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Author Topic: Is Dark matter really the byproduct of matter and antimatter?  (Read 795 times)

Offline PhysicsGamer

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I have a theory on what dark matter and dark energy is. I think dark matter is the byproduct of matter and antimatter, while dark energy is the byproduct of antimatter binding to dark matter. I would like to hear your thoughts on this.
« Last Edit: 31/03/2016 01:30:03 by PhysicsGamer »


 

Offline JoeBrown

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Dark matter is basically mass that doesn't interact electromagnetically.  Light can't shine on it (doesn't reflect off it) and the magnetic field may have no effect.  We can't see it, so we're mostly in the dark about it.

Anti matter - matter reaction are theorized to completely annihilate.  It's believed to be one of the most efficient mass-entergy conversion.  Its used in this fashion in very limited set of circumstances, because anti-matter production and containment are both very difficult to manage, given it's inherit natural reaction with anything not anit-matter.

Basically antimatter is mass that has had it's spin reversed to that of matter.

Dark matter is thought to be a by-product produced of supernova and hypernova events.  The stars that produce the events are the the most densely packed regions of mass (outside of black holes) believed to exist.  The nova event is the most violently explosive events to have left evidence behind.  A lot of this is base on theory but there's lot of evidence that supports it, via cosmological observations.

Black holes are also essentially dark matter, but they have so much highly localized gravity, that the math about them bends and breaks coherence too.  We've seen evidence there's a limited amount of mass that can enter a black hole in a given period of time.  I surmise this produces the nova explosion when a black hole first forms.

Nova episodes are the most violently explosive, densely packed regions of mass, believed to exist outside of the remaining black hole, at the time of the nova event, which is when and where dark matter is primarily produced.

Atoms like their electromagnetic qualities and coherence.  We don't really know why, but it's pretty strong.  They've measured electromagnetism to be orders of magnitude stronger than gravity.  Electromagnetic force has two equal and opposite forces or states, which cancels its effects out to a degree.  Gravity on the other hand is more of a one way operator.  Given enough gravity, gravity beats electromagnetism, which produces star light, heavier atoms and black holes, when they battle (so to speak).

I think of a black hole of as a region where gravity wins out against all (or perhaps most) other arguments.

Now we've tried smashing atoms together.  They produce the most energy when we smash anti-matter and matter together, so atom smashers usually resort to this experiment.  The LHC is the most energetic smashing experiment on Earth (to date, Chinese propose building a bigger one).  They claim they've witnessed evidence of the LHC producing dark matter, or more precisely they saw evidence of the higgs boson.  I tend to believe they're one and the same, but its my opinion and I'm entitled.

I think they'd really like to be able to make dark matter consistently, so they might better understand the structure of the atom.

But to sum it all up, the answer to your question is if antimatter - matter annihilation produces dark matter, probably not.  If so, not very often at all.

Personally I think it requires a lot of mass and the chaos of a nova event.  Tho there is evidence the sun produces dark matter, so it might not take a nova event, just a lot of mass arguing over the electromagnetic, strong/weak nuclear, gravity and time/space arguments.  According to string theory, there's a lot more arguments going on... ;)
« Last Edit: 24/03/2016 14:44:01 by JoeBrown »
 
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Offline PmbNEP

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Quote from: PhysicsGamer
I have a theory on what dark matter and dark energy is. I think dark matter is the byproduct of matter and antimatter, while dark energy is the byproduct of antimatter binding to antimatter. I would like to hear your thoughts on this.
The byproduct of matter and antimatter is simply matter and antimatter again. There is absolutely no reason to think that dark energy is as you speculate. byproduct of antimatter binding to antimatter is just more antimatter if and only if the particles are charged. Dark energy is nothing like anything we've seen before and doesn't behave as you speculate. It doesn't even behave  like ordinary matter in that it behaves just like either negative pressure (i.e. tension) and thus acts like negative mass.
 

Offline PmbNEP

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Quote from: JoeBrown
Anti matter - matter reaction are theorized to completely annihilate.
If you collide an electron with a positron they annihilate producing two photons. When a neutron and an antineutron collide they don't produce only photons.

Quote from: JoeBrown
  It's believed to be one of the most efficient mass-entergy conversion.
For a process to be efficient the process must perform or function in the best possible manner with the least waste of time and effort. However since we're talking about energy your comment doesn't apply to matter/antimatter reactions.

Quote from: JoeBrown
  Its used in this fashion in very limited set of circumstances, because anti-matter production and containment are both very difficult to manage, given it's inherit natural reaction with anything not anit-matter.
Annihilation between matter and antimatter is not very different than any other nuclear  reaction. It's only when matter and it's anti-particle annihilate do they do annihilate each other.

Quote from: JoeBrown
Basically antimatter is mass that has had it's spin reversed to that of matter.
There's more to it than that. The anti-particle to a specific particle also has opposite charge if one of then particle's is charged. Since the antiparticle of a particle of charge q and baryonic number B has charge -q and baryon number -B, it must have also a third isospin component -tz, where tz, is the isospin z-component of the corresponding particle.

Quote from: JoeBrown
Dark matter is thought to be a by-product produced of supernova and hypernova events.
I think you have that wrong. See arxiv dot org slash abs slash astro-ph slash 0411454

Quote from: JoeBrown
Black holes are also essentially dark matter, but they have so much highly localized gravity, that the math about them bends and breaks coherence too.
Before I say anything on this comment, what does coherence mean in this context?

Quote from: JoeBrown
Nova episodes are the most violently explosive, densely packed regions of mass, believed to exist outside of the remaining black hole, at the time of the nova event, which is when and where dark matter is primarily produced.
May I inquire to wheat your source is for this comment please? Thank you.

Quote from: JoeBrown
Gravity on the other hand is more of a one way operator.  Given enough gravity, gravity beats electromagnetism, which produces star light, heavier atoms and black holes, when they battle (so to speak).
If you have matter which produces tension then the effect will be gravitational repulsion. Also under certain distribution of matter which has tension in such as a large field then you will float or accelerate away from the field.                         

Quote from: JoeBrown
Now we've tried smashing atoms together.  They produce the most energy when we smash anti-matter and matter together, so atom smashers usually resort to this experiment.
The amount of energy released from matter/antimatter annihilate changes form. It doesn't produce energy since energy is conserved.

 
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Offline PhysicsGamer

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I have a theory on what dark matter and dark energy is. I think dark matter is the byproduct of matter and antimatter, while dark energy is the byproduct of antimatter binding to antimatter. I would like to hear your thoughts on this.
There is absolutely no reason to think that dark energy is as you speculate. byproduct of antimatter binding to antimatter is just more antimatter
When I said antimatter binding to antimatter, I meant to say antimatter binding to dark matter.
 

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