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Author Topic: Can we use atmospheric lenses as telescopes?  (Read 105 times)

Expectant_Philosopher

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Can we use atmospheric lenses as telescopes?
« on: 10/10/2014 17:28:10 »
In this article, ieeexplore.ieee.org/iel1/3/8574/00375943.pdf?arnumber=375943,

 from NP Barnes - ‎1995

"Abstract-Atmospheric absorption degrades laser performance both by absorbing .... atmosphere, and the subsequent thermally induced lensing"

They discuss atmospheric lens formation by laser as a problem to be overcome, but I see an opportunity.  If we can amplify the effect it seems to me we could build an extremely large lens, perhaps even several large lenses stacked in sequence to amplify light from stars.  It seems we could use the ability to create an atmospheric lens to build an amplifying telescope out of thin air.
« Last Edit: 10/10/2014 17:37:24 by Expectant_Philosopher »

Expectant_Philosopher

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Re: Can we use atmospheric lenses as telescopes?
« Reply #1 on: 10/10/2014 20:14:06 »
Here is the full abstract.

Atmospheric absorption degrades laser performance both by absorbing laser energy within the laser resonator, which increases the loss, and by inducing a thermal lens in the atmosphere. Atmospheric thermal lensing can be quite severe, even when the absorption coefficient is quite modest. A model is developed which describes atmospheric thermal lensing; time constants, which are associated with the establishment and decay of the atmospheric thermal lens, are determined; experiments are performed using an injection seeded Ti:Al 2O3 laser tuned to the H2O absorption lines near 0.815 μm to validate the model; dependence of the atmospheric thermal lens on the laser energy and absorption coefficient were measured and found to agree with the model. In addition, the decay of the atmospheric thermal lens with time was measured and also found to agree with the model predictions



Expectant_Philosopher

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Re: Can we use atmospheric lenses as telescopes?
« Reply #2 on: 11/10/2014 07:12:27 »
Another article supporting an ability to change the refractive index of atmosphere by laser.

Appl Opt. 1971 Aug 1;10(8):1877-84. doi: 10.1364/AO.10.001877.
Effects of 10.6-mu Laser Induced Air Chemistry on the Atmospheric Refractive Index.
Wood AD, Camac M, Gerry ET.
Abstract
Atmospheric absorption of 10.6-mu radiation can either heat or cool the air, depending upon atmospheric conditions. Absorption by CO(2) is essentially from the (100) to the (001) states. The depleted (100) state is rapidly replenished by energy transfer from translation, cooling the atmosphere. The (001) state slowly transfers energy through the N(2) back to translation, eventually heating the atmosphere. Cooling increases the density and index of refraction, and the resulting gradient tends to focus a gaussian beam. This partially offsets the usual heating effects and associated ray divergence.

Expectant_Philosopher

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Re: Can we use atmospheric lenses as telescopes?
« Reply #3 on: 30/10/2014 05:39:23 »
I thought about the reverse process instead of a magnifying lens to act as an atmospheric telescope it might be used as a James Bond like weapon ala Gustav Graves.  This would actually put it in the realm of a biblical weapon.  As an amplifier and focus mechanism for sunlight you could manipulate the beam of energy to appear as a pillar of fire.  Alternatively you could manipulate convection currents to create a pillar of wind.  Use the latter two processes and you could part the Red Sea. Use the beam energy with an oscillator and you could thump the ground into an artificial earthquake to pull down buildings. It could explain the destruction of Sodom and Gommorah, Jericho, and the forces displayed during the Exodus.  This type of effect is easily defeated if you knew the cause, but would be in awe of it if you did not.

 

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