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Author Topic: Is this maths meaningful?  (Read 1085 times)

Offline Thebox

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Is this maths meaningful?
« on: 02/12/2015 09:15:49 »
f(t'{y})=∞*sin(t'{λx})

f(t'{y})=∞*cos(t'{λx}) this is maths?

I am working quite hard to learn maths, I don't seem to get much help :(

added pic




f(c)=σ


I conclude white light or clear light is not a mix of random frequencies, but rather a random frequency .
« Last Edit: 02/12/2015 09:58:57 by Thebox »


 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Is this maths meaningful?
« Reply #1 on: 02/12/2015 12:02:37 »
No. Assuming you want ∞ to  mean infinity, beware of involving it in any equation. If you want it to mean something else, use another symbol.

Similarly t' can mean t + Δt or anything else you define it as, and σ is usually reserved for standard deviation, unless you define it as something else.

Always begin with your definitions, so people know what you are talking about. As my navigation instructor used to say "start from where you are, then you won't get lost before you take off". When you have landed, tell the passengers where you are - i.e. what you have demonstrated by  your mathematics. Maths is the way we plot our course from one physical observation to another!

And remember cos2x + sin2x = 1. This is a great help in checkng your equations and graphs.

For what it's worth, white light is a continuous spectrum. You can't generate it from the harmonics of a single frequency.   
 
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Offline Thebox

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Re: Is this maths meaningful?
« Reply #2 on: 02/12/2015 12:14:55 »
No. Assuming you want ∞ to  mean infinity, beware of involving it in any equation. If you want it to mean something else, use another symbol.

Similarly t' can mean t + Δt or anything else you define it as, and σ is usually reserved for standard deviation, unless you define it as something else.

Always begin with your definitions, so people know what you are talking about. As my navigation instructor used to say "start from where you are, then you won't get lost before you take off". When you have landed, tell the passengers where you are - i.e. what you have demonstrated by  your mathematics. Maths is the way we plot our course from one physical observation to another!

And remember cos2x + sin2x = 1. This is a great help in checkng your equations and graphs.

For what it's worth, white light is a continuous spectrum. You can't generate it from the harmonics of a single frequency.

Thank you, the reason I don't put any description is for the reason that if yourself or anyone else can read the maths, it must be the correct way and that would mean I was getting it correct. I do forget one symbol can mean different things.

I will be back soon to try and denote my equation, and yes infinite was infinite.

 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is this maths meaningful?
« Reply #3 on: 02/12/2015 15:19:46 »
f(t'{y})=∞*sin(t'{λx})

(t'{y})=∞*cos(t'{λx}

The function of the derivative of time Y  is equal to  an infinite variance of constant linearity time X


I want to explain that x is a continuous linearity of time, and i want to explain that Y is a single time wave but the distance between the troths are random .


this







« Last Edit: 02/12/2015 15:25:53 by Thebox »
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Is this maths meaningful?
« Reply #4 on: 02/12/2015 16:10:19 »


, and yes infinite was infinite.



in which case the equations are meaningless.

Quote
I want to explain that x is a continuous linearity of time, and i want to explain that Y is a single time wave but the distance between the troths are random .

Then just say "y(t) is random". There's nothing more you can say or do about it, mathematically or physically.

There's a difference between "white noise", which is random and has an infinite spectrum of constant power density, and white light, which has a limited spectrum defined by the response of the human eye to electromagnetic radiation.

You might be interested in autocorrelation functions as a means of expressing randomness, but I don't see any relevance to white light.

 
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Offline Thebox

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Re: Is this maths meaningful?
« Reply #5 on: 02/12/2015 18:00:37 »


, and yes infinite was infinite.



in which case the equations are meaningless.

Quote
I want to explain that x is a continuous linearity of time, and i want to explain that Y is a single time wave but the distance between the troths are random .

Then just say "y(t) is random". There's nothing more you can say or do about it, mathematically or physically.

There's a difference between "white noise", which is random and has an infinite spectrum of constant power density, and white light, which has a limited spectrum defined by the response of the human eye to electromagnetic radiation.

You might be interested in autocorrelation functions as a means of expressing randomness, but I don't see any relevance to white light.

A big thank you, this is my poker paradox.

''In statistics, the autocorrelation of a random process describes the correlation between values of the process at different times, as a function of the two times or of the time lag. Let X be some repeatable process, and i be some point in time after the start of that process. (i may be an integer for a discrete-time process or a real number for a continuous-time process.) Then Xi is the value (or realization) produced by a given run of the process at time i. Suppose that the process is further known to have defined values for mean μi and variance σi2 for all times i. Then the definition of the autocorrelation between times s and t is''


I think it is related to white light has well but that's a different story.
 

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Re: Is this maths meaningful?
« Reply #5 on: 02/12/2015 18:00:37 »

 

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