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Author Topic: Is a photon positive, negative or neutral?  (Read 2656 times)

Offline JoeBrown

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Is a photon positive, negative or neutral?
« on: 23/03/2016 05:32:45 »
Or something else?


 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Is a photon positive, negative or neutral?
« Reply #1 on: 23/03/2016 08:51:17 »
A photon is neutral.

A photon can be produced by acceleration of an electron (eg visible light) or a proton (eg gamma rays), but these charged particles retain their electric charge, and the neutral photon carries away some energy released in the event. 

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photon
 

Offline acsinuk

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Re: Is a photon positive, negative or neutral?
« Reply #2 on: 26/03/2016 17:39:57 »
A photon is neutral and is a magnetic vibration when in free space. If it interacts with matter; then that electromagnetic magnoflux energy can be captured by a molecule which has an electron enclosure which makes it appears to be a negative charge vibration
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is a photon positive, negative or neutral?
« Reply #3 on: 29/03/2016 14:17:11 »
A photon is neutral.

A photon can be produced by acceleration of an electron (eg visible light) or a proton (eg gamma rays), but these charged particles retain their electric charge, and the neutral photon carries away some energy released in the event. 

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photon

I thought a Photon was polymorphic so although it is neutralised propagating through space, when interacting is becomes positive by Photon electrical effect? 


I do rule out negative.

 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Is a photon positive, negative or neutral?
« Reply #4 on: 29/03/2016 14:19:28 »
Wrong. A photon is electrically neutral.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is a photon positive, negative or neutral?
« Reply #5 on: 29/03/2016 15:40:50 »
Wrong. A photon is electrically neutral.

Ok, so if a photon is always electrical neutral, where does positive come from?   Why can we observe rainbows?  how can radiation kill? 


''The photoelectric effect is the observation that many metals emit electrons when light shines upon them. Electrons emitted in this manner can be called photoelectrons. The phenomenon is commonly studied in electronic physics, as well as in fields of chemistry, such as quantum chemistry or electro-chemistry.

According to classical electromagnetic theory, this effect can be attributed to the transfer of energy from the light to an electron in the metal.'''


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoelectric_effect

A piece of wood is electrical neutral, yet the piece of wood contains loads of positive energy. How is this any different?

''A radiation burn is damage to the skin or other biological tissue caused by exposure to radiation. The radiation types of greatest concern are thermal radiation, radio frequency energy, ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation. The most common type of radiation burn is a sunburn caused by UV radiation.''

Are all the above not photons?

Sunburn is contradictory to neutral......







« Last Edit: 29/03/2016 15:54:00 by Thebox »
 

Offline PmbNEP

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Re: Is a photon positive, negative or neutral?
« Reply #6 on: 29/03/2016 16:24:47 »
Joe - Are you asking whether a photon has charge or not? If so then it's charge is zerp

Quote from: acsinuk
A photon is neutral and is a magnetic vibration when in free space.
Photons are neither electric or magnetic fields. The (Lorentz) force on a charged particle by an electromagnetic wave comes mostly from the electric component of the EM wave.

Quote from: acsinuk
If it interacts with matter; then that electromagnetic magnoflux energy can be captured by a molecule which has an electron enclosure which makes it appears to be a negative charge vibration
That's an inappropriate way to describe the effects of photons interacting with atoms or molecules. If the photon has an energy corresponding to one of the possible energy transitions of the atom/molecule then, if the atom is in the lower energy state corresponding to that difference of energy then the atom goes into the higher energy state while the photon disappears.
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Is a photon positive, negative or neutral?
« Reply #7 on: 29/03/2016 17:16:04 »


Ok, so if a photon is always electrical neutral, where does positive come from?
From the separation of charges by the addition of energy to a neutral system comprised of positive and negative particles.

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Why can we observe rainbows?
Because photons can induce benign temporary chemical changes in our retinas

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how can radiation kill?
Principally, by ionising the water molecules in cytoplasm to produce free radicals which attack the hydrogen bonds of DNA.  But for nonionisng radiation, see below.


Quote
''The photoelectric effect is the observation that many metals emit electrons when light shines upon them. Electrons emitted in this manner can be called photoelectrons. The phenomenon is commonly studied in electronic physics, as well as in fields of chemistry, such as quantum chemistry or electro-chemistry.

According to classical electromagnetic theory, this effect can be attributed to the transfer of energy from the light to an electron in the metal.'''


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoelectric_effect
And Wikipedia is exactly correct.

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A piece of wood is electrical neutral, yet the piece of wood contains loads of positive energy. How is this any different?
because it is meaningless drivel.

Quote
''A radiation burn is damage to the skin or other biological tissue caused by exposure to radiation. The radiation types of greatest concern are thermal radiation, radio frequency energy, ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation. The most common type of radiation burn is a sunburn caused by UV radiation.''

Are all the above not photons?
Yes, they are. The lower energy (nonionising)  photons can promote harmful chemical reactions, stimulate the body to excessive histamine production or directly damage RNA, or simply heat bulk tissue to the point that it sustains permanent damage.

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Sunburn is contradictory to neutral......
On the contrary, neutral does not mean harmless. A bus is electrically neutral but can deliver a fatal dose of kinetic energy to your body.

 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Is a photon positive, negative or neutral?
« Reply #8 on: 29/03/2016 17:31:51 »
From the separation of charges by the addition of energy to a neutral system comprised of positive and negative particles.




HUh? the separation of what charges?  are you saying the photon splits in two? 
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Is a photon positive, negative or neutral?
« Reply #9 on: 29/03/2016 21:17:25 »
Quote from: alancalverd on Today at 17:16:04
From the separation of charges by the addition of energy to a neutral system comprised of positive and negative particles.

HUh? the separation of what charges?  are you saying the photon splits in two?
An example of the effect described by Alan is when a neutral Hydrogen atom is struck by a neutral ultraviolet photon, ejecting the electron, and splitting the neutral Hydrogen atom into a positive proton and negative electron.

The photon does not carry any charge, nor does the photon split in two. The photon provides the energy to separate the pre-existing charges within the neutral Hydrogen atom.

Another example would be the photoelectric effect (mentioned in previous posts). A photon striking the neutral cathode can eject a negative electron, leaving the cathode with an overall positive charge.
 

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Re: Is a photon positive, negative or neutral?
« Reply #9 on: 29/03/2016 21:17:25 »

 

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