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Author Topic: Is e=mc^2 the same as F=ma^2 ?  (Read 9177 times)

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Is e=mc^2 the same as F=ma^2 ?
« Reply #50 on: 28/09/2015 17:10:18 »
Never mind theory. Show me an example of two masses that do not attract one another. And don't confuse yourself with buoyancy, because that necessarily involves a third mass for which even you can't assign a polarity!
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is e=mc^2 the same as F=ma^2 ?
« Reply #51 on: 28/09/2015 17:31:44 »
Never mind theory. Show me an example of two masses that do not attract one another. And don't confuse yourself with buoyancy, because that necessarily involves a third mass for which even you can't assign a polarity!

All mass is attracted to mass because all mass contains both positive mass and negative mass, there is no mass that is not attracted to other mass. Polarity of mass is variate, thermodynamics allows this, Atoms have a stable equilibrium of negative and positive mass, add energy and the atom excites producing a greater positive mass repelling other atoms greater positive mass, this is why metal expands and contracts, when the energy gained is lost the atoms return to an equilibrium state of mass.

Ok below is a diagram courtesy  of google and a bitmap edit.

1.The ball rotates around the pole on a string , it does not matter what speed the ball rotates at , the contraction mechanism will always contract the length of the string to a point where the ball is touching the pole.  In earth's example almost touching the pole.

2.
The ball rotates around the pole on a fixed pole , it does not matter what speed the ball rotates at , the contraction mechanism will never contract the length of the fixed pole to a point where the ball is touching the pole.








« Last Edit: 28/09/2015 17:50:22 by Thebox »
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Is e=mc^2 the same as F=ma^2 ?
« Reply #52 on: 28/09/2015 22:50:09 »
More drivel Please provide an instance of gravitational repulsion.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is e=mc^2 the same as F=ma^2 ?
« Reply #53 on: 29/09/2015 00:46:53 »
More drivel Please provide an instance of gravitational repulsion.

When energy is added to air, the air becomes under an instant of gravitational repulsion, the earth is under constant gravitational repulsion off the Sun, the moon is under gravitational repulsion from the earth.

Metal expands because of gravitational repulsion, a lifter lifts because of repulsion.


The earth does the exact same thing in orbit of the sun as air does in our atmosphere and circulates by thermodynamic absorption and thermodynamic extraction having effect of the equilibrium off setting the positive and negative mass.

It is really simple to show , we already know what happens to a gas or air if we add energy, the gas expands, molecules pushing molecules away from each other.

By adding energy to air , the air gains positive mass that in effect cancels out the negative mass flow that is attracted to the positive mass of the core and ground.

Fire rises, fire is positive mass, burning embers rise.
A Thermocline will rise or sink dependent on input of energy.




« Last Edit: 29/09/2015 02:54:39 by Thebox »
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Is e=mc^2 the same as F=ma^2 ?
« Reply #54 on: 29/09/2015 15:00:10 »

By adding energy to air , the air gains positive mass that in effect cancels out the negative mass flow that is attracted to the positive mass of the core and ground.

My hot air balloon weighed exactly the same hot or cold, but only flew when it was hot.

Quote
Fire rises, fire is positive mass, burning embers rise.
Lavoisier showed that this was wrong.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is e=mc^2 the same as F=ma^2 ?
« Reply #55 on: 29/09/2015 20:22:52 »
Lavoisier showed that this was wrong.

I thought Lavoisier proved nothing is ever lost? 

Have you got a link to show that fire does not burn ''upwards'' and rises before it is dispersed?

A candles flame always points up even if I angle the candle. Fire does not burn horizontal , the flames are always vertical, a bit like a vertical spirit level.


« Last Edit: 29/09/2015 20:32:04 by Thebox »
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: Is e=mc^2 the same as F=ma^2 ?
« Reply #56 on: 29/09/2015 21:07:56 »
Please provide an example of negative gravitation. Your Nobel Prize awaits.

When it is trapped behind an event horizon and pointing inward toward a singularity?
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is e=mc^2 the same as F=ma^2 ?
« Reply #57 on: 29/09/2015 21:42:10 »


When it is trapped behind an event horizon and pointing inward toward a singularity?

asteroids in an asteroid belt or satellites?
 

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Re: Is e=mc^2 the same as F=ma^2 ?
« Reply #57 on: 29/09/2015 21:42:10 »

 

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