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Author Topic: Why should sea salt be preferable for a patient with liver disease?  (Read 5158 times)

Offline chris

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A man told me today that he has liver disease (though didn't define exactly what sort of liver disease) and that "two specialists" told him that sea salt would be better for him that normal table salt. Can anyone offer any explanation for this; I was unable to help.

Chris


 

Offline moonfire

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No, I can't, but I researched it when I first had problems with my Thyroid and it is much better than table salt...maybe iodine content is the issue?
 

Offline iko

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Moonfire's suggestion
seems to be confirmed
by a recent 'yahoo'
debate exactly on the
same issue.                http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20060614130539AA6AdJq
Table salt has iodine
added...


...
Under certain circumstances, i.e congestive liver disease, too much iodine can depress thyroid
functions, in which case taking higher amounts of iodine is contraindicated.  In contrast, supplementing
normal (RDA / RDI), or even lower amounts of iodine following long-standing iodine deficiency can
strangely enough trigger hyperthyroidism in some instances.
...
from:    http://www.acu-cell.com/sni.html

...unconfirmed data in an alternative med. website



Sea salt is supposed to have more Magnesium:

Hypertension induction in Dahl rats.

Flowers SW, Jamal IA, Bogden J, Thanki K, Ballester H.
University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Maplewood.

There is experimental and epidemiologic evidence that some minerals and trace elements play a role in hypertension. We designed an experiment in which salt and water sources were manipulated to examine the possible impact of this relationship. A strain of rats (Dahl rats) known to become hypertensive with sodium chloride ingestion was used to study the effect of salt source and water source on the induction of hypertension. The group on tap water and table salt had blood pressures (184 mmHg +/- 19) significantly higher than every other group in the experiment. The experimental animals receiving tap water plus table salt had the highest blood pressure levels, although they consumed the lowest quantity of sodium. Analysis of the tap water samples showed "soft water" by analysis of calcium and magnesium concentration. This could adversely affect blood pressure.
The relatively high magnesium concentration in sun evaporated sea salt may play a protective role in hypertension induction. The zinc and copper present in tap water may play an exacerbating role.

J Natl Med Assoc. 1990 Dec;82(12):837-40.



So we put together 'alternative' and orthodox meds.

iko
« Last Edit: 28/12/2006 12:10:01 by iko »
 

Offline chris

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I thought it might have something to do with hypertension, but I had overlooked magnesium. I suggested that it was down to increased potassium, but it sounds as though I'm on the right lines.

Chris
 

Offline iko

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...other bits for the
'Magnesium connection'...


Magnesium and Aging

Epidemiological studies provide compelling evidence.
The lower death rates from coronary heart diseases (CHD) in Japan, China, India, and Italy versus those in Europe and America point to differences in cholesterol and saturated fat consumption as being the primary causative factor.

Not to be forgotten, and perhaps even more critical, is the role of dietary salt in contributing to these differences in death rate.

In countries with lower CHD death rates, most of the magnesium comes from table salt that is derived from seawater through an evaporative process.

This type of table salt contains calcium, potassium, and large amounts of magnesium, in addition to the sodium. Table salt used by North Americans comes primarily from salt mines. As a result of being washed with hydrochloric acid and recrystallization, this purified salt contains almost pure sodium chloride. The Japanese consume 10 grams of ocean salt a day. This provides approximately 1500 mg of magnesium. This is almost four times the magnesium recommended in the RDA and five times more than the average American gets. People from the countries using sea salt suffer a higher incidence of hypertension and stroke (probably due to the higher sodium intake) but lower rate of CHD (probably due to their higher magnesium intake). With increasing use of pure sodium chloride in these countries over the past 20 years, it is interesting to note that the incidence of CHD has increased accordingly.




for the complete issue click down here:

http://www.drlam.com/A3R_brief_in_doc_format/1999-No3-MagnesiumandAging.cfm



 

Magnesium Content of Food

Food            Magnesium (mg)

Pumpkin seeds, 1/4 cup roasted   303
Almonds, 1/2 cup      238
Soy nuts, 1/2 cup      196
Cashews, 1/2 cup      157
Tofu, firm, 1/2 cup      128
Peanuts, 1/2 cup      125
Chili with beans, 1 cup      115
Molasses, 2 Tbl         100
Wheat germ, toasted, 2 Tbl   90
Unsweetened chocolate, 1 oz   88
Sunflower seeds, 1/4 cup   82
Halibut, baked, 3 oz.      78
Swiss chard, cooked, 1/2 cup   75
Spinach, 1/2 cup cooked      66
Black beans, 1/2 cup      60
Oatmeal, 1 cup cooked      56
Peanut butter, 2 Tbl      51
Baked potato with skin, 1   55
Cereal, raisin bran, 1 oz.    48
Low fat yogurt, 1 cup      43
Milk, nonfat, 1 cup      28
Chicken, breast, 3 oz.       25
Green peas, cooked, 1/2 cup   23


from:   http://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu/nutrition/factsheets/magnesium.html
« Last Edit: 21/01/2007 12:24:28 by iko »
 

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