1 times
  • Simulated..What more do you needa know :P
    • View Profile
    • Facebook
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #912 on: 09/01/2008 00:05:52 »
G is for Green Grass (That Sheepy likes to cheww on)



Grass is a common word that generally describes a monocotyledonous green plant in the family Gramineae (Poaceae). True grasses include most plants grown as grains, for pasture, and for lawns (turf). They include some more specialised crops such as lemongrass, as well as many ornamental plants, and some weeds. They also include plants often not recognized to be grasses, such as bamboos or some species of weeds called crab grass.

« Last Edit: 09/01/2008 01:08:53 by Simulated »
 

Offline opus

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 326
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #913 on: 09/01/2008 23:40:41 »
H is for haggis- sheepy's stomach!
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #914 on: 09/01/2008 23:50:09 »
H is for haggis- sheepy's stomach!

 ;) ;)hmmm..must be why I'm hungry so much !! ;)


Invisible ink.............. is a substance used for writing, which is either invisible on application, or soon thereafter, and which later on can be made visible by some means. The use of invisible ink is a form of steganography, and has been used in espionage. Other uses may include anticounterfeiting, property marking, hand stamping for readmission, children's games, and marking for the purpose of identification in manufacturing.




A drawing of Me done in Invisble Ink !


« Last Edit: 09/01/2008 23:52:17 by neilep »
 

Offline opus

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 326
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #915 on: 10/01/2008 00:20:44 »
J is for jam- preserve made by mixing fruit , sugar and stuff!
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #916 on: 10/01/2008 15:25:27 »
Kirlian photography refers to a form of photogram made with high voltage. It is named after Semyon Kirlian, who in 1939 accidentally discovered that if an object on a photographic plate is connected to a source of high voltage, small corona discharges (created by the strong electric field at the edges of the object) create an image on photographic plate.[1]

Kirlian's work, from 1939 onward, involved an independent rediscovery of a phenomenon and technique variously called "electrography," "electrophotography," and "corona discharge photography." The underlying physics (which makes xerographic copying possible) was explored as early as 1777 by Georg Christoph Lichtenberg (see Lichtenberg figures). Later workers in the field included Nikola Tesla; various other individuals explored the effect in the later 19th and early 20th centuries. Yet Kirlian took the development of the effect further than any of his predecessors.

In controversial metaphysical contexts, Kirlian photography, Kirlian energy, and so on, are sometimes referred to as just "Kirlian." Kirlian made controversial claims that his method showed proof of supernatural auras, said to resemble a rough outline of the object like a colorful halo. An experiment advanced as evidence of energy fields generated by living entities involves taking Kirlian contact photographs of a picked leaf at set periods, its gradual withering being said to correspond with a decline in the strength of the aura. Scientifically, it is considered more likely that as the leaf loses moisture it becomes less electrically conductive, causing a gradual weakening of the electrical field at the drier edges of the leaf.



 

Offline InfraDead

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 18
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #917 on: 10/01/2008 18:51:40 »
Laboratory: newbielink:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laboratory [nonactive]
« Last Edit: 10/01/2008 18:55:15 by neilep »
 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #918 on: 10/01/2008 19:06:44 »
Magnetic compass




- The most common liquid-type compass, capable of calibration to compensate for magnetic influences within the aircraft.

« Last Edit: 11/01/2008 12:05:31 by iko »
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #919 on: 10/01/2008 19:28:54 »
Nicolaas Bloembergen (born Dordrecht, March 11, 1920) is an Dutch-born American physicist. He received his Ph.D. from University of Leiden and Harvard in 1948; while pursuing his PhD at Harvard, Bloembergen also worked part-time as a graduate research assistant for Edward Mills Purcell at the MIT Radiation Laboratory[1]. He became a professor at Harvard University.

Bloembergen enrolled in 1938 at the University of Utrecht to study physics. Bloembergen left the war ravaged Netherlands in 1945 to pursue graduate studies at Harvard University. Six weeks before his arrival, Harvard Professor Edward M. Purcell (along with his graduate students Torrey and Pound) discovered nuclear magnetic resonance. Bloembergen was hired to develop a first NMR machine. While at Harvard he enjoyed classes from Schwinger, Van Vleck and Kemble. His thesis Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation was submitted both in Leiden, where he passed qualifying criteria, and Harvard. After a brief postdoctoral appointment with C. J. Gorter in the Netherlands, he joined Harvard he was named a junior fellow of Society of Fellows in 1949 and Associate Professor in 1951.

In 1958, he became a naturalized citizen of the United States.

He was awarded the Lorentz Medal in 1978. Nicolaas Bloembergen shared the 1981 Nobel Prize in Physics with Arthur Schawlow and Kai Siegbahn for their work in laser spectroscopy. Bloembergen and Schawlow investigated properties of matter undetectable without lasers. He had earlier modified the maser of Charles Townes. Bloembergen serves on the University of Arizona faculty.

Bloembergen belongs to prolific J. J. Thomson academic lineage tree, following in footsteps of other Nobel Laureates beginning with Lord Rayleigh (Physics Nobel Prize in 1904) and J. J. Thomson (Nobel 1906), and continued with Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1908), Owen Richardson (Physics Nobel, 1918) and finally Bloembergen's advisor, Edward Purcell (Physics Nobel 1952). Prof. Bloembergen is a member of the Board of Sponsors of The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists[2]. His other influences included John Van Vleck (Physics Nobel 1977) and Percy Bridgman (Physics Nobel 1946).




 

Offline Simulated

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7188
  • Thanked: 1 times
  • Simulated..What more do you needa know :P
    • View Profile
    • Facebook
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #920 on: 11/01/2008 02:18:02 »
O is for Osprey.

A bird of prey right? lol I thikn soo
 

Offline InfraDead

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 18
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #921 on: 11/01/2008 20:32:35 »
Particles: extremely small constituents of matter, such as an atom or nucleus.
 

Offline iko

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1626
  • Thanked: 1 times
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #922 on: 11/01/2008 20:52:15 »
 

Offline Simulated

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7188
  • Thanked: 1 times
  • Simulated..What more do you needa know :P
    • View Profile
    • Facebook
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #923 on: 11/01/2008 22:35:57 »
R is for Robins
« Last Edit: 23/03/2008 17:40:13 by Simulated »
 

Offline InfraDead

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 18
    • View Profile
Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #924 on: 12/01/2008 09:46:31 »
Subatomic Particles: A subatomic particle is an elementary or composite particle smaller than an atom. Particle physics and nuclear physics are concerned with the study of these particles, their interactions, and non-atomic matter.

 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: A-Z of AVIONICS
« Reply #924 on: 12/01/2008 09:46:31 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums