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Author Topic: Is ''light'' anti-matter  (Read 1191 times)

Offline Thebox

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Is ''light'' anti-matter
« on: 31/01/2016 08:59:34 »
>E = > 4/3 pi r = >V= <D  where V is volume and D is density


I think to understand this we need to look at this in the context of ''positive'' and ''negative'' and a relationship to Quarks.
 
 
By positive and negative, I am not considering a standard positive negative although I do apply some principle use of standard positive and negative polarities.
 
Consider that we know that positive is repulsive to positive and also know that positive is attracted to negative,
 
This relatively shows us that negative must be attracted to negative,
 
So let us consider why negative is attractive to negative!
 
Let us take a mass and call it m1, let us say for the thought of the experiment that m1 has an entropy equilibrium of positive and negative.
 
q(m1)=.5 neg
q(m1)=.5 pos
 
where q is ''charge/polarity''
 
Now let us consider that .5 of m1 wants to expand because + repels + , so all the + wants to expand from itself,
 
however .5 of  m1 wants to contract, neg pulls neg back together,
 

Now consider all plus is anti-matter and all neg is matter. I believe this answers loads of stuff.


 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #1 on: 31/01/2016 09:05:01 »
Quote
Is ''light'' anti-matter?

no

Quote
>E = > 4/3 pi r = >V= <D  where V is volume and D is density

drivel. Please study dimensional analysis and check that your ex nihilo equations at least meet the criterion of dimensional balance.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #2 on: 31/01/2016 09:08:05 »
Quote
Is ''light'' anti-matter?

no

Quote
>E = > 4/3 pi r = >V= <D  where V is volume and D is density

drivel. Please study dimensional analysis and check that your ex nihilo equations at least meet the criterion of dimensional balance.

You say no, instantly, without consideration for the facts.


The equation works a blind man could read it ,

greater energy is equal to greater spherical size which is equal to greater volume which is equal to lesser density.

Consider metal expansion and gas expansion. Evidence 1 and 2




« Last Edit: 31/01/2016 09:12:44 by Thebox »
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #3 on: 01/02/2016 06:57:59 »
Let me add a ''godly'' explanation

The Battle of good and evil

The fires of hell burn deep inside the good, the fires of hell wanting to tear the good apart and expand it's evil, only the negative of good keeps the good together, we stay strong if we unite our negativeness. 

Tearing apart the good creates nothing but evil, the evil energy expanding destroying more good.


I just hope your syntactic ambiguity is up to scratch.



« Last Edit: 01/02/2016 07:05:35 by Thebox »
 

Offline Colin2B

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #4 on: 01/02/2016 08:43:57 »
I just hope your syntactic ambiguity is up to scratch.
Your's certainly is :-)
 

Offline puppypower

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #5 on: 01/02/2016 13:02:18 »
One observation, that might offer insight, that is overlooked and even reasoned away, is the preponderance of the universal data has the positive charge of the universe attached to the proton, while negative charge of the universe is attached to the electron. Although the opposite situation is possible and is called anti-matter; positron and anti-proton, the vast preponderance of the observed universal data is proton and electron.

Does the preponderance of data, rule the day, and mean that positive charge has slightly more affinity for the heavier mass; proton, while negative charge have slightly more affinity for the lighter mass; electron? The opposite is possible but defines higher potential at the level of what binds charge to mass.

In all of chemistry, when the reactants (analogy of matter and anti-matter) have several paths leading to different products, the dominate product always have more stability, even if all other combinations of products appear in smaller amounts. Are we given too much weight to lab data and not enough weight to the preponderance of natural data?

As an analogy, proteins can be synthesized in the lab and will appear as equal amounts of left and right helixes. In life, where protein concentrations of the earth are dominant, we only see left handed helixes. The protein will appear as equal and opposite in the lab; optical isomers, but a distinction forms in natural systems. Only left handed helixes are chosen because only there are chemically active; base stability to go further.

Would it be valid to ignore the preponderance of the natural data and assume the lab data is the final standard in terms of proteins? Why do we do this with charge?
« Last Edit: 01/02/2016 13:04:19 by puppypower »
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #6 on: 01/02/2016 21:41:29 »
One observation, that might offer insight, that is overlooked and even reasoned away, is the preponderance of the universal data has the positive charge of the universe attached to the proton, while negative charge of the universe is attached to the electron. Although the opposite situation is possible and is called anti-matter; positron and anti-proton, the vast preponderance of the observed universal data is proton and electron.

Does the preponderance of data, rule the day, and mean that positive charge has slightly more affinity for the heavier mass; proton, while negative charge have slightly more affinity for the lighter mass; electron? The opposite is possible but defines higher potential at the level of what binds charge to mass.

