The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: What happens to an egg sent high into the atmosphere on a balloon?  (Read 1159 times)

Offline Brennan.g.johnson

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
I have just launched a payload this past week in a high altitude balloon launch conducted by the Univeristy of North Dakota. Inside of the payload, I had a fresh, large chicken egg with a GoPro and a small homemade light to see inside of the box to observe what happens to the egg on the way up and back down. It turns out that it did not explode and that it had partially frozen. I have 1700 pictures of the same egg. I know that the egg got the full effect of the atmosphere because I poke four 3/8" holes around the egg chamber and also, during the launch, right after take off, a large hole (1 1/2" in diameter) was made after a collision with another payload. The egg made it up to 90,000 feet (in the stratosphere.) 1 day after the launch, while the egg was still fresh (kept at constant refrigeration,) we cracked it open to see what had happened to the insides. We observed that the yolk did not change in thickness or texture, compared to a control, but the albumen changed into one thick gel-like substance. It was still a clear color and it was still somewhat moist. What happened to the albumen? Did the albumen cook somewhat under the severe pressure drop? Or did the solar radiation cook it partially?
« Last Edit: 19/12/2015 11:19:15 by chris »


 

Offline RD

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8122
  • Thanked: 53 times
    • View Profile
Re: Pressure vs. egg
« Reply #1 on: 26/11/2015 02:05:12 »
...  the albumen changed into one thick gel-like substance. It was still a clear color and it was still somewhat moist. What happened to the albumen? ...

Dehydration ? ...


http://www.societyofrobots.com/space_balloon_humidity_test.shtml
« Last Edit: 26/11/2015 02:08:08 by RD »
 
The following users thanked this post: Brennan.g.johnson

Offline chris

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 5334
  • Thanked: 65 times
  • The Naked Scientist
    • View Profile
    • The Naked Scientists
Out of interest, why were you doing this?
 

Offline chiralSPO

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1867
  • Thanked: 143 times
    • View Profile
Re: Pressure vs. egg
« Reply #3 on: 19/12/2015 12:48:48 »
...  the albumen changed into one thick gel-like substance. It was still a clear color and it was still somewhat moist. What happened to the albumen? ...

Dehydration ? ...

Eggs are designed to hold water in the most arid conditions on Earth (even Antarctica). My best guess would be that freezing partially denatured the albumin. I doubt that radiation would have that much effect even at that altitude, but this is just a hunch...
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Pressure vs. egg
« Reply #3 on: 19/12/2015 12:48:48 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums