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Author Topic: Why is the night sky black?  (Read 182 times)

Offline jerrygg38

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Why is the night sky black?
« on: 27/04/2016 15:21:51 »
   In the daytime the question people may ask is "Why is the sky blue?"
This has been answered pretty good. but why is the night sky black?  Why isn't it white? There are so many stars emitting photons that the entire sky should appear white. Yet it is black. Evidently the billions and billions of stars and galaxies do not produce enough visible photons to make the sky white. Why? What is a photon?
   As I see it, the stars emit spherical light waves. there are not photons. Photons occur when a spherical light wave interacts with matter. Spherical light waves are invisible. You cannot see them. All that you can see is when a little piece of the spherical light wave interacts with matter. Thus the light from all the stars is quite invisible. We only see a little piece of the light and thus the sky is black. Any other solutions?


 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: Why is the night sky black?
« Reply #1 on: 27/04/2016 18:25:24 »
OK so build a sphere with a single aperture. Coat the interior with a reflective surface. Embed in that surface light detectors at regular interval. Wire the detectors up to a device fitted into the aperture. The device can then emit a single photon into the sphere. If light is a spherical wave then multiple detections will arise from the single photon. I await the results with anticipation.
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Why is the night sky black?
« Reply #2 on: 27/04/2016 18:38:38 »
As I see it, the stars emit spherical light waves.
And there you are wrong, as evidenced by the fact that the sky is black.

Always a good idea to test your hypothesis against an observation.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Why is the night sky black?
« Reply #3 on: 27/04/2016 19:49:54 »
As I see it, the stars emit spherical light waves.
And there you are wrong, as evidenced by the fact that the sky is black.

Always a good idea to test your hypothesis against an observation.


Hmmm, incorrect , the sky is not black, the night sky is clear, the light that reaches you from the distant stars is too weak to make it light,  A snake see's light in the night time darkness by the ambient light from the distant stars or moon light.

Always a good idea to test your hypothesis against an observation.....



 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Why is the night sky black?
« Reply #4 on: 27/04/2016 19:51:35 »
   In the daytime the question people may ask is "Why is the sky blue?"
This has been answered pretty good. but why is the night sky black?  Why isn't it white? There are so many stars emitting photons that the entire sky should appear white. Yet it is black. Evidently the billions and billions of stars and galaxies do not produce enough visible photons to make the sky white. Why? What is a photon?
   As I see it, the stars emit spherical light waves. there are not photons. Photons occur when a spherical light wave interacts with matter. Spherical light waves are invisible. You cannot see them. All that you can see is when a little piece of the spherical light wave interacts with matter. Thus the light from all the stars is quite invisible. We only see a little piece of the light and thus the sky is black. Any other solutions?

Its not black or white , it is clear.  see through, clarity. colourless
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Why is the night sky black?
« Reply #5 on: 27/04/2016 19:53:46 »
OK so build a sphere with a single aperture. Coat the interior with a reflective surface. Embed in that surface light detectors at regular interval. Wire the detectors up to a device fitted into the aperture. The device can then emit a single photon into the sphere. If light is a spherical wave then multiple detections will arise from the single photon. I await the results with anticipation.

Observer effect if you are using a device to release a single photon, ''photons'' are released isotropically , ''photons'' passing through space are a quanta whole to sight in the very fact space is see through.

 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: Why is the night sky black?
« Reply #6 on: 28/04/2016 13:31:50 »
OK so build a sphere with a single aperture. Coat the interior with a reflective surface. Embed in that surface light detectors at regular interval. Wire the detectors up to a device fitted into the aperture. The device can then emit a single photon into the sphere. If light is a spherical wave then multiple detections will arise from the single photon. I await the results with anticipation.
   That would not work. I guess I did not make myself clear. The single photon is a linear/angular momentum form of photonic energy. It is a perturbation within the gravitational field.  The sun constantly emits linear photons from their atoms. As the photons leave the surface of the sun, they combine into a spherical wave which continually enlarges. Whenever this wave comes upon atoms part of the wave is converted into linear/orbital photons. Most of the wave remains a spherical form of energy which is invisible.
  So any experiment you have using things made of atoms operates as ordinary photons. In between the sun and Earth there are continuous changes to the spherical wave as photons are produced and these turn back into the wave.
  Thanks for pointing out my imperfect presentation. Hopefully this will help.
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: Why is the night sky black?
« Reply #7 on: 28/04/2016 13:34:57 »
As I see it, the stars emit spherical light waves.
And there you are wrong, as evidenced by the fact that the sky is black.

Always a good idea to test your hypothesis against an observation.

  It seems to me if the light was in the form of photons there would be so many of them that the night sky would be while everywhere. The astronauts do not see that and therefore in my opinion, the light everywhere is invisible except where it reacts with matter. think about it.
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: Why is the night sky black?
« Reply #8 on: 28/04/2016 13:43:36 »
As I see it, the stars emit spherical light waves.
And there you are wrong, as evidenced by the fact that the sky is black.

Always a good idea to test your hypothesis against an observation.


Hmmm, incorrect , the sky is not black, the night sky is clear, the light that reaches you from the distant stars is too weak to make it light,  A snake see's light in the night time darkness by the ambient light from the distant stars or moon light.

Always a good idea to test your hypothesis against an observation.....





   If the density of particles in the vacuum of space was high, the sky everywhere would be white. You are correct when you say the sky is clear. the point I am trying to make is that the spherical light waves only produce photons when they react with atoms, electron, and protons, etc. The clear far sky with nothing within it does not produce photons. Spherical momentum waves when they interact with matter produce linear/angular momentum photons. Yes the far stars are quite weak and the spherical wave that they emit is as large as their distance from us. Thus we only see a very little piece of the far star. If the vacuum has many particles within it, even our sun would light up the night sky. So the problem is the spherical nature of the light wave and the density of particles of space beyond our atmosphere. Thanks for your input.
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: Why is the night sky black?
« Reply #9 on: 28/04/2016 13:45:42 »
   In the daytime the question people may ask is "Why is the sky blue?"
This has been answered pretty good. but why is the night sky black?  Why isn't it white? There are so many stars emitting photons that the entire sky should appear white. Yet it is black. Evidently the billions and billions of stars and galaxies do not produce enough visible photons to make the sky white. Why? What is a photon?
   As I see it, the stars emit spherical light waves. there are not photons. Photons occur when a spherical light wave interacts with matter. Spherical light waves are invisible. You cannot see them. All that you can see is when a little piece of the spherical light wave interacts with matter. Thus the light from all the stars is quite invisible. We only see a little piece of the light and thus the sky is black. Any other solutions?

Its not black or white , it is clear.  see through, clarity. colourless

   Yes. That is true. I hope in my other replies I have made my points better.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Why is the night sky black?
« Reply #10 on: 28/04/2016 18:15:06 »
As I see it, the stars emit spherical light waves.
And there you are wrong, as evidenced by the fact that the sky is black.

Always a good idea to test your hypothesis against an observation.


Hmmm, incorrect , the sky is not black, the night sky is clear, the light that reaches you from the distant stars is too weak to make it light,  A snake see's light in the night time darkness by the ambient light from the distant stars or moon light.

Always a good idea to test your hypothesis against an observation.....





   If the density of particles in the vacuum of space was high, the sky everywhere would be white. You are correct when you say the sky is clear. the point I am trying to make is that the spherical light waves only produce photons when they react with atoms, electron, and protons, etc. The clear far sky with nothing within it does not produce photons. Spherical momentum waves when they interact with matter produce linear/angular momentum photons. Yes the far stars are quite weak and the spherical wave that they emit is as large as their distance from us. Thus we only see a very little piece of the far star. If the vacuum has many particles within it, even our sun would light up the night sky. So the problem is the spherical nature of the light wave and the density of particles of space beyond our atmosphere. Thanks for your input.

It sounds to me like you are trying to explain this


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoelectric_effect
 

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Re: Why is the night sky black?
« Reply #10 on: 28/04/2016 18:15:06 »

 

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