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Author Topic: The Hawking Big Bang  (Read 690 times)

Online jeffreyH

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The Hawking Big Bang
« on: 07/05/2016 18:15:57 »
We can think of the big bang as happening to a cosmologically large black hole that was present in a larger cosmic bulk. This black hole would have to have accumulated mass over time at a greater rate than that of any Hawking radiation being emitted. How can we perceive what the state of this system would have to be that would subsequently allow it to expand at an inflationary rate? How would this relate to the state of the event horizon and the relationship of its area to entropy? Could a breakdown in cross horizon particle entanglements be the initiator?


 
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Online jeffreyH

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Re: The Hawking Big Bang
« Reply #1 on: 08/05/2016 16:04:41 »
Consider a region of space with an imaginary spherical surface enclosing it. This surface can be said to encode the states contained within the enclosed region. For a straight line trajectory towards the centre of our imaginary sphere can we describe an infinite sequence of expanding shells through which our particle travels? Not if Beckenstein is correct that there is a finite limit on the entropy contained within a region of space related to the area of the enclosing surface.

For supermassive black holes the region of the event horizon has no significant tidal forces at the event horizon. It is just like any ordinary space. This being the case then the event horizon surface entropy should be modified by any increase in tidal forces since the entropy would be distributed over a larger range of shells for a given amount of time. For black holes nearing the Planck mass in size this has to have consequences. Could these tidal forces have any effect on entanglement? Could this result in a relationship between the time taken to evaporate and the affects of tidal forces on Hawking radiation via entanglement? So that the rate of radiation in this case outpaces the rate of matter consumption. There should be a black hole mass size at which the rate of radiation is then identical to the rate of mass consumption. This all dependes upon the availability of matter in the close vicinity of the event horizon. Black holes that accrete from partner stars are possible candidates. All that remains is to calculate this critical mass. This will be the lower mass limit for stable black holes.
 

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Re: The Hawking Big Bang
« Reply #2 on: 08/05/2016 19:00:27 »
Consider an enclosed cubic volume of space. Let's say this is microscopically small but still detectable. If we can put high energy particles in one at a time then as the density increases with the accompanying increase in pressure then the overall kinetic energy will decrease. The boundary of this region, if considered a holographic representation, then records a system tending towards an ordered state. This is simply due to a confined space experiencing an increase in density. What does this say about black hole entropy? Does it only apply before black hole collapse completes or does it persist beyond the event horizon?
 

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Re: The Hawking Big Bang
« Reply #3 on: 10/05/2016 21:47:27 »
If we consider the increase in kinetic energy of quarks to be a significant contribution to relativistic mass then as that kinetic energy approaches light speed it will of necessity have a limiting action on forward motion. Otherwise the system as a whole could then violate the restriction of subluminal motion. Thus it gets proportionally harder to accelerate a mass. This could also explain how interaction between systems slow down. That is they experience time dilation.
 

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Re: The Hawking Big Bang
« Reply #4 on: 12/05/2016 01:24:16 »
If we wind back the big bang then the first two forces to merge are the weak nuclear and the electromagnetic forces. We can maybe relate this merger to the photon sphere surrounding a black hole. During the big bang the first force to separate was gravity followed by the strong nuclear force. Since it may be that gluons and gravitons are related in some profound way there needs to be a way of working out how to represent this part of the merger of the forces.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: The Hawking Big Bang
« Reply #5 on: 12/05/2016 19:13:07 »
Consider a region of space with an imaginary spherical surface enclosing it.

Let us not consider an imaginary spherical surface and let us discuss the facts of the visual spherical radius of light and the visual contractions of objects relative to an increasing ''length'' of light apart of two observers. Relativity states that two observers in motion can not agree who is moving relative to each other, from either observers perspective when travelling a linear velocity away from each other, both observers observe each other red shifting, ''like the bird turns its head and ''changes'' colour''.
The ''matter'' interferes with a static light , light only moves from cdca247f7994f232db1fb4da88755518.gif, then is static. Spectral colour is ''observer'' effect, the imaginary sphere you seek is the radius of light, a black hole is not a black hole, it is a light hole, but it is to small or to far away to ''see''.
All ''matter'' are light holes, all light holes are spherical, but not all light holes can be seen.
Observe the light hole train travelling away from you and visually contracting to a 0 point source, the train as just become a ''black hole'' but is still a light hole.


Quote from: Jeff
If we wind back the big bang then the first two forces to merge are the weak nuclear and the electromagnetic forces. We can maybe relate this merger to the photon sphere surrounding a black hole. During the big bang the first force to separate was gravity followed by the strong nuclear force. Since it may be that gluons and gravitons are related in some profound way there needs to be a way of working out how to represent this part of the merger of the forces.

The strong nuclear force is gravity, break the strong nuclear force and ''bang''.






 

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Re: The Hawking Big Bang
« Reply #5 on: 12/05/2016 19:13:07 »

 

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