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Author Topic: A-Z of AVIONICS  (Read 449358 times)

Offline Simulated

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« Reply #950 on: 30/01/2008 11:55:54 »
R is for Roscoe Turner

Roscoe Turner, one of aviation's most colorful individuals, was also one of the best pilots, if not the best, of the 1930s. Turner stood well over six feet (1.8 meters) tall, sported a neatly waxed mustache, and constantly wore a distinctive military-style uniform. His public demeanor was generally jovial, and for those who did not know him, it would have been easy to dismiss him as a boisterous clown. But Turner was anything but a buffoon. He was a serious racing pilot and made several significant contributions to aviation during his career. He was a barnstormer, a Hollywood stunt pilot, a multiple transcontinental speed record holder, and a multiple National Air Race winner. He also flew with a lion in his cockpit! Americans loved Turner because he was just the right combination of showman, daredevil, and talented pilot.

More here http://www.centennialofflight.gov/essay/Explorers_Record_Setters_and_Daredevils/turner/EX22.htm
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #952 on: 31/01/2008 19:14:27 »
T is for Terminal

An airport terminal is a building at an airport where passengers transfer between ground transportation and the facilities that allow them to board and disembark from airplanes.

 
The terminal of Baghdad International Airport, Iraq.
The terminal of Banjul International Airport, Banjul, The GambiaWithin the terminal, passengers purchase tickets, transfer their luggage, and go through security. The buildings that provide access to the airplanes (via gates) are typically called concourses. However, the terms "terminal" and "concourse" are sometimes used interchangeably, depending on the configuration of the airport.

Smaller airports have one terminal while larger airports have several terminals and/or concourses. At small airports, the single terminal building typically serves all of the functions of a terminal and a concourse.

Some larger airports have one terminal that is connected to multiple concourses via walkways, skybridges, or underground tunnels (such as Denver International Airport). Some larger airports have more than one terminal, each with one or more concourses (such as New York's La Guardia Airport). Still other larger airports have multiple terminals each of which incorporate the functions of a concourse (such as Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport).

Most airport terminals are built in a plain style. However, some, such as Baghdad International Airport, are monumental in stature, while others are considered architectural masterpieces, such as Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle airport near Paris or Terminal 5 at New York's JFK Airport. A few are designed to reflect the culture of a particular area, an example being the terminal at Albuquerque International Sunport in New Mexico, which is designed in the Pueblo Revival style popularized by architect John Gaw Meem.

It's also a good movie  :D
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #953 on: 01/02/2008 18:22:15 »
U-2 Dragon Lady

Tactical Reconnaissance




DESCRIPTION:
The U-2 spyplane was originally developed by the 'Skunkworks' division of Lockheed while working under strict secrecy. The revolutionary new plane was envisioned as a high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft for the Central Intelligence Agency and the US Air Force. The 'U' designation, normally used for an innocuous utility aircraft, was used as part of a campaign to keep the aircraft a mystery from prying eyes.
In order to further hide the U-2's true purpose, the first operational squadron was officially called a "Weather Reconnaissance" unit operated by NASA. The first two squadrons were based in Japan and Germany or England from which the aircraft flew numerous missions over the Soviet Union, China, Vietnam, and the Middle East. The U-2 also proved vital in 1962 when its pilots discovered the placement of nuclear missile bases in Cuba leading to the Cuban Missile Crisis. It was not until 1 May 1960 that the world learned the truth about the U-2 after one flown by Francis Gary Powers was shot down deep within the Soviet Union. Though Powers was later returned to the US in exchange for a Soviet spy, the U-2 never entered Soviet airspace again.

Attrition was high since the aircraft was so difficult to fly and other examples were shot down over China and Cuba. In light of these losses, a new model, the U-2R, entered production in 1968. The most recent version is the U-2S. Originally designated as the TR-1, the U-2S is an updated U-2R carrying an advanced Synthetic-Aperture Radar capable of scanning 35 miles within enemy territory while the aircraft remains in international airspace. The TR-1, U-2R, and U-2S can be differentiated from older U-2 variants by the large avionics pod mounted beneath each wing. The U-2S remains in service today and has seen extensive use over Iraq and Afghanistan.

Data below for U-2C, U-2R, and U-2S where indicated
Last modified 29 November 2005

...


 
« Last Edit: 02/02/2008 23:15:07 by iko »
 

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« Reply #954 on: 13/02/2008 14:05:42 »
V is for Theodor Von Kármán

Dr. Theodor von Kármán holds an important position among the contributors to aerodynamic theory, particularly in the area of supersonic flight. Known as “the father of supersonic flight,” he made major contributions to aviation and space technology, theoretical aerodynamics, and the application of theory to improve aircraft performance. He also helped develop the use of rocketry for creating weapons of defense.

As a young child in Hungary, von Kármán seemed destined for science. His father was a professor and his mother a descendant of well-known scholars. Born in 1881, Theodor's intelligence was first noticed at age 6 when he solved his older brother's complicated multiplication problems in his head before his brother could complete them on paper.

At age 9 he enrolled in an open education laboratory founded by his father that was referred to as “a nursery for the elite.” By the age of 22, von Kármán had graduated from Royal Joseph University in Hungary with a mechanical engineering degree and highest honors. He enrolled in the advanced study of mechanical engineering after serving his mandatory military service and received his doctorate under the tutelage of the famous aerodynamicist, Ludwig Prandtl.

I know it's pushing it, but V's a hard one.

http://www.centennialofflight.gov/essay/Theories_of_Flight/von_Karman/TH21.htm
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #955 on: 13/02/2008 18:27:00 »
Yes, Karman!

Karman Theodore von


Theodore von Kármán (1881–1963).



Professor of Aeronautics 1930–1949. First Director of GALCIT, 1930–1949. In 1926 von Kármán was invited to Caltech to give talks on aerodynamics, and review plans for the new wind tunnel. In 1928 he returned to Caltech for an exchange semester, and finally joined the Institute in 1929 as a research associate in aeronautics. In 1930, he was appointed professor of aeronautics and Director of GALCIT. Among his accomplishments were the first computation of drag for a supersonic projectile; application of dimensional analysis to turbulent flow, the log-law and Kármán constant for turbulent boundary layer velocity distribution (law of the wall); fundamental studies on turbulence; the discovery of the similarity law of transonic flow; and the use of stiffened panels in aircraft construction.
He spent most of his time in Washington after 1942. Stepped down as director in 1949 and became professor emeritus. In 1962, at age 81, he was awarded the first National Medal of Science, bestowed in a Whitehouse ceremony by President John F. Kennedy. On his characteristic of never declining a lecturing opportunity, he once joked "I can never pass up the opportunity to dominate the conversation for an entire hour."

from:   http://www.galcit.caltech.edu/history/index.html 




 

Offline iko

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« Reply #956 on: 13/02/2008 18:30:56 »
Vicious (circle)

...what's going on around HERE (A-Z)?

ikoD  [:o)]
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #958 on: 26/04/2008 10:56:13 »
YA-9A Northrop      (at the March Field Air Museum)




 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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« Reply #959 on: 27/04/2008 20:01:28 »
Electronic Attack Squadron [VAQ-130]
"Zappers"
 

Offline rosalind dna

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« Reply #960 on: 30/04/2008 16:20:28 »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andromeda_Galaxy



I think that it's a beautiful picture and I don't know why I thought of this Andromeda Galaxy but here it is.
 

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« Reply #960 on: 30/04/2008 16:20:28 »

 

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