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Author Topic: Toxoplasmosis: how does one know one's infected, and should I worry?  (Read 45513 times)

Offline iko

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Offline Karen W.

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THat is a great picture Iko! LOL Love it!
 

Offline iko

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THat is a great picture Iko! LOL Love it!

Thanks Karen,

is compulsive-pic-posting one of the first signs of...something?

madkod  [:o)]
 

Offline Karen W.

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I don't know could be, I have learned how and am doing the same.. trying to keep busy with me camera.. LOL Maybe I will get better at it!LOL!
 

Offline iko

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This abstract should be dedicated
to Zoey, she is deeply interested
in this issue...but where is Zoey?



Meta-analysis of three case controlled studies and an ecological study
into the link between cryptogenic epilepsy and chronic toxoplasmosis infection.

Palmer BS.


Barts & The London, Queen Mary's School of Medicine & Dentistry, University of London, United Kingdom.

A meta-analysis was performed on three case controlled studies which examined the relationship between latent toxoplasmosis gondii infection in the immunocompetent host and cryptogenic epilepsy. Further comparison was also made by examining the seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis rates for 17 various countries, cities or regions against the prevalence rates for epilepsy in those regions.
RESULTS: The results for the meta-analysis showed a log-odds ratio of 4.8 which approximates to a similar relative risk, (CI 2.6 to 7.8), with CI for all three studies being above 1. Seroprevalence rates for toxoplasmosis and prevalence rates of epilepsy showed a strong association (p<0.001).
DISCUSSION: The prevalence of toxoplasmosis is an important factor in the prevalence of epilepsy with a probable link in the cryptogenic epilepsies. An area with a reduced burden of toxoplasmosis will also have a reduced burden of epilepsy. Neuropathophysiology findings from various studies show a common physical relationship of microglial nodule formation in Toxoplasma gondii infection and epilepsy. This analysis raises the possibility that one of the many causes of epilepsy may be an infectious agent, or that cryptogenic epilepsy may be a consequence of latent toxoplasmosis infection. This raises the possibility that public health measures to reduce toxoplasmosis infection may also result in a reduction in epilepsy.

Seizure. 2007 Jun 27; [Epub ahead of print]






http://www.fao.org/docrep/003/t0756e/T0756E180.jpg

Toxoplasmosis. Inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). Tachyzoites are distributed throughout the brain where they encysts and produce bradyzoites.

FAO - Manual on meat inspection for developing countries
SPECIFIC DISEASES OF SHEEP AND GOATS
http://www.fao.org/docrep/003/t0756e/T0756E06.htm
« Last Edit: 08/07/2007 09:46:53 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Offline iko

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Warning: this topic has not been posted in for at least 120 days...

...well, I think it's time for a 'refreshing' update!

Parasitosis, dopaminergic modulation and metabolic disturbances in schizophrenia:
evolution of a hypothesis.


Treuer T, Martenyi F, Karagianis J.
Neuroscience Research, Area Medical Center Vienna, Eli Lilly Regional GmbH, Venna, Austria. treuert@lilly.com.

Recent meta-analyses have provided a comprehensive overview of studies investigating Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in schizophrenic patients, thus attempting to clarify the potential role these infections might play in causing schizophrenia.
Issues for further research have been suggested. Associations and theories that may enrich the current level of knowledge with regard to this significant subject deserve attention.
Anti-parasitic agents as well as antipsychotics are effective in treating parasitosis.
Both classes of drugs have been shown to exert dopaminergic activity. Parasites and human organisms have a long history of mutual contact. The effect of parasitosis on the host and the host's response to infection are undoubtedly the product of a long evolutionary process. The neurochemical background of delusions of parasitosis is potentially similar to ancient evolutionary traces of altered neurotransmission and neuropeptide gene expression caused by parasites; these include fungal and viral infections. This is very unique in medicine if a class of drugs is effective in the treatment of an illness but also cures the delusion of the same disorder as well. Furthermore, metabolic disturbances such as hyperglycemia and insulin resistance were reported several decades before the antipsychotic era. Toxoplasmosis may also be linked to insulin resistance. Schizophrenia research can benefit from understanding this evolutionary link. New chemical entities that are liable to alter neurochemical changes related to the brain's perception of the risk of predation secondary to parasites may result in new approaches for the treatment of psychosis. These findings suggest that further research is needed to clarify this evolutionary link between parasite infection and delusions of parasitosis. We believe this model may well open up new avenues of research in the discovery of drugs to counteract schizophrenia.

Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2007 Oct;28(5):535-40.[/size]


for more reading:  http://toxoplasmaparasite.blogspot.com/2007/11/parasitosis-dopaminergic-modulation-and.html

...isn't it just fascinating?
I wish I could grab the whole article:
our library might do this miracle 4me!

Got any suggestions out there?

Cheers,

ikod  [^]

« Last Edit: 19/12/2007 18:48:48 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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...and last, but not least,
an almost 30yrs old report
from Cuba:

Reactivity of toxoplasmin intradermal test
in neurotic and manic-depressive patients.

