The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?  (Read 6166 times)

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3164
  • Thanked: 47 times
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #50 on: 04/11/2015 11:43:38 »
Then we can work out distances and speeds etc.

Not until you have defined a unit of length.


A yard stick is a yard stick and is a constant yard, light slows down in a medium, it is not a constant. A distance is a constant, a yard stick is constant, there is nothing wrong with the stick.   
But to take into consideration, a yard stick is a yard relative to us, relative to a giant a yard is a dot.


If I was in a dense medium and you was in air we would measure two different values of light, there would be an inequality.


 

Offline alancalverd

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4728
  • Thanked: 155 times
  • life is too short to drink instant coffee
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #51 on: 04/11/2015 17:30:09 »
They did using sun dials and circles , 86400/360=240  that is where 24 hrs comes from. One full circle divided up into increments.  Even the hour clock finger travels a circle of distance equal to the earths spin.

You are confusing yourself. Solar time is measured by angle, not distance. A person on the equator travels about 25,000 miles per day. A person in Oslo travels about 8000 miles in the same time, and a person at the North Pole doesn't move at all, but their solar clocks are identical because their angular velocities are identical. 
 

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3164
  • Thanked: 47 times
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #52 on: 05/11/2015 08:27:55 »
They did using sun dials and circles , 86400/360=240  that is where 24 hrs comes from. One full circle divided up into increments.  Even the hour clock finger travels a circle of distance equal to the earths spin.

You are confusing yourself. Solar time is measured by angle, not distance. A person on the equator travels about 25,000 miles per day. A person in Oslo travels about 8000 miles in the same time, and a person at the North Pole doesn't move at all, but their solar clocks are identical because their angular velocities are identical.


I am not confusing myself that a distance is used to measure time whether it be by angle or anything else, you have to have two points to measure to make ''time''.


So time how we have it will always be equal to a distance travelled rather than time.


Think of it this way, when we are measuring anything we are measuring it whilst we are moving through space.
« Last Edit: 05/11/2015 08:35:13 by Thebox »
 

Offline alancalverd

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4728
  • Thanked: 155 times
  • life is too short to drink instant coffee
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #53 on: 05/11/2015 09:09:31 »
distance is used to measure time whether it be by angle or anything else,
Nonsense. Distance and angle are not the same. Prehistoric Man knew this when he built Stonehenge and similar trade calendars around the world: it take exactly the same time (one year) for the dawn sun to reappear at a given angle, regardless of latitude, but the distance travelled in that time can vary from zero to 8,760,000 miles depending on where you are.

By your arithmetic, 8,760,000 = 0, but our neolithic ancestors had a better grip on reality.

 

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3164
  • Thanked: 47 times
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #54 on: 05/11/2015 09:16:19 »
distance is used to measure time whether it be by angle or anything else,
Nonsense. Distance and angle are not the same. Prehistoric Man knew this when he built Stonehenge and similar trade calendars around the world: it take exactly the same time (one year) for the dawn sun to reappear at a given angle, regardless of latitude, but the distance travelled in that time can vary from zero to 8,760,000 miles depending on where you are.

By your arithmetic, 8,760,000 = 0, but our neolithic ancestors had a better grip on reality.


You will find it quite factual that time is measured by a rate, a rate is set between two points, two points have a distance, a shadow moves, a shadow moves a distance, history did not know about angles etc, they only  had night and day and a flat earth.

360/24=15 degrees per hr

look at a clock

3600*46=165600 meters = 15 degrees


But then when I do meters to miles


24*165600=3974400meters=2469.57767mile


somehow decimal points got displaced.


24,901 mile









« Last Edit: 05/11/2015 09:41:52 by Thebox »
 

Offline alancalverd

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4728
  • Thanked: 155 times
  • life is too short to drink instant coffee
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #55 on: 05/11/2015 09:37:38 »
You are wrong. Henges, pyramids, pendulums and cesium atoms only have one reference point. Timekeeping is about repetition, not amplitude. (Unless you are a drummer - a joke as old as music itself.)

How you count or divide that repetition is entirely arbitrary. There are no degrees on a digital clock, and the markings on a sundial are not evenly spaced.
 

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3164
  • Thanked: 47 times
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #56 on: 05/11/2015 09:45:23 »
You are wrong. Henges, pyramids, pendulums and cesium atoms only have one reference point. Timekeeping is about repetition, not amplitude. (Unless you are a drummer - a joke as old as music itself.)

How you count or divide that repetition is entirely arbitrary. There are no degrees on a digital clock, and the markings on a sundial are not evenly spaced.


