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Author Topic: In the Large Hadron Collider does time dilation affect the colliding particles?  (Read 2846 times)

Offline Alan McDougall

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Yet paradoxically if a person stood in the exact middle or path of the two  mountains approaching him at 90% light speed, they would "crash" into him at a less than combined speed of light say 98% c?

Alan
 

Offline JohnDuffield

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IMHO the way to understand this is to remember the wave nature of matter, and appreciate that if we were made of sound waves along with our rods and clocks, we would never measure our own speed as exceeding the speed of sound.

In similar vein you never measure your own speed to be exceeding c, even though in the relativistic rocket you can "travel across the galaxy in just 12 years of your own time".
 

Offline JohnDuffield

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By the way, if two light beams are heading towards each other at c, the gap between them is reducing at 2c. It's similar for protons moving towards each other at 0.9999c at the LHC. Their closing speed is just under 2c, even though the velocity addition formula is applicable to the speed of one as measured by the other. 
 

Offline jeffreyH

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IMHO the way to understand this is to remember the wave nature of matter, and appreciate that if we were made of sound waves along with our rods and clocks, we would never measure our own speed as exceeding the speed of sound.

So in effect what you are implying is that matter is made out of light waves. In which case everything in the universe is traveling at the speed of light. Nice one John.

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In similar vein you never measure your own speed to be exceeding c, even though in the relativistic rocket you can "travel across the galaxy in just 12 years of your own time".
 

Offline agyejy

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Yet paradoxically if a person stood in the exact middle or path of the two  mountains approaching him at 90% light speed, they would "crash" into him at a less than combined speed of light say 98% c?

Alan

Each individual mountain would crash into him at 90% of the speed of light. I'm not sure what you mean by combined speed as it really isn't a scientific term (or at least I've never heard it) and as such I have no idea how one would calculate a "combined speed". Some quick googling turns up the "Combined Speed Formula" which law enforcement officers use to estimate the original speed of a vehicle in a complex accident but I don't think that it was you meant.
« Last Edit: 31/05/2016 11:13:47 by evan_au »
 

Offline hamdani yusuf

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According to a stationary observer, particle A move from left to right at 0.9 c while particle B move from right to left also at 0.9 c.
Let's assume particle A & B have the same mass, m.
According to a stationary observer, combined system of both particles have 0 total momentum.
If second observer move to the left at 0.9 c, what are the velocities of each particle, and what is the system's momentum according to him?
 

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