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Author Topic: Could light be the only truly stationary "stuff" in the universe?  (Read 690 times)

Offline Matthew Malley

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Could it be possible that the universe is expanding at 186,000 miles per second, making for light's "speed limit" and light being the only truly stationary stuff in our universe? What if it's not light that's doing the moving; it's us (and the universe) that's expanding away from it? Matt Malley, Thousand Oaks, CA
« Last Edit: 14/02/2016 03:00:02 by Matthew Malley »


 

Offline Spring Theory

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The universe expansion is not constant - it is accelerating.  So according to your question, light could not be stationary.
 
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Offline Matthew Malley

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True Spring Theory but what if, in the distant future, we discover that the speed of light increases in conjunction with the increase of speed in the expansion of the universe?
 

Offline chiralSPO

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We know that can't be. If light were accelerating at the same rate that the universe was expanding, the redshift would not be observed.

There is another problem with assuming that light is stationary: we can see stars from multiple directions (all around us!) If light were stationary, and we were moving such that we only happened to see the light we passed through, then we would only see light from one direction (exactly opposite the direction we were moving).
 
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Offline Matthew Malley

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I see your point Chiral but remember; the universe isn't a "giant 3 dimensional room", as Einstein discovered. It exists in ways that the senses and instinct don't easily comprehend. What if the redshifting is due to us doing the moving instead of light? My theory isn't postulating that light is accelerating with the expanding universe - I'm theorizing that light is genuinely stationary and the universe is expanding and accelerating away from it, giving us the illusion that it's light that is doing the moving when in my theorized reality, it's us who are doing the moving instead.
« Last Edit: 14/02/2016 21:08:01 by Matthew Malley »
 

Offline chiralSPO

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I see your point Chiral but remember; the universe isn't a "giant 3 dimensional room", as Einstein discovered. It exists in ways that the senses and instinct don't easily comprehend. What if the redshifting is due to us doing the moving instead of light? My theory isn't postulating that light is accelerating with the expanding universe - I'm theorizing that light is genuinely stationary and the universe is expanding and accelerating away from it, giving us the illusion that it's light that is doing the moving when in my theorized reality, it's us who are doing the moving instead.

If the light is stationary, and we are moving, why is the light from different objects redshifted by different amounts?

I'm also still not certain how we could perceive light from different directions if it is stationary and we are moving... Are we moving in one direction? Are we moving outward in all directions? If the latter, please explain what is meant by "moving"? If the former, how could we perceive light from any direction other than the one we are moving toward?

Also, since you mention Einstein, whose frame of reference are we talking about? If I understand correctly (big if), from the hypothetical perspective of a photon traveling at the speed of light, the photon must be stationary with respect to itself, and due to Lorentz length and time contractions associated with a velocity of c, the photon is stationary to the rest of the universe (along the trajectory that it is traveling) and completes a journey of 0 distance in 0 time. Doesn't make any intuitive sense, but as far as I understand, nothing does when traveling at c!
 
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Offline Matthew Malley

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Good points Chiral!
1) "...why is the light from different objects redshifted by different amounts?" Maybe, (since this is a theory after all), the universe, in different locations, is expanding at different speeds.
2) "...I'm also still not certain how we could perceive light from different directions if it is stationary and we are moving... Are we moving in one direction? Are we moving outward in all directions? If the latter, please explain what is meant by "moving"? If the former, how could we perceive light from any direction other than the one we are moving toward?" - I propose that we are moving, relative to the entire universe, in all directions and it is gravity that is distorting our perception of light in it's stationary state, which can explain how we can see light from all directions, in various states of redshift.
3) "Also, since you mention Einstein, whose frame of reference are we talking about? If I understand correctly (big if), from the hypothetical perspective of a photon traveling at the speed of light, the photon must be stationary with respect to itself, and due to Lorentz length and time contractions associated with a velocity of c, the photon is stationary to the rest of the universe (along the trajectory that it is traveling) and completes a journey of 0 distance in 0 time. Doesn't make any intuitive sense, but as far as I understand, nothing does when traveling at c!" - This is where I believe Light to be truly stationary! Light travels 0 distance in 0 time. This is just a feeling at this point, but I feel strongly about this theory of mine that light is stationary.
 

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