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Author Topic: Varying speed of light?  (Read 1692 times)

Offline Fruityloop

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Varying speed of light?
« on: 05/08/2015 06:09:25 »
I am going to show what I believe is evidence that the speed of light isn't constant relative to all observers.  I obviously have no proof, just evidence from an argument.  But first I need to lay out a scenario... 
     Imagine that you are standing still and you are holding a stopwatch in your hand.  There are people in a line walking swiftly past you.  They are moving at a constant speed and are equally spaced apart from one another.  You start the stopwatch when one person reaches you and you stop it when the next person reaches you.  You note how long this took and you record this time as X.  You then start walking in the same direction as the people are walking past you, but you're not walking as fast as they are.  You do the same thing again...you start your stopwatch when a person passes you and you stop it when the next person passes you.
You note two things...
1) The people are passing you more slowly.  Relative to you their speed is decreased.
2) The time between people is greater than X.
Now you start walking towards the people and again you record the amount of time between people passing you.
Again two things are noted...
1) The people are passing you more quickly.  Relative to you their speed is increased.
2) The time between people is less than X.

All of this is simple and quite obvious.  Now we are going to replace you with the Earth and the people walking past you are going to be replaced by the instant of minimum brightness from an eclipsing binary star system.  If we find that the time between the instants of minimum brightness is greater when we are moving away from the star system and less when we are moving towards the star system, the logical conclusion we should come to is that the light is passing us more slowly when we are moving away from the stars and passing us more quickly when we are moving towards the stars.
http://calgary.rasc.ca/algol_minima.htm [nofollow]
Quote
In May and November, the Earth is moving at "right angles" to the line to Algol. During this time we see minima happening regularly at their 2.867321 day intervals. However, during August, the Earth is rapidly moving towards Algol at about 107,229 km/hr as explained on my How Fast Are We Moving? page. (The Earth moves approximately 202 times its own size in one day.) So in 2.867321 days the Earth moves about 7,379,039 km closer to Algol. But the varying light from Algol doesn't know this(emphasis added) - its light waves left Algol 93 years ago and are travelling at a constant speed. The result - we "catch a bunch of minima early" during August as shown on Chart 2. Exactly the opposite happens during February - the Earth is moving away from Algol that fast and it takes longer for the group of minima to reach us so we see them taking longer between events. How long? 7,379,039 km divided by the speed of light 299,792.458 km/sec is 24.61382 seconds - this rough calculation explains the deviations we see in Graph 2. So in May and November when we are not moving towards or away from Algol - the period seems constant. It is our rapid movement towards or away from the events in August and February that causes the timing differences.
When we are 'running away'... the time between minimums is 2.8675875347 days.
When we are 'running towards'... the time between minimums is 2.8670608912 days.
When we are 'standing still'... the time between minimums is  2.867321 days.

I realize the analogy isn't exact because the analogy is in a line and the actual Earth and star system is in 3D space.  However, if the binary star system were in the same plane as the Earth's orbit around the Sun I think we should expect similar results.
« Last Edit: 14/01/2016 08:05:51 by Fruityloop »


 

Offline Colin2B

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Re: Varying speed of light?
« Reply #1 on: 05/08/2015 14:12:56 »
the logical conclusion we should come to is that the light is passing us more slowly when we are moving away from the stars and passing us more quickly when we are moving towards the stars.
No, the solution is as described in the link you provided, the light travels different distances.
If you assume the light speed changes, what would you propose happens to Maxwell's Equations and the knock back onto Gauss' laws, Faraday's and Ampere's Laws?
 

Offline Fruityloop

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Re: Varying speed of light?
« Reply #2 on: 14/01/2016 08:03:02 »
Here's a technical paper in which the author is calling into question Einstein's SR.
It's an interesting read...

http://web.stcloudstate.edu/ruwang/eefinal.pdf [nofollow]
 
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Offline alysdexia

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Re: Varying speed of light?
« Reply #3 on: 25/01/2016 07:57:32 »
GPS deals with GR so you can dispose the paper out of hand.

SR is simply the result of the Doppler effect under finite celerity and GR is the result of Rindler events under finite celerity.
 

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Re: Varying speed of light?
« Reply #3 on: 25/01/2016 07:57:32 »

 

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