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Author Topic: Is being fat in our genes?  (Read 2295 times)

Offline thedoc

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Is being fat in our genes?
« on: 14/07/2015 09:00:34 »
Researchers at Imperial College have tracked down a new gene involved in severe obesity and type 2 diabetes. Alex Blakemore tells the story.
Read a transcript of the interview by clicking here
or Listen to it now or [download as MP3]
« Last Edit: 14/07/2015 09:00:34 by _system »


 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Is being fat in our genes?
« Reply #1 on: 14/07/2015 16:03:50 »
It's my excuse, anyway.
 

Offline Pecos_Bill

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Re: Is being fat in our genes?
« Reply #2 on: 14/07/2015 20:42:57 »
"Call it the Amish paradox. An exercise science professor has discovered that a pocket of Old Order Amish folks in Ontario, Canada, has stunningly low obesity levels, despite a diet high in fat, calories and refined sugar -- exactly the stuff doctors tell us not to eat.

They're at a paltry 4% obesity rate, compared to a whopping 31% in the general U.S. population, which, as we all know, is getting fatter by the minute. This group of Amish manages to keep its overweight levels low despite a diet that includes meat, potatoes, gravy, cakes, pies and eggs. So what's their secret? Exercise, people. Exercise.

For starters, of the 98 Amish pedometer-wearing adults surveyed over a week, men averaged about 18,000 steps a day, women about 14,000. Most Americans do not come anywhere close to that, struggling to get in the recommended 10,000 steps a day." (1.)

The old order Amish call outsiders "English". Maybe you shouldn't be so "English".

Genetics, Hah! If you walk 18000 steps per day, it is highly unlikely you will be fat. I lost 20 pounds walking the Camino de Santiago from Seville to Santiago de Compostela. Good for the body, good for the soul.


(1.) http://articles.latimes.com/2004/jan/12/health/he-amish12
 

Offline Ethos_

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Re: Is being fat in our genes?
« Reply #3 on: 14/07/2015 22:22:04 »
Is being fat in our genes?

It is if you're overweight and happen to be wearing a pair of Levi's.

Sorry folks, I just couldn't help myself........................ ;D ;D ;D
« Last Edit: 14/07/2015 22:44:14 by Ethos_ »
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Is being fat in our genes?
« Reply #4 on: 15/07/2015 00:19:18 »
Exercise is unimportant compared with wind chill.

The maximum useful work output of a manual labourer is less than 3 megajoule/day, but you need about 6.5MJ/day from food to maintain your body weight when resting in a 20 degree environment. For an office worker, we are talking about 75 - 80% of your calorie intake being used simply to keep warm and maintain heart and brain function.

In an arctic environment, unless you are wearing full Eskimo kit, you can burn 30 MJ/day just to stay alive.

So here's what distinguishes the Amish and our grandparents (who, in the UK, ate 10 - 20% more calories than the present population): no central heating, and a fair amount of time outdoors in all weathers. 

I've often thought about opening a "gourmet cold camp" in Norway or Greenland, where you can eat well and lose weight, or end your life pleasantly by hypothermia.
 

Offline RD

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Re: Is being fat in our genes?
« Reply #5 on: 15/07/2015 00:47:40 »
"Call it the Amish paradox. An exercise science professor has discovered that a pocket of Old Order Amish folks in Ontario, Canada, has stunningly low obesity levels, despite a diet high in fat, calories and refined sugar -- exactly the stuff doctors tell us not to eat ... Genetics, Hah! 

Your point that exercise is they key to avoiding obesity may very well be true , but using the Amish data doesn't prove obesity isn't genetic as Amish are genetically isolated. They are not a representative-sample of the general population : gene(s) to avoid obesity could be over-represented in the [shallow] Amish gene-pool.
« Last Edit: 15/07/2015 00:53:27 by RD »
 

Offline Pecos_Bill

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Re: Is being fat in our genes?
« Reply #6 on: 15/07/2015 06:18:53 »
The chances of the Amish being of some genetically distinct clade of the human race cannot be dismissed nor can it be dismissed that they aren't obese because God loves them more than the other people. However - by Occam's razor - they are lean because they engage in strenuous farm labor six days a week and all year long.

When I went to Russia to teach English in 2003,   there were <<no>> fat people.  I, in fact, lost 30 pounds sharing their lives that winter. Now when the Russian students would return to Tomsk after a year's exchange in Vermont, they would all have blown up like a bull moose...until returning to quotidian Siberian life they thinned down again. Was that genetic? I think not.

I will put you another case. The Pima Indians living in southern California live a pretty normal sedentary American life. They suffer pronounced rates of obesity and type II diabetes. The Pima indians living across the border are dirt poor. They spend their lives eking out a bare living in daily toil growing corn and squash-- which is the major part of their diet. THESE Pima Indians are lean as whippets and Diabetes type II is virtually unheard off.

Same genes- different lifestyles and certainly different health risks.
 

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Re: Is being fat in our genes?
« Reply #6 on: 15/07/2015 06:18:53 »

 

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