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Author Topic: Does the sky have gates where the rockets pass through to space?  (Read 3360 times)

Offline pharmacist2030

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I read in an article that there are gates in the sky where astronauts Should locate before travelling to space because the sky is closed and these gates are the passage to space therefore, the launching of rockets takes place in specific places where these gates are located. I would like to know if this is scientifically true or it is just a hoax? And if it is true, what is the evidence?!


 

Offline alancalverd

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Utter drivel.
 

Offline Colin2B

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It may be a confusion of terminology.
A spacecraft is being aimed to arrive at a certain point in space eg intercept the moon orbit, and there are ideal times to do this to give minimal flight times and fuel consumption. The period of time between the earliest and latest possible launch times is called the launch window. Engineers also refer to such timings as gates, but usually for shorter times.
Someone has heard these terms used and made a very simplistic assumption without thinking through.
 

Offline pharmacist2030

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Thanks for the clarification. That means that the spaceship can be launched from any place on Earth. According to the article I read that Russia can't launch spaceships from Russia as these gates or Windows are not there so it has to launch from Khazakhstan as these gates or so called windows are there but my instinct says that it is all hoax.
 

Offline Colin2B

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Again, I suspect the author is not thinking this through or presenting it well.
The best launch sites are near the equator because the earth is spinning faster there (surface speed) and this gives a rocket a significant boost compared to near the poles and so saves fuel. Nearer the poles the size of rocket compared to payload may make it impossible to achieve a launch.
 

Offline Bill S

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Quote from: Alan
Utter drivel.

Reminds me of a joke I heard on an Open University summer school.

A geologist takes a trip in his hot air balloon to photograph the Fens (an extensive area of flat country).  During the flight a fog rolled in from the North Sea.  The geologist descended very slowly and carefully.  Suddenly he became aware of the head of a cyclist just below his basket.  The following exchange took place:

Geologist:  “Excuse me”.

Cyclist (wobbling dangerously):  “Er, hello”.

Geologist: “Can you tell me where I am?”.

Cyclist: “Yes, you’re in a basket suspended below a hot-air balloon”

Geologist: “Thanks; you must be a physicist”.

Cyclist: “How did you know that?”

Geologist: “because your answer is absolutely right, but totally useless”, 
 
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Offline alancalverd

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Bless yew, boy, but we ent tot'ly dumb 'ere in the Fens. When I were a lad, it were an accountant. Or the bloke in the basket complained that he was going to be late for a meeting and the bloke on the ground said "you must be a manager......"

But full marks to Colin for spotting that gates = windows. Indeed if you want to rendezvous in orbit with minimal fuel burn, your window can be as narrow as what them there engineers calls a gate.
 

Online evan_au

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Another possible interpretation is "Space Port" ≡ "Space Gate" (and maybe it is more literal than that in Russian??).

Countries like to keep their expensive (and often secret) space probes in:
  • Areas they control
  • With the right infrastructure (which takes years to construct)
  • With a clear path over areas with a low population
  • Aligned to put the satellite into a useful orbit

So although you could launch a satellite from anywhere on the Earth, in practice, some parts are better than others.
  • The French launch from Khorou, over the ocean. This is almost on the equator, which is ideal for geosynchronous satellites.
  • NASA often launches its civilian satellites from Florida, over the sea. It is not so close to the equator, so it takes more fuel to reach geosynchronous orbit. However, Earth-observing satellites need to go into a polar orbit, so Florida is not so useful either. US Military satellites are often launched from Vandenberg air force base in California, presumably because it is more secure.
  • The Russians used to control Kazhakstan, and it has a low population of Russians. Because much of Russia is near the North Pole, an equatorial orbit is not so useful, so they often launch satellites with high inclination and high eccentricity, like the Molniya orbit.
  • There is some international tension with space launches from China and North Korea, which tend to pass over parts of Japan.

During the cold war, the passion to install ICBM rockets everywhere meant that small launch facilities were built all over the world, including on ships and submarines, ready to launch at a few minutes notice.

I noted that the Gravity Probe B spacecraft needed to be in such a specific orbit that the launch window was only 1 second long!
 
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Offline Thebox

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The op is on about the firmament I think, and the said nuclear blasts to open up a gate in the firmament. ...
 

Online evan_au

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Quote from: Thebox
nuclear blasts to open up a gate in the firmament
The Partial Nuclear Test Ban Treaty of 1963 outlawed nuclear explosions in the atmosphere or outer space, and considerable monitoring is in place to detect violations.

There have been numerous space probes launched since then, so we can be sure that nuclear blasts are not required to reach outer space.

There have been nuclear-powered spacecraft, including the current Mars Curiosity rover, and most missions to the outer Solar System. It is likely that long-term manned missions to the planets will require nuclear power. But nuclear explosions are not a desired byproduct of these applications.
 

Offline pharmacist2030

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What could be the consequences of a nuclear explosion in the atmosphere? How it could affect the Earth? Is it going to disrupt all the signal transmission beside its disastrous environmental effect?
 

Offline chiralSPO

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What could be the consequences of a nuclear explosion in the atmosphere? How it could affect the Earth? Is it going to disrupt all the signal transmission beside its disastrous environmental effect?

Check out Starfish Prime (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starfish_Prime) which happened the year before upper atmosphere and space tests were banned.

Frequent nuclear explosions in the upper atmosphere or in sub lunar altitudes would definitely have dramatic effects on signal transmission due to the EMP generated with each explosion, and the energetic particles released.
 

Offline Thebox

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Quote from: Thebox
nuclear blasts to open up a gate in the firmament
The Partial Nuclear Test Ban Treaty of 1963 outlawed nuclear explosions in the atmosphere or outer space, and considerable monitoring is in place to detect violations.

There have been numerous space probes launched since then, so we can be sure that nuclear blasts are not required to reach outer space.

There have been nuclear-powered spacecraft, including the current Mars Curiosity rover, and most missions to the outer Solar System. It is likely that long-term manned missions to the planets will require nuclear power. But nuclear explosions are not a desired byproduct of these applications.


I know that LOL, I have never ever observed a rocket launch smashing into a ''roof'', or a fallen meteor being so accurate in its flight it could find a hole to slip through.

 

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