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Poll

Is the Copenhagen Interpretation correct

Yes. No experimental evidence has contradicted it.
2 (33.3%)
No. Quantum theory is incomplete.
4 (66.7%)

Total Members Voted: 6

Voting closed: 21/11/2015 00:52:59

Author Topic: Is the Copenhagen Interpretation correct interpretation of quantum mechanics?  (Read 10801 times)

Offline liquidspacetime

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It's the associated wave which creates the wave interference which alters the direction the particle travels.
 

Offline alancalverd

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In the video it's obvious the wave slows down as the particle interacts with the slits.

In the video, the particle does not "interact" with the slits - it just passes through, carried by the wave. If you remove the particle, you will find that the wave behaves in exactly the same way. Try it!
 

Offline liquidspacetime

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The particle often runs into the divider between the slits. When it does it and its associated wave slow down.
« Last Edit: 12/11/2015 01:12:27 by liquidspacetime »
 

Offline alancalverd

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Try full screen and freeze frame. You will see that the particle never touches the divider. Indeed it can't, because it is being carried by the wave, not the other way around, and if the wave amplitude was zero between the particle and the divider, the particle would fall into the "soup".

It's very pretty, but it's just mesoscopic fluid dynamics and nothing to do with quantum physics.
 
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Offline liquidspacetime

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As the particle interacts with the divider it slows down and so does its associated wave.
 

Offline alancalverd

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I can do no more than advise you to repeat the experiment without the particle. You will find that the wave behaves in exactly the same way. The particle is irrelevant to the wave. Fluid dynamics is not magic.   
 

Offline liquidspacetime

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I can advise you to watch the video and notice when the particle encounters the divider it slows down which causes its associated wave to slow down.
 

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