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Author Topic: Do Tree Growth Rings Appear Closer On the Side facing The Equator ?  (Read 624 times)

Offline neilep

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Dearest Science Peeps of Wondrous Awe,

As a sheepy I of course luff trees . Trees are my all time favourite large woody things with leaves and branches and stuff.


Trees, as ewe know were invented in 1926 by by the famous Dutch Botanist Dr Elm Perrenialdykstra whilst he was quaffing some Hooten Lager and playing Tulips From Amsterdam on his Concertina. Apparently he imbibed so much lager that he accidentally swallowed his concertina and the resultant "business' that plopped out a few hours later was the first ever tree !! A passing bilogist will explain the science behind that !!

look, here's some tree rings ;



Some Tree Rings Literally Moments Ago

Someone told me that the growth rings of trees appear closer on the side facing the equator !..Is this true ?

I spent quite some of my valuable time researching this and studying photos !..almost a whole minute !!...and I simply cant see any evidence to sheeport this.

so,

Do Tree Growth Rings Appear Closer On the Side facing The Equator ?

If ewe can help answer this then i will have knowledge that I did not know and this will make me happy !



Hugs and shmishes


mwah mwah mwah


Sheepy

If ewe can help to ring the truth
Answer this and not be aloof
Then know that i will dance and sing
Receiving the answer of growth tree rings


« Last Edit: 06/05/2016 17:16:48 by neilep »


 

Offline alancalverd

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It's entirely possible that a lone tree would suffer more evaporation from the trunk on the sunny side , but as your photograph shows, there are other factors at work such as traumatic damage, wind stress cracking, soil movement, unbalanced bird poo deposits, neighbouring and competing plants....that will affect the rate of radial growth of individual trees so the overall effect of solar orientation is likely to be subtle and statistical.
 
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Offline Colin2B

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I've heard the same as Alan that differences in water content can cause this. In my hobby I work with a wide variety of temperate and tropical woods, but I've never come across this effect causing a significant difference.
The most noticeable effect is where trees lean, the difference between the compression and tension causes differential growth. It also occurs in branch wood which is under tension/compression due to the weight of the branch. The tech term is reaction wood and you should be able to find info on the net if you search this term.
As most plants grow towards the light, you might see an effect on the south side, but as Alan says it will generally be overwhelmed by other factors eg prevailing wind.
 
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