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Author Topic: Is seeing things in the past a part of simultaneity and relativity?  (Read 796 times)

Offline Thebox

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Hello, I am writing an article,  I just need confirm something, Is seeing things in the past a part of simultaneity and relativity?

and was it Einstein who thought of this?

I only need a yes or no answer please, no discussion.


 

Offline alancalverd

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Everything we see is in the past because the speed of light is finite.
 

Offline Thebox

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Everything we see is in the past because the speed of light is finite.

That does not answer my questions. I just wanted a yes or no, I know the speed of light is finite. 

''Part Four - Defining Measurement.

To continue in the aim of understanding, let us define what a measurement is and be certain that we understand.  A measurement is the distance between two geometrical points.  A base quantity such as a length of a distance or such  as an increment length of time or the mass of something.   Measurement is a scalar quantity when spoken in these terms, often based on linearities between two points and the result of measurement being a finite result contained between two points. Measurement generally uses a first point with a zero value and the second point being the result of the measurement.   This scalar type measurement differs slightly to the measuring system of vector measurement.  Vector measurement concerns with velocities added and several geometrical points  and uses Minkowski's space-time, a four dimension manifold of three dimensions of X,Y,Z and a forth dimension of time, also used in Albert Einstein's special relativity and the common use of present.''

''Part Five Defining Constant.

It is worldly accepted that the speed of light is constant to all observers in any reference frame when measured in a vacuum.  When talking Physics, the word constant refers to the speed of light and means that the speed of light is unchanging and can be measured to being the same speed by any observer. However, the speed of light is not infinite but is widely agreed to be finite.  To be clear on our understanding, the constant of light is only constant and unchanged in a vacuum, where as none vacuums with mediums and objects have effect and makes the speed a variate and changing wavelength.  However it is of importance that we understand the word constant has other meanings.

Let us consider colour, relative to us we observe colour , colours are a wave-length of light, a certain frequency that defines the colour we observe. In observation we observe a red apple, the colour of red is constant to all visual observers who are not colour blind. The red is unchanging and remains a constant until it decays and loses its colour.

Let us now consider gravity, relative to us it is constantly pulling us to the ground.

So in our understanding constant is more than just a constant speed, it is any observation occurring continuously over a period of time.''
« Last Edit: 22/01/2016 19:42:05 by Thebox »
 

Offline Space Flow

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Is seeing things in the past a part of simultaneity and relativity?
No it is part of reality. The finite speed of light makes it so. Simultaneity and relativity, can and do work with this fact, but are not the cause of it.

and was it Einstein who thought of this?
No it was not. The finite and constant speed of light can better be attributed to Maxwell and his equations. Einstein interpreted what the outcome of maxwell's equations had to say about simultaneity, and relativity.
I only need a yes or no answer please, no discussion.
A yes or a No answer is not appropriate because of the way you phrased the question.
 

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