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Author Topic: will this Kilogram definition be valid?  (Read 437 times)

Offline Yahya A. Sharif

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will this Kilogram definition be valid?
« on: 23/05/2016 16:58:37 »
 the Kilogram is defined as artifact prototype  rather than the meter which is defined according to speed of light however, I have a definition that may be both simple and good:
"the Kilogram is a mass of a ball when it rotates in one meter radius it would be pulled by one newton force towards its center of rotation." for the force just a scale will be valid to measure it everywhere.
this happens everywhere in space and any ball of any material will subject to the same centripetal force, considering that rotating of objects around a center is a phenomenon in both atomic physics and astronomy.
« Last Edit: 23/05/2016 17:22:26 by Yahya »


 

Offline RD

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Re: will this Kilogram definition be valid?
« Reply #1 on: 23/05/2016 17:21:31 »
...definition ... the Kilogram is a mass of a ball when it rotates in one meter radius it would be pulled by one newton force towards its center of rotation.

The centrifugal force will depend on how fast your olympic hammer is spinning, you haven't specified that speed in your definition.

« Last Edit: 23/05/2016 17:32:55 by RD »
 

Offline Yahya A. Sharif

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Re: will this Kilogram definition be valid?
« Reply #2 on: 23/05/2016 17:44:08 »
" The Kilogram is a mass of a ball spinning in one meter radius circle with frequency 1/2π Hz  subject to one newton centripetal  force"
 

Offline chiralSPO

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Re: will this Kilogram definition be valid?
« Reply #3 on: 23/05/2016 17:45:04 »
" The Kilogram is a mass of a ball spinning in one meter radius circle with frequency 1/2π Hz  subject to one newton centripetal  force"

...and the definition of a Newton is?
 

Offline Yahya A. Sharif

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Re: will this Kilogram definition be valid?
« Reply #4 on: 23/05/2016 18:01:10 »
the newton may have alternative definition , which is the force to make  displacement in meters in a spring with particular metal and particular dimensions .
« Last Edit: 23/05/2016 18:03:11 by Yahya »
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: will this Kilogram definition be valid?
« Reply #5 on: 23/05/2016 18:21:03 »
Problem then is that you have returned to a manufactured material standard and a force dependent on g, which varies from place to place. The aim of standards committees is to replace material standards with absolutely reproducible natural phenomena. 
 
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Re: will this Kilogram definition be valid?
« Reply #5 on: 23/05/2016 18:21:03 »

 

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