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Author Topic: Is It possible to re-heat a hot -water bottle in the microwave ?  (Read 16878 times)

neilep

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Is It possible to re-heat a hot-water bottle in the microwave ?....

or shall I play safe and just refill with fresh boiled (not boiling) water ?
There are NO metal components ...I presume the rubber is Vulcanized !!

For the the record, I would probably refill with freshly boiled water anyway but just thought I'd ask anyway

Karen W.

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I don't know, Rubber may not fair so well in the microwave. I would excercise caution anyways!

Did you hurt yourself again sneezing??? LOL

neilep

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I don't know, Rubber may not fair so well in the microwave. I would excercise caution anyways!

Did you hurt yourself again sneezing??? LOL

Thanks Karen Mam....''I bought a dog...called it  'Caution ' and have exercised it !!....



The hot water bottle is for wifey actually......she has back ache !!..ho hum !!..


realmswalker

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i heated water bottles in the microwave once.
I suggest removing paper on the bottle if you must (it has caught fire on me before)
and do not suggest drinking it (there is the controversy over plastic particles leaching into the water)
 besides the bottle might melt sort of, definently do not leave the cap on when its in the microwave unless u want a water bomb, and exercise caution if u must do that.

daveshorts

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Also be careful about superheating the water, so it will suddenly boil when you pick it up. Make sure the neck is pointing anywhere near you when you pick it up etc.

ROBERT

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Is It possible to re-heat a hot-water bottle in the microwave ?....

or shall I play safe and just refill with fresh boiled (not boiling) water ?
There are NO metal components ...I presume the rubber is Vulcanized !!

For the the record, I would probably refill with freshly boiled water anyway but just thought I'd ask anyway

There is a very real risk that microwaving the water in would turn it to steam, causing the rubber bottle to expand and possibly burst, showering you with boiling water and steam. 

There are heat pads which are designed to be heated in the microwave..
http://www.electro-therapy-manufacturer.com/hot-and-cold-therapy/heat-pack.htm

Karen W.

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Is It possible to re-heat a hot-water bottle in the microwave ?....

or shall I play safe and just refill with fresh boiled (not boiling) water ?
There are NO metal components ...I presume the rubber is Vulcanized !!

For the the record, I would probably refill with freshly boiled water anyway but just thought I'd ask anyway

There is a very real risk that microwaving the water in would turn it to steam, causing the rubber bottle to expand and possibly burst, showering you with boiling water and steam. 

There are heat pads which are designed to be heated in the microwave..
http://www.electro-therapy-manufacturer.com/hot-and-cold-therapy/heat-pack.htm

Those micrawaveable heat pads are wonderful and some smell so good, with herbs etc.I just tried one for your back and shoulders..! Nice very nice!!!
The ones I tried, you spritz with water and microwave. It holds the heat for around 45 minutes to 1 hour

ROBERT

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Microwavable "Hot Water" bottles  (in the UK)

Quote
Hotties Safety Information
Hotties range of microwave hot water bottles have now been sold safely and successfully in the UK and Europe for ten years. In that time, no significant injuries have occurred from the use of Hotties, and the company has not had to meet any product liability claims. This marks a considerable achievement, particularly, in the existing commercial and claim culture.

Hotties safety record should also be viewed in the context of considerable beneficial use by the elderly, infirm, and disabled. It is also an achievement of incremental safety in the context of the conventional hot water bottle market. The DTI's latest, (website June 11th 2004), HASS and LASS statistics indicate that 1210 accidents involving hot water bottles required attendance at hospital A and E departments over a twelve month period. Of these,42 were classed as serious and requiring in-patient care. A further 9456 incidents were classified as kettle related. A proportion of which undoubtedly involved the filling of hot water bottles. It is further estimated that up to 30,000 minor scalds are caused each year by hot water bottle usage.

How has Hotties achieved this long term safety record?
From the outset, Hotties were designed with safety as the paramount consideration. We understood that people would inevitably make mistakes in programming their microwaves, and that, instances of overheating would occur. We also realised that the basic physics involved meant that to attempt to design a product that would not fail was dangerous nonsense. Further, we soon came to realise that many of the people who derived greatest benefit from Hotties were the most vulnerable.