In all of chemistry, when the reactants (analogy of matter and anti-matter) have several paths leading to different products, the dominate product always have more stability, even if all other combinations of products appear in smaller amounts. Are we given too much weight to lab data and not enough weight to the preponderance of natural data?

As an analogy, proteins can be synthesized in the lab and will appear as equal amounts of left and right helixes. In life, where protein concentrations of the earth are dominant, we only see left handed helixes. The protein will appear as equal and opposite in the lab; optical isomers, but a distinction forms in natural systems. Only left handed helixes are chosen because only there are chemically active; base stability to go further.

Would it be valid to ignore the preponderance of the natural data and assume the lab data is the final standard in terms of proteins? Why do we do this with charge?

I am not quite sure what you are asking, I drew a diagram



 

Offline Alohascope

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #7 on: 02/02/2016 00:22:58 »
Anti-matter should have anti-mass, perhaps.  If so, light cannot be anti-matter because photons can have mass.  In fact .. photonic molecules have been created.  http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/167439-mit-and-harvard-create-new-lightsaber-like-state-of-matter-photonic-molecules
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #8 on: 02/02/2016 00:28:26 »
Anti-matter should have anti-mass, perhaps.  If so, light cannot be anti-matter because photons can have mass.  In fact .. photonic molecules have been created.  http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/167439-mit-and-harvard-create-new-lightsaber-like-state-of-matter-photonic-molecules

An impossibility regardless what they say or think, positive and positive can not bond together they can only expand.
 

Offline Alohascope

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #9 on: 02/02/2016 00:46:48 »
Anti-matter should have anti-mass, perhaps.  If so, light cannot be anti-matter because photons can have mass.  In fact .. photonic molecules have been created.  http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/167439-mit-and-harvard-create-new-lightsaber-like-state-of-matter-photonic-molecules

An impossibility regardless what they say or think, positive and positive can not bond together they can only expand.

Regardless of what you think you should at least read what they have to say.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #10 on: 02/02/2016 07:41:06 »
Anti-matter should have anti-mass, perhaps.  If so, light cannot be anti-matter because photons can have mass.  In fact .. photonic molecules have been created.  http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/167439-mit-and-harvard-create-new-lightsaber-like-state-of-matter-photonic-molecules

An impossibility regardless what they say or think, positive and positive can not bond together they can only expand.

Regardless of what you think you should at least read what they have to say.

I read enough .

''These photonic molecules have been theorized to exist''   this does not mean they exist.
 

Offline Alohascope

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #11 on: 05/02/2016 22:24:01 »
Anti-matter should have anti-mass, perhaps.  If so, light cannot be anti-matter because photons can have mass.  In fact .. photonic molecules have been created.  http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/167439-mit-and-harvard-create-new-lightsaber-like-state-of-matter-photonic-molecules

An impossibility regardless what they say or think, positive and positive can not bond together they can only expand.

Regardless of what you think you should at least read what they have to say.

I read enough .

''These photonic molecules have been theorized to exist''   this does not mean they exist.

The url says they DO exist .. created in a lab so probably also have a natural existence.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #12 on: 06/02/2016 12:46:55 »
Anti-matter should have anti-mass, perhaps.  If so, light cannot be anti-matter because photons can have mass.  In fact .. photonic molecules have been created.  http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/167439-mit-and-harvard-create-new-lightsaber-like-state-of-matter-photonic-molecules

An impossibility regardless what they say or think, positive and positive can not bond together they can only expand.

Regardless of what you think you should at least read what they have to say.

I read enough .

''These photonic molecules have been theorized to exist''   this does not mean they exist.

The url says they DO exist .. created in a lab so probably also have a natural existence.

Observer effect all the way

''Now, however, the Harvard and MIT researchers, led by Lukin, have managed to make photons behave almost as if theyre normal, massive particles. To do this, the researchers pump rubidium atoms into a vacuum chamber, and then cool the vacuum down until its a few degrees from absolute zero. Extremely weak laser light a stream of single photons is then shone through the rubidium-filled vacuum. As individual photons travel through the medium, it loses energy to the rubidium atoms, slowing down. When the researchers used the laser to fire two photons, instead of one, they found that the photons became a two-photon molecule by the time it left the medium.''

The Photons became entangled, they are massless, they have no problem passing through each other, they have no problem being several photons in the same reference point simultaneously.

Light is massless with a certainty. it passes through things in certain spectrum ranges. 
 

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Re: Is ''light'' anti-matter
« Reply #12 on: 06/02/2016 12:46:55 »

 

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