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Author Topic: Is Hawking radiation real? Did it really mater Before the Big Bang?  (Read 1032 times)

Offline Space Flow

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The vacuum of spacetime is responsible for the hypothetical Hawking Radiation.
Spacetime is defined by the apparent separation between any two bodies of Matter.
If there was no Matter left outside the Event Horizon of a Black Hole, how then can we define the existence of spacetime, to allow for Vacuum fluctuations?
When a Black Hole has finished devouring all the available Matter, that means it has devoured ALL the available Matter, including any Matter that may or may not have it's creation origins in Hypothetical Hawking Radiation.
There is nothing left to be separated by Spacetime.
As such Spacetime looses any defining characteristics and can no longer exist.

No more hypothetical Hawking radiation.

Only a Universe in a Black Hole.

Not evaporating. In fact as the last of whatever was considered the last separate bit of matter reaches the event horizon of the last Black Hole, which up to this point contains all the angular momentum of the Universe in it's spin rate, spacetime should immediately cease to exist.
With the sudden disappearance of Spacetime, the rapidly rotating Black Hole has nothing to relatively rotate to, comes to an immediate stop transferring all that Kinetic Energy, into whatever state all the matter of the Universe was in. (Quarks or whatever) This whole sequence happening from one planck moment to the next.

Result?  A "Big Bang".

Thus restarting Timespace.(Spacetime)

« Last Edit: 21/12/2015 07:56:34 by Space Flow »


 

Offline evan_au

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Quote from: Space Flow
When a Black Hole has finished devouring all the available Matter
The expansion of the universe means that the whole universe will probably not be devoured by a single humungous black hole.

If you wait long enough, the black hole in the center of each galaxy will devour most of the matter in the galaxy. If you wait even longer, gravitational radiation will cause the galactic black holes within a galaxy cluster to eventually merge. This black hole may even absorb much of the Dark Matter in the Cluster (depending on exactly what Dark Matter is!).

But different galactic clusters are not gravitationally bound, and so their black holes will not devour each other.

When you take into account Dark Energy, the long-term fate of the universe may consist of many large black holes, diverging from each other, and slowly evaporating through Hawking radiation. But there are many theories to choose from!
 

Offline Space Flow

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Evan your probably right.
But just as a thought experiment, see the time when only these Supermassive Black Holes are left, so the only reference frame you can consider, is that from the event horizons of Black Holes. Remember that Spacetime is a ratio of Space and Time. From this relativistic reference frame, space is not very big at all and collapsing fast. Every thing that comes in is so heavily blue-shifted, and it is Gravitationally bound to every other Black Hole in this rapidly contracting Universe.
If our frame of reference today even existed then by our accounting of space and time this would take a googolplex of years.
To the point of view from an event horizon, because of time dilation, the entire life of our sun, including the cooling of the white dwarf was but a momentary spark.
The Universe does not look the same at almost the speed of light.
We could without modifying any of our known physics today, show a possible outcome of one final Black Hole.
Relativity could rescue the Universe from the big fall apart.
Despite Hawking's defeatist attitude.
 

Offline Space Flow

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But different galactic clusters are not gravitationally bound, and so their black holes will not devour each other.
I think you might find that Gravitationally Bound has a much bigger meaning in the grand scheme of things. And a much bigger reach.
« Last Edit: 26/12/2015 00:07:35 by Space Flow »
 

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