[Article in Spanish]


Delgado García G, Rodríguez Perdomo E.

Fifty patients with manic-depressive psychosis, 120 neurotics and 100 healthy individuals were studied. They underwent the toxoplasmin intradermal test. The highest percentage of reactors was found among patients with manic-depressive psychosis (66,0%). Patients with depressive neurosis accounted for the highest number among neurotics (55,6%). The intensity of reaction was higher among patients with manic-depressive psychosis. Neurotic patients were compared to schizophrenic patients from a previous study conducted by one out of the authors. It is concluded that the percentage of reactors is higher among patients with depressive mental disorders, and also that this percentage increases with mental deterioration in patients.

Rev Cubana Med Trop. 1980 Jan-Apr;32(1):35-9.


 

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While not wishing to dispute the plausibility of what is being said, but applying my usual scepticism about statistics, the fact that we can detect correlation does not prove causality.  It may simply be that people with psychiatric disorders tend to not integrate well in human society, so prefer the company of animals, which increases their likelihood of infection from those animals.  Equally, it is well known that people with psychiatric disorders tend to be less thorough in terms of hygiene, both their own, and probably their pets - so further increasing the risk of infection.

I am not saying the causality is absent, only that at present, have we anything more than mere correlation?
 

Offline iko

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While not wishing to dispute the plausibility of what is being said, but applying my usual scepticism about statistics, the fact that we can detect correlation does not prove causality.  It may simply be that people with psychiatric disorders tend to not integrate well in human society, so prefer the company of animals, which increases their likelihood of infection from those animals.  Equally, it is well known that people with psychiatric disorders tend to be less thorough in terms of hygiene, both their own, and probably their pets - so further increasing the risk of infection.

I am not saying the causality is absent, only that at present, have we anything more than mere correlation?

...and the winner is...
We seem to have a discussion around here!
Thanks George, you are exactly right, as usual.
 In my personal opinion, the point here is the diagnostic level presently used in the case of a supposed chronic persistent infection by a common pathogen.
If we have to count on concentration of specific antibodies or skin reactions to toxo antigens...we will never reach anything more than a mere correlation.
Searching for protozoa DNA 'bits' - in the circulating white cells, for example - would eventually allow to differentiate active infection from immune 'memory'.
« Last Edit: 03/02/2008 21:12:56 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Hi everybody,

I finally found one of the last year reports mentioned by Chris
last February 2007, that started the discussion about mysterious
"Toxoplasma Psychonnections"!
Enjoy,

ikod  [^]


Parasite gives rats suicidal cat attraction
Tuesday, 3 April 2007by Hilary Jones


http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/node/1139



« Last Edit: 10/02/2008 19:02:33 by iko »
 

Offline Titanscape

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Is there a possible immune weakness in some to toxoplasmic parasites? Is there treatment for parasites? Can one recover from toxoplasm and does it leave damage?

Can cats be treated for such parasites?

Does it matter, as to which part of the brain in which the parasites takes root?

 
 

Offline Zoey

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This abstract should be dedicated
to Zoey, she is deeply interested
in this issue...but where is Zoey?



Meta-analysis of three case controlled studies and an ecological study
into the link between cryptogenic epilepsy and chronic toxoplasmosis infection.

Palmer BS.


Barts & The London, Queen Mary's School of Medicine & Dentistry, University of London, United Kingdom.

A meta-analysis was performed on three case controlled studies which examined the relationship between latent toxoplasmosis gondii infection in the immunocompetent host and cryptogenic epilepsy. Further comparison was also made by examining the seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis rates for 17 various countries, cities or regions against the prevalence rates for epilepsy in those regions.http://www.fao.org/docrep/003/t0756e/T0756E06.htm

:D

It's been a while since I logged in here. Came to this page while searching out information on toxoplasmosis and epilepsy. Iko-if you still roam here, do you have any new information in toxoplasmosis and neurological disorders? Can the infection be treated with cod liver oil?
 

Offline iko

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Dear Zoey!

How are you doing my dearest web-friend?
So much time has passed, but nothing is moving on the leukemia-codliveroil connections.
I'm left with a first citation on Google (leukemia+vitamin) out of zillions...
No discussion anymore: something has been found about vitamin D deficieny and CLL, a chronic leukemia in adults.
So 'something' is moving...50-60 viewers per day make me positive about the whole issue.
Almost every day I wonder about parents that find the CLO message today and have to decide about their own kid.
Nobody is posting, messagin' or anything like that. This makes me think that I did something wrong.
From the very start. Years are passing and vitamin D and leukemia is slowly becoming a reality.
But...How many roads must a man walk down?
Little boy is a happy young adult working in a FogSystem Company in LA as an engineer
and he's taking flight lessons to get a pilot licence just for the fun of it.
As you can easily imagine, I should be the happiest man on earth (>10 years, leuk never comes back!).
It's not like it should be, unfortunately. So I worry for the other 'patients' and...wonder if I did anything wrong
and lost my chance to help people with my very same problem.
Is going to FaceBook a good idea? I do not know, and I'am sort of tired and exhausted in this 'silence'.
If you support an hypothesis and nobody is talking to you (in the wwww. I mean)...well, maybe something is wrong.
And you do not know what you did wrong and what you missed in the process.

