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Author Topic: Is it possible to separate electric charges (protons and electrons)?  (Read 9678 times)

Offline thebrain13

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Can we ever completely seperate electric charge? I mean can we actually ever isolate electrons or protons without having their respective opposite charges nearbye aka polarization. or is the strength of charge just to strong to do it significantly.
« Last Edit: 17/02/2007 22:08:43 by chris »


 

Offline Batroost

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Look at your Television - assuming that it isn't an LCD or plasma! A Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) fires a beam of (separated) electrons (=cathode rays) at a screen to make it glow...

Proton beams are a tad more exotic (at least I can't think of any everyday examples) but easy to do with an accelerator and a vacuum line e.g. at CERN.
 

Offline daveshorts

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High energy proton beams can be used to treat cancer, they have different penetration properties to alpha or beta raiation. I think they tend to produce the highest dose below the surface - literally cooking fdrom the inside - this is because most of the damage isn't done by the protons themselves but particles they produce by hitting atoms in the body, so the top layers are relatively untouched.
 

Offline lightarrow

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Can we ever completely seperate electric charge? I mean can we actually ever isolate electrons or protons without having their respective opposite charges nearbye aka polarization. or is the strength of charge just to strong to do it significantly.
It depends on how much charge you want to separate. The more it is, the more energy you need. To completely separate electrons from protons in 1 gram of, let's say, iron, would require a Huge amount of energy.
 

Offline chris

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How do you make the proton beam that Dave mention? For electrons a hot filament placed in a strong field accelerates a beam of electrons, but how do you get protons?

Chris
 

another_someone

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Protons are just hydrogen nuclei - strip the electron off a hydrogen atom, and what you are left with is a proton.

There may be other nuclear reactions that also eject protons from a nuclei - not sure if denuding hydrogen is the most efficient way of doing it.
 

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