Therefore, Hotties were designed to fail safe if over heated, and to fail before dangerous temperatures and pressures could be reached.

Hotties in use
At Hotties we recognise that a very small proportion of consumers, despite comprehensive instructions, will overheat their Hottie, either by not understanding their microwave oven, or by mistake, experimentation, or abuse.

Hotties materials and seals are engineered to fail-safe, without dangerous ballooning or explosive failure. One or other seals will part before dangerous pressures are reached. This will be preceded by a controlled expansion of the Hottie, which acts as a fail safe indicator..

Hotties maintains a Customer Help line to assist consumers with getting the best out of their Hotties. (08702 415907).

Over 1,000,000 Hotties packs have now been sold.

http://www.hotwaterbottles.net/hotwaterbottlessafety.php

I suspect that the substance in these microwavable "hot water" bottles is not actually water,
 but some liquid/gel with a higher boiling point than water.

 
« Last Edit: 08/01/2007 17:56:09 by ROBERT »

daveshorts

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Last time I looked into them they were filled with a wax that melts when heated in the microwave. There is a lot of energy released as the wax crystalises so it can store a lot of heat without getting too hot.

DrN

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I have one of those herbal filled ones, and it really doesn't heat up very well. am I not doing it for long enough? Its been relegated to the bottom of my wardrobe in favour of a good-ole rubber one (with a furry cover!)

I've done that super-heating thing before .. it hurt  :-'( be very careful!

I'm seeing a pattern in some of my recent posts. maybe I should start a new topic about injuries obtained at work  :-\

Karen W.

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Microwavable "Hot Water" bottles  (in the UK)

Quote
Hotties Safety Information
Hotties range of microwave hot water bottles have now been sold safely and successfully in the UK and Europe for ten years. In that time, no significant injuries have occurred from the use of Hotties, and the company has not had to meet any product liability claims. This marks a considerable achievement, particularly, in the existing commercial and claim culture.

Hotties safety record should also be viewed in the context of considerable beneficial use by the elderly, infirm, and disabled. It is also an achievement of incremental safety in the context of the conventional hot water bottle market. The DTI's latest, (website June 11th 2004), HASS and LASS statistics indicate that 1210 accidents involving hot water bottles required attendance at hospital A and E departments over a twelve month period. Of these,42 were classed as serious and requiring in-patient care. A further 9456 incidents were classified as kettle related. A proportion of which undoubtedly involved the filling of hot water bottles. It is further estimated that up to 30,000 minor scalds are caused each year by hot water bottle usage.

How has Hotties achieved this long term safety record?
From the outset, Hotties were designed with safety as the paramount consideration. We understood that people would inevitably make mistakes in programming their microwaves, and that, instances of overheating would occur. We also realised that the basic physics involved meant that to attempt to design a product that would not fail was dangerous nonsense. Further, we soon came to realise that many of the people who derived greatest benefit from Hotties were the most vulnerable.

Therefore, Hotties were designed to fail safe if over heated, and to fail before dangerous temperatures and pressures could be reached.

Hotties in use
At Hotties we recognise that a very small proportion of consumers, despite comprehensive instructions, will overheat their Hottie, either by not understanding their microwave oven, or by mistake, experimentation, or abuse.

Hotties materials and seals are engineered to fail-safe, without dangerous ballooning or explosive failure. One or other seals will part before dangerous pressures are reached. This will be preceded by a controlled expansion of the Hottie, which acts as a fail safe indicator..

Hotties maintains a Customer Help line to assist consumers with getting the best out of their Hotties. (08702 415907).

Over 1,000,000 Hotties packs have now been sold.

http://www.hotwaterbottles.net/hotwaterbottlessafety.php

I suspect that the substance in these microwavable "hot water" bottles is not actually water,
 but some liquid/gel with a higher boiling point than water.

 

I did not know they made hot water bottles with anything except a lid to fill them with water.. This is interesting.. I wonder if these you refer to are sold here in the US?

I am going to check the stores and see... very interesting..

 

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