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Author Topic: Does pi stand for "perfectly incomplete" ?  (Read 1399 times)

Offline the5thforce

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Does pi stand for "perfectly incomplete" ?
« on: 08/02/2016 10:52:04 »
pi=perfectly incomplete

even a perfect circle has no symmetry:  3.14159265359... ∞

the uncertainty principle in physics and godel’s incompleteness theorem in math is a reflection of pi itself, an imperfect circle is asymmetrical and a perfect circle is undefined thus all ‘real’ circles are asymmetrical and all lines are sections of an imperfect circle. pi is infinitely uncertain/incomplete, the purely abstract concept of a perfect circle is itself the singularity which creates the real imperfect multiverse- infinitely expanding pi.

pi is infinitely complex and infinitely paradoxical, the only thing both stable and unstable enough to generate consciousness, pi is the only perfectly unstable-symmetry(perfectly stable by being perfectly incomplete), pi is the only incomplete fractal, the only fertile contradiction.

each new digit of pi is simultaneously a new symmetry and a new symmetry break defining a completely new imperfect circle out of the image of the perfect singularity

pi=O, pi=(singularity), pi=perfectly-incomplete(duality), pi=singularity-duality(trinity), pi=3.14159265359..., pi=∞
« Last Edit: 08/02/2016 11:22:26 by chris »


 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Does pi stand for "perfectly incomplete" ?
« Reply #1 on: 08/02/2016 11:29:29 »
3.14159265359


Pi stands for  3.14159265359  and of course it is not symmetrical or complete until used in the equation with radius added. Pi is a constant ratio, Pi is not a circle in a stand alone position.



« Last Edit: 08/02/2016 11:35:06 by Thebox »
 
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Offline Colin2B

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Re: Does pi stand for "perfectly incomplete" ?
« Reply #2 on: 08/02/2016 16:36:25 »
Pi stands for  3.14159265359  and of course it is not symmetrical or complete until used in the equation with radius added. Pi is a constant ratio, Pi is not a circle in a stand alone position.
Good point Mr Box

the uncertainty principle in physics .......... is a reflection of pi itself,
No, it relates to complementary variables not4f08e3dba63dc6d40b22952c7a9dac6d.gif
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Does pi stand for "perfectly incomplete" ?
« Reply #3 on: 08/02/2016 20:43:25 »
Quote from: the5thforce
pi=perfectly incomplete
pi is the Greek letter "π", equivalent to our English "p".
This symbol is used to represent the ratio of diameter to circumference of a circle, but also turns up in many places in mathematics.

Quote
a perfect circle has no symmetry
I disagree; a perfect circle is perfectly symmetrical.

Quote
pi is infinitely uncertain
I suggest that every digit of pi is completely predictable.

That does not imply that we know everything about pi; for example, it is not clear if every possible finite number appears somewhere in the decimal expansion of pi.

Quote
pi is infinitely complex and infinitely paradoxical...
Many of the same things could be said of any irrational number - and there are infinitely many of them to play with.
Try √2=1.414213562373...
Try e= 2.7182818284590....
Try φ=1.6180339887.....

In fact, there are more irrational numbers to play with than there are digits in pi to play with....
That's why mathematicians enjoy their work so much!
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Does pi stand for "perfectly incomplete" ?
« Reply #4 on: 08/02/2016 22:26:59 »
pi is infinitely complex and infinitely paradoxical
It is neither complex (it is entirely a real number) nor paradoxical. It just happens to be irrational, i.e. cannot be expressed as the ratio of two integers. So what?   
 

Offline Bill S

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Re: Does pi stand for "perfectly incomplete" ?
« Reply #5 on: 09/02/2016 12:08:50 »
Quote from: evan
That's why mathematicians enjoy their work so much!

Quote from: Alan
  So what?

So – perhaps it’s a matter of enjoying playing with figures.  Mathematicians may endlessly discuss things like 0^0=0 or 0^0=1, which to the rest of the world seem inconsequential.  Why, then, should, the5thforce not enjoy playing with Pi?  We should just remember that this is imaginative philosophy, not maths or science. 

Go for it “Force”, but don’t expect too much enthusiasm on a science forum. :)
 

Offline Colin2B

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Re: Does pi stand for "perfectly incomplete" ?
« Reply #6 on: 09/02/2016 12:24:11 »
...  We should just remember that this is imaginative philosophy, not maths or science. 

Go for it “Force”, but don’t expect too much enthusiasm on a science forum. :)
As you say, this is a science forum not a philosophy forum.
However, the least he could do would be to base his ideas on solid principles, eg pi has nothing to do with uncertainty principle, that assumption isn't even good philosophy!
 

Offline lightarrow

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Re: Does pi stand for "perfectly incomplete" ?
« Reply #7 on: 09/02/2016 18:33:56 »
pi=perfectly incomplete
even a perfect circle has no symmetry:  3.14159265359... ∞
the uncertainty principle in physics and godel’s incompleteness theorem in math is a reflection of pi itself,
...
Just a question: did you take phrases at chance and pasted them together?

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lightarrow
 

Offline lightarrow

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Re: Does pi stand for "perfectly incomplete" ?
« Reply #8 on: 09/02/2016 18:56:47 »
About the number π: it's *a number* (a real number, more precisely irrational) as it is sqrt(2), for example, and so it has no need to be defined in terms of geometry (about the ratio of diameter to circumference of a circle: it's the number π only in euclidean geometry; in other geometries that ratio is other numbers) and has with physics the same relation that has any other number, excepting the fact it's more used than others.

π could be defined as other real numbers (like the number "e") are defined, with an infinite series, e.g.:

π = sqrt(12)∑{k=0, k=∞} (-3)-k/(2k+1)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Approximations_of_%CF%80

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lightarrow
« Last Edit: 09/02/2016 19:03:20 by lightarrow »
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Does pi stand for "perfectly incomplete" ?
« Reply #9 on: 09/02/2016 22:55:06 »
π is much more important than its feature in euclidean geometry. It turns up in spherical geometry, whcih is the basis for terrestrial navigation, and the equation e = -1 is fundamental to a whole swathe of calculus including the reconstruction of 3D images from magnetic resonance signals, and bandwidth compression algorithms.

You can indeed calculate π from an infininte series but, as with the one quoted by lightarrow, since the series is multiplied by a constant, that doesn't define π, which is a fundamental constant. The series derives from the properties of π, not the other way round. unlike e, which is indeed defined by a series and derives its properties from that series.
 
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Re: Does pi stand for "perfectly incomplete" ?
« Reply #9 on: 09/02/2016 22:55:06 »

 

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