A sundial is a 180 degrees device, you are wrong, you can not measure time without two reference points, a digital clock does have distance, by time the digits change from 1 second to 2 seconds, the one second has travelled 299 792 568 meters.



You are not considering every detail.


Ancient Egyptian's were fascinated with time in the hope of prolonging life, that is why time was invented in the first place, we are self aware of death. The great pyramid makes a brilliant clock, looking up from the inside to align bodies to the ''funnel''


 
« Last Edit: 05/11/2015 09:53:05 by Thebox »
 

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3164
  • Thanked: 47 times
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #57 on: 05/11/2015 10:04:29 »
This or some sort of science experiment of a geometric nature,



baptising babies or something in ''holy water''  or maybe they thought they were ingesting ''god'' a life giving potion.


« Last Edit: 05/11/2015 10:14:06 by Thebox »
 

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3164
  • Thanked: 47 times
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #58 on: 05/11/2015 10:10:29 »
or this

 

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3164
  • Thanked: 47 times
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #59 on: 05/11/2015 10:29:19 »
We build colliders they built pyramids to experiment with energy.


I did say anything in defence of science would be frivolous litigation, I did not say that lightly.


The' model of all models




« Last Edit: 05/11/2015 11:19:08 by Thebox »
 

Offline puppypower

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 561
  • Thanked: 43 times
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #60 on: 05/11/2015 12:18:33 »
An interesting affect, that appears to show the equivalence of time and distance, is found in photography. This is called motion blur. Motion blur is when the shutter speed of the camera is slower than the action speed. Since time is stopped in the final photo, and the speed difference is conserved; appears as the motion blur, time appears as uncertainty in distant. The motion blur or uncertainty in distance gives the brain the impression of motion, even with time stopped in the photo.

Heisenberg Uncertainty may be an example of more general affect based on the conversion of time potential to distance potential. This is not an artifact of measuring. In the photo below, if we look at the cycler we can see his position, but we can't tell his momentum, because he looks stationary. The scenery, on the other hand, appears to have momentum, but the motion blur make it hard to tell an exact position.

Since time is not considered a physical thing of tangible substance, when space-time contracts or expands only the imagination is moving. Since motion blur can trigger the imagination to give us the feeling of movement, with time=stopped, these two imaginary things are connected. In fact, motion blur suggests that space can stem from time; conservation.

 

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3164
  • Thanked: 47 times
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #61 on: 05/11/2015 12:31:46 »
An interesting affect, that appears to show the equivalence of time and distance, is found in photography. This is called motion blur. Motion blur is when the shutter speed of the camera is slower than the action speed. Since time is stopped in the final photo, and the speed difference is conserved; appears as the motion blur, time appears as uncertainty in distant. The motion blur or uncertainty in distance gives the brain the impression of motion, even with time stopped in the photo.

Heisenberg Uncertainty may be an example of more general affect based on the conversion of time potential to distance potential. This is not an artifact of measuring. In the photo below, if we look at the cycler we can see his position, but we can't tell his momentum, because he looks stationary. The scenery, on the other hand, appears to have momentum, but the motion blur make it hard to tell an exact position.

Since time is not considered a physical thing of tangible substance, when space-time contracts or expands only the imagination is moving. Since motion blur can trigger the imagination to give us the feeling of movement, with time=stopped, these two imaginary things are connected. In fact, motion blur suggests that space can stem from time; conservation.



Hmmm, motion blur is an observation difference of light relative to velocity and nothing to do with time.   Try something if you do not believe me, give yourself a watery eye, use an onion that works well, then shut one eye , look at you rmonito or something similar from a distance, squint your eye, use your finger to move your eye lids, look how can you can mirror the object in fresh air.
Your actually slowing down the inverted neutralised signal off the matter.
« Last Edit: 05/11/2015 12:33:39 by Thebox »
 

Offline alancalverd

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4728
  • Thanked: 155 times
  • life is too short to drink instant coffee
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #62 on: 05/11/2015 12:36:24 »
You clearly have no idea what you are talking about. Life is actually a lot simpler than you want it to be. I'll leave you to wallow in selfinduced complexity.
 

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3164
  • Thanked: 47 times
    • View Profile
Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #63 on: 05/11/2015 12:44:03 »
You clearly have no idea what you are talking about. Life is actually a lot simpler than you want it to be. I'll leave you to wallow in selfinduced complexity.

I clearly know what I am talking about, and you clearly  have no argument to the model, it is not me who has it wrong.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Can the speed of light be faster than time itself?
« Reply #63 on: 05/11/2015 12:44:03 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums