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Author Topic: Are modern humans having sex incorrectly?  (Read 1587 times)

Offline the5thforce

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Are modern humans having sex incorrectly?
« on: 18/02/2016 09:19:30 »
what if early humans/cavemen learned to have sex without thrusting? assuming they had lots of free time to explore eachothers bodies without words before language was invented, perhaps they simply inserted the penis into the vagina and then manually stimulated the clitoris which slowly triggers her pelvic floor muscles on his stationary penis, pelvic floor muscles would oscillate pressure/squeezing the stationary inserted penis until thrusting is almost required in order to prevent slipping out, perhaps the entire thrusting mechanics of sex was primarily an animal technique and early humans adopted a different method but somehow forgot and so reverted to mimicking animals again..
 
if thrusting particularly at the beginning of sex typically hurts human females(many describe a puncture sensation until fully aroused), i have to assume it wouldnt have been a very fertile technique for early humans- especially considering females were much more robust(neanderthal females for example- you wouldnt want to upset one), also keep in mind thrusting is unnecessary for triggering male orgasm- oscillating pressure is vastly more important(combining pressure with thrusting only speeds up the process)

instead of early humans training the vagina to stay loose for thrusting, the female might instead have contracted her pelvic floor muscles until thrusting was necessary, perhaps learning to oscillate pressure to the cadence of clitoral stimulation, you might even venture to say this process couldve played a vital role in the development of early language- humans training themselves to associate vocal sounds with sexual contractions indicating good or bad which is ultimately the basis of language. if what i just proposed at all played a factor in human evolution it would be highly ironic that we lost these techniques in translation over the 200,000+ years humans have been around..
« Last Edit: 18/02/2016 09:29:08 by the5thforce »


 

Offline the5thforce

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Re: Are modern humans having sex incorrectly?
« Reply #1 on: 18/02/2016 09:47:56 »
ultimately theres room for many potentially 'fertile' techniques- be it violent coercion, mutual desire to please, or mutual desire to procreate- likely a mix of all three have been around for a very long time. i was only trying to imagine how it wouldve played out before language was invented and before human females lost so much of their muscle mass which i believe didnt happen until relatively recently on an evolutionary scale. i imagine if sex was too undesireable for the female and obviously raising children is incredibly taxing on resources we likely would not have survived as long as we have


in response to a few points on the recent podcast "Rules of Attraction: The Science of Sex"
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/typo3conf/ext/naksci_podcast/jplayer/player.php?podcast=1001299

structural beauty:

genders evolved because of radioactively decaying DNA, genders survive because of the genetic recycling a dual-gender system provides which counters DNA decay while protecting desireable traits

male muscular-skeletal robusticity protects the dna which then serves to renew the structural dna of female offspring, the female protects and improves the appearance of the male dna through sexual selection

an asexual/hermaphroditic genetic-cloning system is unsustainable long term as the genome eventually succumbs to radioactively induced infertility/disease, which is why so few genetically-complex organisms survive in such systems

in most species a healthy female is designed to seek the most robust male to ensure offspring inherit dna that is structurally viable, and the male is designed to seek the most aesthetic/youthful/proportional female to ensure their offspring are sexually viable
« Last Edit: 18/02/2016 10:26:57 by the5thforce »
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Are modern humans having sex incorrectly?
« Reply #2 on: 18/02/2016 10:19:14 »
Quote from: the5thforce
what if early humans/cavemen learned to have sex without thrusting?
The evolutionary biologists among us suggest that thrusting is effective at flushing out any semen from previous matings (this is not just restricted to humans).
They suggest that it is a hard-wired instinct for a male to improve his odds of fathering a child.
The thrusting instinct stops at ejaculation.
 

Offline the5thforce

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Re: Are modern humans having sex incorrectly?
« Reply #3 on: 18/02/2016 10:34:53 »
Quote from: the5thforce
what if early humans/cavemen learned to have sex without thrusting?
The evolutionary biologists among us suggest that thrusting is effective at flushing out any semen from previous matings (this is not just restricted to humans).
They suggest that it is a hard-wired instinct for a male to improve his odds of fathering a child.
The thrusting instinct stops at ejaculation.

thats possible, but considering that it takes more than 2 children per woman to sustain the population, eventually you'd be fathering multiple viable children with the woman youre mating with regardless of which ones are actually yours, also my original point was that humans for whatever reasons required so much more intelligence to survive- i believe our sexuality(and the need to get creative to persuade women to have more than 2 children without using language) couldve played a significant role
« Last Edit: 18/02/2016 11:05:43 by the5thforce »
 

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Re: Are modern humans having sex incorrectly?
« Reply #3 on: 18/02/2016 10:34:53 »

 

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