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Author Topic: Newtonian Time, Gravity, and Black Holes  (Read 1115 times)

Offline Wajideu

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Newtonian Time, Gravity, and Black Holes
« on: 16/09/2015 07:46:54 »
PREFACE

While explaining multidimensional rendering to a friend online and studying conic sections, a thought came through my head. If you sliced a 4 dimensional cone with a 3 dimensional plane, would you be able to create any regular manifold? Trying to picture this in my head, I came up with this example to visualize the 4th dimension involving a pair of ghosts. These ghosts cannot see or interact with each other in any way. As a scientific ghost, one of them might say "two ghosts cannot occupy the same space at the same time; that's just not possible.". Of course, while he's saying this, you are looking at him stand inside of the other ghost. Well, in a way, he's correct. The thing is that each ghost is existing in it's own space, shared by a space of greater dimension. If you stacked a bunch of pieces of paper neatly on top of each other; each with a red dot in the exact same location; it can be said that the red dots are all occupying the same 2d space.

Then I asked myself, "what would it look like to move through the 4th dimension?". Imagine 3 ghost cubes of different sizes, all occupying the same 3d space via the 4th dimension, and that you can only see one at a time. First, you see the largest cube. Then you move one unit through the 4th dimension and you see the medium sized cube. Then you move one more unit and you see the smallest cube. By moving through 4 dimensions, you perceive that the 3 dimensional object is changing. If such is the case, then couldn't the movement of everything in the universe be redefined in terms of it's velocity across the 4th dimensional axis? And furthermore, couldn't what we call time be just a measurement of distance from one point in 4 dimensional space to another? If so, then the equation for acceleration; a=d/t; could be redefined as aₓ₋₁=d₀ₓ₋₁/dₓ; where 'x' is the number of dimensions. At the very least, this statement is geometrically true.


EXPLANATION FOR GRAVITY

Imagine that you shoot a bullet through a few very thin layers of plywood, where each layer represents a separate 2 dimensional space within 3 dimensional space. As the bullet is passing through the wood, it will be exerting a force on each layer in both the X and Y directions relative to the size and speed of the bullet. The hole it leaves behind makes this clear as day. Well, according to Newton's laws of motion, for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. So, the bullet will have an equal amount of force exerted on it relative to the 2d plane of the wood. So, logically speaking, if a 4 dimensional bullet was shot through our ghost cubes, would the bullet not have a force exerted upon it in 3 dimensions? And because the amount of force required to accelerate an object is dependent upon it's mass; time would actually move slower for objects with greater mass. And this leads to something even more interesting...


BLACK HOLES WITHOUT HAWKING RADIATION

As is well known, energy cannot be created nor destroyed. However, what would happen if an object's mass became so great that it's relative time practically stopped? Well, for the rest of the universe that's still moving, the energy will seem to have vanished. We're riding the bullet that went through a few more boards than the other bullet and asking, "where'd the other bullet go?". Well, the bullet didn't just turn to dust and keep going through the board with us. It's way back there; stuck. In laymen's terms, a black hole would be where time slows to a stop; not a /dev/null of the universe or a giant wood chipper.


HOW THE FUTURE AFFECTS THE PAST

With a black hole being redefined, we can now more easily ponder about what would happen if you entered (and left) a black hole. The first thing we'd have to realize is that once we enter it, there's no coming back out. At least not in the same 3d space as we were on before. To do that, we would actually have to be moving even faster through the 4th dimension than what we were to both escape and catch up; then practically hop onto a speeding train. Even getting close to a black hole would drastically reduce the amount of force being exerted on you across the 4th dimensional axis and permanently set you a few moments in the past. So, once you're inside, your only option would be to exit the black hole at an angle. And when you do, your perception of time would only continue due to your own momentum as you would now exist in a universe of 4d bullet holes. You would not be able to see or hear anything. And even if you could, you wouldn't be able to interact with it. The damage is already done in the future, so all you can do is watch from the past. This may seem like a stretch, but there was actually a team of physicists at a university in Australia that recently proved that; on a quantum level; the future affects the past. Additionally, this would make any temporal paradoxes stemming from violation of causality impossible.


