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Author Topic: This maths is correct, how can it be wrong?  (Read 10802 times)

Offline Thebox

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Re: This maths is correct, how can it be wrong?
« Reply #100 on: 10/09/2015 20:07:05 »


you can't equate any number of hours with any value of m/s. they have different units. didn't we go over this when you first joined the forum?? time ≠ speed!

yes we did go over this a while back, but regardless of how science defines it, arbitrary time is based on motion of the sun relative to the earth's spin, and also the dating of the big bang is based on expansion which is a distance travelled of mass from an observation point.

Time what we know is arbitrary and that is why a time dilation does not occur to anything that really changes time, it is nothing more than an arbitrary clock failure.




 

Offline Kenyonm

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Re: This maths is correct, how can it be wrong?
« Reply #101 on: 19/12/2015 20:57:05 »
Is probability a product of the human brain trying to order what is of course chaos? Is anything actually random or is it actually the outcome of a set of historic actions? Is everything going to be predictable in the future where computer processing speeds are as fast as light in the time to see a path with infinitely dense vision with an accuracy to be able to see the outcome. For example watch the lottery balls spinning around chaotically and then predict which balls will come out before they actually do.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: This maths is correct, how can it be wrong?
« Reply #102 on: 20/12/2015 14:05:27 »
Is probability a product of the human brain trying to order what is of course chaos?

Probability is the amount of something in something, i.e 1/6 explains there is 6 individual variants.

 
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Is anything actually random or is it actually the outcome of a set of historic actions?

Yes there is a proper random, but something like 1/6 is only semi-random dependent to time.





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Is everything going to be predictable in the future where computer processing speeds are as fast as light in the time to see a path with infinitely dense vision with an accuracy to be able to see the outcome. For example watch the lottery balls spinning around chaotically and then predict which balls will come out before they actually do.


No, you can't predict what exactly will come out but you can narrow it down to certain possibilities.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: This maths is correct, how can it be wrong?
« Reply #102 on: 20/12/2015 14:05:27 »

 

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