Toxoplasmosis. I'am not your expert, I know that 'eradication' treatments are based on simple sulfa-drugs.
They have to be taken for a long period, 'cause these naughty beasts like to hide in our body and survive with us.

I know that's not a big help for my friend Zoey, but She will find better stuff on the internet!
On my part, I give you a BIG hug and a kiss,

Ikod
 

Offline Zoey

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Greetings, Iko,
Nice to hear the good news of your family. This may be a good time to revive the cod liver oil issue for leukemia. There may be more interest in it now than in the past as more is being understood on the role of nutrition in disease--progression and healing.

Facebook or even Yahoo, might be good possibilities for bringing up the CLO topic, especially with the parent's groups. Considering all the research and publicity since Merck bought the CLO company, this may be an excellent time to start the discussion up again. It should not be forgotten!

 A few years ago I moved to Kentucky seeking medical treatment for the spinal cord disorder, big mistake. However, all is well and am starting to write again.

About Toxoplasmosis:
 Supposedly, in it's dormant stage, toxoplasmosis is doing no harm, thus it is often not treated. Further, the drugs used can have such severe side effects, it may be safer to try other treatments, i.e., improve the ability of the immune system to keep the infection in it's dormant stage.
 However, in the dormant phase the slower growing cysts are embedded in the brain and elsewhere in the body. Aren't they having some sort of effect, causing irritation, inflammation to those tissues? If so, would this not help explain slow degenerative phase in some disorders to which it may be linked, i.e. seizures, Parkinson's, schizophrenia? I have some questions to ask about some aspects of disease progression, such as in Parkinson's, and a few others.
 I just published an overview article on toxoplasmosis.  The plan is to do one on epilepsy, and on other conditions that may have a toxoplasma link.

Toxoplasma decor for the home

 
« Last Edit: 05/08/2011 03:06:44 by Zoey »
 

Offline Zoey

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Maybe there is a role for cod liver oil in treating toxoplasmosis. The first study below shows how CD8+ T cells can be mobilized to erradicate the "latent" brain cysts so pervasive in toxoplasmosis . The second  article focuses on the role of vitamins A  and D in the body's immune response. Perhaps everyone who develops seizures or symptoms labeled 'schizophrenic' should be tested for toxoplasmosis and for deficiences of vitamins A and D. 




Am J Pathol. 2010 Apr;176(4):1607-13. Epub 2010 Feb 18.
Removal of Toxoplasma gondii cysts from the brain by perforin-mediated activity of CD8+ T cells.
Suzuki Y, Wang X, Jortner BS, Payne L, Ni Y, Michie SA, Xu B, Kudo T, Perkins S.
Source
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536, USA. yasu.suzuki@uky.edu

Abstract
Chronic infection with Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most common parasitic infections in humans. Formation of tissue cysts is the basis of persistence of the parasite in infected hosts, and this cyst stage has generally been regarded as untouchable. Here we provide the first evidence that the immune system can eliminate T. gondii cysts from the brains of infected hosts when immune T cells are transferred into infected immunodeficient animals that have already developed large numbers of cysts. This T cell-mediated immune process was associated with accumulation of microglia and macrophages around tissue cysts. CD8(+) immune T cells possess a potent activity to remove the cysts. The initiation of this process by CD8(+) T cells does not require their production of interferon-gamma, the major mediator to prevent proliferation of tachyzoites during acute infection, but does require perforin. These results suggest that CD8(+) T cells induce elimination of T. gondii cysts through their perforin-mediated cytotoxic activity. Our findings provide a new mechanism of the immune system to fight against chronic infection with T. gondii and suggest a possibility of developing a novel vaccine to eliminate cysts from patients with chronic infection and to prevent the establishment of chronic infection after a newly acquired infection.

PMID:
20167872
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID: PMC2843452
Free PMC Article

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20167872


Nat Rev Immunol. 2008 Sep;8(9):685-98.
Vitamin effects on the immune system: vitamins A and D take centre stage.
Mora JR, Iwata M, von Andrian UH.
Source
Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. j_rodrigo_mora@harvard.hms.edu

Abstract
Vitamins are essential constituents of our diet that have long been known to influence the immune system. Vitamins A and D have received particular attention in recent years as these vitamins have been shown to have an unexpected and crucial effect on the immune response. We present and discuss our current understanding of the essential roles of vitamins in modulating a broad range of immune processes, such as lymphocyte activation and proliferation, T-helper-cell differentiation, tissue-specific lymphocyte homing, the production of specific antibody isotypes and regulation of the immune response. Finally, we discuss the clinical potential of vitamin A and D metabolites for modulating tissue-specific immune responses and for preventing and/or treating inflammation and autoimmunity.

PMID:
19172691
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID: PMC2906676
Free PMC Article


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2906676/?tool=pmcentrez
« Last Edit: 08/08/2011 05:32:53 by Zoey »
 

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