SUMMARY

Simply by factoring 4 dimensional movement into the equation, a lot of the puzzling problems in physics go away; and at least as far as I can tell, it doesn't require changing any of our current understandings aside from Hawking radiation which is still inconclusive.
« Last Edit: 16/09/2015 08:01:46 by JHawk.GW »


 

Offline Wajideu

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Re: Newtonian Time, Gravity, and Black Holes
« Reply #1 on: 16/09/2015 17:47:50 »
Expanding on this theory a bit:


GENERAL RELATIVITY

By moving through 4 dimensional space, you are exerting force in 4 dimensions. The first 3 dimensions of this force being exerted on an object would be perceived as gravitational force and the 4th would be perceived as time. However, it would also be exerting an outward force; ie. gravitational waves. Objects that move faster through 4 dimensional space would have their time compressed.
 

Offline Wajideu

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Re: Newtonian Time, Gravity, and Black Holes
« Reply #2 on: 20/09/2015 17:29:50 »
 Something I was pondering about earlier:

TIME WAVES

As an object passes through 4d space, it will exert a force in the opposite direction. Thus, faster moving objects would have their time compressed. This compression and decompression could produce time waves. The interference of these waves would mean there would be some points in 3d space where time would seem to flow faster or slower for a few moments. The strength of this effect though would depend on the amount of turbulence. Though, the existence of time waves would imply the existence of hypertime (5d+)


EDIT:
After a bit of googling, it seems that what I'm saying here parallels with time dilation in the theory of relativity; though in my theory the movement through 4d space (time) is the cause of gravitation, not the opposite. I should probably read on up relativity a bit more in case some of my theories are just repeating existing explanations; but I don't want to accidentally limit my thinking process here.
« Last Edit: 20/09/2015 17:49:17 by JHawk.GW »
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: Newtonian Time, Gravity, and Black Holes
« Reply #3 on: 20/09/2015 23:02:36 »
You make one important and very interesting point. However it is back to front. An object near to a black hole is moving into the future and not the past. The slowing of time means that the exterior universe is experiencing time faster. The object near the black hole skips all these events and if it were to manage to leave the vicinity of the black hole it would experience a type of time travel. Hawking and others discuss this. Your rejection of Hawking radiation is also misguided. You need to read up on the Beckenstein bound and especially the relationship of the Planck scale to Hawking radiation.
 

Offline Wajideu

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Re: Newtonian Time, Gravity, and Black Holes
« Reply #4 on: 21/09/2015 04:33:31 »
To re-explain; when you near a black hole, you'd first gain 4 dimensional momentum. As a result, your time would become compressed and thus you would experience it faster than the outside universe. But, once you pass the event horizon, the direction of the 4 dimensional force would reverse; and your time would decompress, slowing to a stop, or possibly even accelerating in the opposite direction.

The reason I brought up Hawking radiation here is that my theory explains a way in which the energy does not actually leave the system (time is a spacial, and aₓ₋₁=d₀ₓ₋₁/dₓ; therefore, no problems with entropy). Additionally, Hawking radiation is only accepted because it's the best explanation we have, despite it not having been proven.
 

Offline Wajideu

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Re: Newtonian Time, Gravity, and Black Holes
« Reply #5 on: 25/09/2015 04:38:32 »
Another thing I was just thinking about:


QUANTUM SUPERPOSITION

Expanding on my idea of the possibility of time waves and how 4D change is evidence of 5D hypertime; this got me thinking about how 5D acceleration would affect 3D objects. To help visualize this, I decided to instead study how 2D acceleration would affect a 0D object.

