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Author Topic: Will we ever find dark matter?  (Read 918 times)

Offline thedoc

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Will we ever find dark matter?
« on: 18/01/2016 22:16:11 »
The world you can see around you is just a tiny slice of the Universe, will we ever find the rest of the cake?

Read the article then tell us what you think...
« Last Edit: 18/01/2016 22:16:11 by _system »


 

Offline dhjdhj

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Re: Will we ever find dark matter?
« Reply #1 on: 18/01/2016 15:58:55 »
The answer is of course nobody knows. I am wondering whether dark matter exists in the same form of mass as the rest of observable matter. The strong nuclear force is some 10 to the 40 times as strong as gravity. If dark matter is unformatted matter as opposed to atoms which are stable structures, and yet it still carries the same forces, then the matter required is 10 to 40 times less to create the necessary gravity to balance the universe. Also as unformatted matter it would not have the necessary structure to emit energy in quanta to enable us to detect it.
 

Offline Space Flow

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Re: Will we ever find dark matter?
« Reply #2 on: 18/01/2016 20:06:44 »
There is of course no such thing as Dark Matter.
There exists gravitational effects that we can't explain with our current interpretation of GR. That is the only fact. Everything else connected with the claim of some other type of Matter is pure conjecture, with absolutely no substance.

Why do we insist on looking for a particle solution to everything?
https://vimeo.com/147667252
 

Offline alysdexia

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Re: Will we ever find dark matter?
« Reply #3 on: 21/01/2016 11:47:49 »
Of course we will.  But shall we?

This editorial is the crap.  It's the same reason I hate blogs.  It talks about cake which has nothing to do with the subject, then contradicts itself when it says dark matter interacts with nothing then says it has effects, then it says sound travels when it only applies to life, then repeats another misnomer arm's length when length is time, then confuses fastness with swiftness, and then confuses theories with hýpotheses like the average halfwit.

There is of course no such thing as Dark Matter.
There exists gravitational effects that we can't explain with our current interpretation of GR. That is the only fact. Everything else connected with the claim of some other type of Matter is pure conjecture, with absolutely no substance.
purus := clean -> absolutus := sheer.

Dark matter has shapes and trajectories, unlike MOND.  Galactic collisions make dark matter.

It must exist.  Why?  I know what it is: The Planck scale is the simple threshold where gravity is stronger than Coulombic repulsion; therefore the neutralino is the gravitatal (formerly "gravital", formerly "gravitational") fusion of two neutrinos, where a neutrino (by reverse-engineering of the neutròn decay formula) is the succinal (formerly "elèctric", to distinguish the literal "èlectric", thouh the Hellènic equivalent of -alis may be -ada despite in practise -ico, equivalent to Latin -ice but usually lenite to -i) and sideral (< sudor, which alludes to the nuclear liqvid drop model and to stellar furnaces themselves; formerly "coloral" but I now ditch this ambigvity along with all others; if "succinal" is too ambigvus I can name it "fulgar"; now all three fundamental interactions are in flat Latin.  Or I could refer to their theorists as above as Newtonic, Coulombic, Yucawaic.) fusion of a mesòn and leptòn.  So when you first bond two neutrinos you get a Z0 (the equivalent of the excimer He2), then valent glueballs they mistakenly call Higgs bosòns (the equivalent of exciplices like HeNe), and lastly the neutralino.  The neutrino belongs in its own block of the periodic table of elements above hydrogen (or neutròn) and the neutralino in its block above the neutrino, one element each.  The other generations are merely isomers, like parahydrogen, and shouldn't be called elementary.
« Last Edit: 21/01/2016 12:11:14 by alysdexia »
 

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Re: Will we ever find dark matter?
« Reply #3 on: 21/01/2016 11:47:49 »

 

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