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Author Topic: How do photons behave in a rotating magnetic field?  (Read 2569 times)

Offline jaiii

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Hi.

We have a hollow toroidal core.
In the core are photons.

The core is placed in rotating magnetic field.

How do the photons behave?

Edit: protons→photons
« Last Edit: 11/09/2015 08:10:28 by chris »


 

Offline lightarrow

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Re: Photons in magnetic field
« Reply #1 on: 01/09/2015 13:30:01 »
We have a hollow toroidal core.
The core is a photon.
I don't think so.

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Offline jaiii

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Re: Photons in magnetic field
« Reply #2 on: 01/09/2015 13:44:27 »
Core is fill with PHOTONS

Photons will be rotate ?
 

Offline mathew_orman

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Re: Photons in magnetic field
« Reply #3 on: 02/09/2015 10:32:12 »
Photons will move from a source with speed of light in vacuum in straight lines only...
 

Offline jaiii

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Re: Photons in magnetic field
« Reply #4 on: 02/09/2015 11:35:29 »
If the toroidal core, is of a reflecting
materials will rotate photons in it?
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Photons in magnetic field
« Reply #5 on: 02/09/2015 12:57:02 »
I am confused about the original question:
Quote from: jaiii
The core is a photon.... How the protons behave?
Please clarify: are we talking about photons or protons?

If we are talking about photons, the Faraday effect can rotate the plane of polarization of photons. But this requires a transparent medium (ie the toroid is not hollow). It will not bend the light around in a circle. Optical fibers can bend light in a circle by using total internal reflection, but it does this without using magnetic fields.

If we are talking about protons, they do respond to magnetic and electric fields, and their path can be bent around in a circle. This effect is used in particle accelerators.


 
 

Offline jaiii

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Re: Photons in magnetic field
« Reply #6 on: 02/09/2015 13:14:53 »
We talking about PHOTONS in rotating magnetic field
 

Offline lightarrow

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Re: Photons in magnetic field
« Reply #7 on: 02/09/2015 14:51:49 »
Core is fill with PHOTONS

Photons will be rotate ?
But in your previous post you wrote something else, you wrote:
"We have a hollow toroidal core.
 The core is a photon".
You intend to shift from your original question and ask another one?
Then, please, reformulate it a bit better and more precisely.

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« Last Edit: 02/09/2015 14:54:46 by lightarrow »
 

Offline jaiii

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Re: Photons in magnetic field
« Reply #8 on: 02/09/2015 15:49:41 »
In my original question bugs because I been using Google Translate.

I will try once more.

In The hollow toroidal core coil are placed photons.

The coil creates a rotating magnetic field.

Photons will rotate at the core of the coil?
 

Offline Atomic-S

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Re: Photons in magnetic field
« Reply #9 on: 06/09/2015 05:48:40 »
To an excellent approximation, the photons should not be affected in any way by the field created by the coil, because of the principle of electromagnetic superposition.  The field itself is made of photons, but those are linearly independent of the others, and they ignore each other.
 

Offline Atomic-S

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Re: Photons in magnetic field
« Reply #10 on: 06/09/2015 08:03:38 »
Addition and correction:  What I just said, while descriptive of the dynamics involved . may not be the whole story as pertains to your question.  The rest of the story is that while the fields dynamically behave independently through superposition, they do not behave energetically independently,  because energy is proportional to the square of the field rather than linearly with it. The impact of that is that when photons enter a magnetic field, according to their collective wave nature the energy no longer resides in the manner it originally did. Originally, without the additional field, energy is proportional to the square of the electrostatic field strength plus the square of the magnetic field strength, both quantities being equal in the free wave, resulting in a uniform distribution of energy.  When the photons in the form of a wave enter the magnetic field, the magnetic field adds linearly to that in the wave, resulting, if they are parallel, in increase in parts of the wave and decreases in other parts, the square of which is nonuniform.  The implications of that are that the energy distribution is also no longer uniform. This is of interest if we attach to photons the concept of them having energy, suggesting that their distribution may no longer be uniform. However, the matter is further complicated by the fact that the "size" of each photon is not necessarily small compared to the wavelength, so we are not necessarily justified in concluding that the photons have redistributed themselves into varying densities in the sense that we would talk about gas densities. Each photon may well, and apparently does, occupy the full space available to the macroscopically visible wave. In other words, the whole question of photons as "particles" having specific locations is in some doubt, as is their very existence apart from a procedure to detect them individually. All of which of course considerably complicates the question of what a photon does while in the toroidally-generated field.  How do we know the photon exists apart from a process that detects it, and if it does not exist, how can we talk about what it is doing in the field?  To properly address the question, one would have to devise an experiment in which photons could be detected as such while in the field, the experiment being of such nature that it would not interfere with the behavior that we are trying to observe.  But unfortunately, it is the nature of quantum mechanics that any operation on a quantum system involves an interaction that affects the outcome in some way, limiting what is possible.  A further complicating issue is that if an oscillating or rotating field is being generated by the coil.  the period of that field, to have any sensible meaning, must be less than the time light takes to travel the length of the toroid.  But the photon, if it is confined "within" the toroid, must have a shorter wavelength than that, and will travel through the toroid faster than one cycle of the oscillating current.  This fact sort of negates the whole idea of trying to spin photons in an oscillating field.  they simply don't hang around long enough.  Of course, using facing mirrors or the like one might attempt to confine them for a longer period of time, but that introduces a new feature to the experiment whose effects are very likely non-negligible, considering that such reflections can affect the polarization states.  Quite frankly, the more I think about it, the whole question is substantially unanswerable unless the experimental realities involved can be fully examined.
 

Offline mathew_orman

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Re: Photons in magnetic field
« Reply #11 on: 06/09/2015 09:12:59 »
Any photon is only detectable when intersecting atomic matter and it is re emitted...
You cannot stop, slow, divert circulate photons it is electromagnetic field in linear motion in straight line at speed of c...
Magnetic field can only influence it indirectly trough intersection with atoms, see examples of magneto-optic effects on polarity of photons...
 

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Re: Photons in magnetic field
« Reply #11 on: 06/09/2015 09:12:59 »

 

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