Imagine a 0D object as a circle. 1D acceleration of this object across a line of RGBRGBRGB would change the color of this circle to red (R), green (G), or blue (B). Now, lets define a fractal rule such that G must always follow R, B must always follow G, and R must always follow B which holds true regardless of how many dimensions exist. The expected states for the second dimension could be visualized as

RGBRGBRGB
GBRGBRGBR
BRGBRGBRG
RGBRGBRGB
GBRGBRGBR
BRGBRGBRG

If there is no 2D acceleration or the speed of the 2D acceleration is equivalent to the speed of the 1D acceleration, then the 0D object will perform the expected pattern. However, once you introduce physics into the equation, things get all wonky. There's 2/3rd chance that the next set of states will be:

GBRGBRGBR
BRGBRGBRG
RGBRGBRGB
GBRGBRGBR
BRGBRGBRG
RGBRGBRGB

and 1/3rd chance that the next set of states will be:

BRGBRGBRG
RGBRGBRGB
GBRGBRGBR
BRGBRGBRG
RGBRGBRGB
GBRGBRGBR

Now, if you were to consider time to be linear and constant, then you could easily predict exactly what the next values are going to be based on the 1st and 2nd dimensional speed. However, this is clearly not the case on the quantum level as shown via the double slit experiment.

So, let's consider for a moment that time waves did exist. Essentially, they are just higher-dimensional gravitational waves. Objects would be carried by the peaks of the interference pattern and they wouldn't move at a constant speed. There is a huge margin here for unseen and unpredictable interference. You would get strange patterns like RGRBGBRGB. This is the exact behavior seen in the double slit experiment when there is no observer.

So the question is not, "why does a particle behave like a wave when it's not being observed"; but "how does an observer affect a particle or the wave on which it's riding?". One possibility is that the observer is increasing the wavelength., thereby reducing the amount of interference and making the particle move in a straighter line. One way to test this would be to do the double slit experiment with a larger distance between the slits and panel being shot at; or to place the observer beside the target plate instead of the slits. In both cases, the interference pattern should reappear.
 

Offline Wajideu

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Re: Newtonian Time, Gravity, and Black Holes
« Reply #6 on: 21/10/2015 11:01:33 »
It's been quite some time since my last post, but I just had an interesting thought come to mind.


WHIRLPOOLS (EXPERIMENT)

While taking a bath to warm up in my apartment (after plugging in my heater nearly set my house on fire...), I was goofing around and realized that if I placed my hands in prayer position with my thumbs pointed upwards about 4 or 5 inches under the water, opened my hands quickly while keeping my wrists together, and then closing my hands a bit slower repeatedly, it'd form whirlpools on the surface of the water.

My guess about how this works is that when I opened my hands, the water was pulled in opposite directions, creating a downward current. Because my hands were in a v-shape, the downward current became curved:

<--- v --->

when the waves bounced back off the walls of the tub, it returned back bit slower. by coming close to matching the same speed of the inward waves when I closed my hands, it reinforced the downward current, making the whirlpool clearly visible on the surface of the water

---> V <---


WHIRLPOOLS (THEORY)

This unintentional experiment basically got me thinking about whether or not gravitational waves or time waves might interact in more complex ways. I'd imagine a 3 dimensional projection of a 4 dimensional (time wave) whirlpool would look very much like a black hole. In addition, this lines up with my prior theories about the existence of hypertime and how time is compressed the more you approach the event horizon of a black hole, but stops completely just past it (there's no water in the center of the whirlpool). It'd also support Steven Hawking's theory about black holes evaporating over time, and give an even more realistic explanation to what happens to the matter (once the whirlpool evaporates, all the stuff that was picked up just gets regurgitated back up to the surface).
« Last Edit: 21/10/2015 11:18:55 by JHawk.GW »
 

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Re: Newtonian Time, Gravity, and Black Holes
« Reply #6 on: 21/10/2015 11:01:33 »

 

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