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Author Topic: Where is the missing natural antimatter of our universe?  (Read 442 times)

Offline Alan McDougall

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At the moment of the Big Bang equal amounts of energy and matter and antimatter and anti-energy were created.

They should have annihilated each other shortly after emerging and creating the universe, leaving just a gamma ray dead universe behind.

(The universe was in a state of non-synchronicity at the beginning of time?)

Luckily for us this did not happen but why not guys?

Alan

« Last Edit: 24/05/2016 08:44:37 by chris »


 

Offline chris

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Re: Where is the missing natural antimatter of our universe?
« Reply #1 on: 24/05/2016 08:46:01 »
That, Alan, is not just a million dollar question but a Nobel Prize-winning question if you can answer it! Physicists haven't the foggiest where the antimatter has gone. As you contend, when the Universe formed there should have been equal amounts of matter and antimatter. Why the balance has become totally skewed since, no one knows...
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Where is the missing natural antimatter of our universe?
« Reply #2 on: 24/05/2016 11:54:02 »
Quote from: Alan McDougall
At the moment of the Big Bang equal amounts of energy and matter and antimatter and anti-energy were created.
I'm not sure about anti-energy - are you referring to Dark Energy?

In experiments that we conduct today, intense energy is converted into equal amounts of matter and antimatter, so it is the common hypothesis that this is what happened at the Big Bang.

Quote
but why not guys?
For some of the current theories, see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baryon_asymmetry
 

Offline Alan McDougall

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Re: Where is the missing natural antimatter of our universe?
« Reply #3 on: 24/05/2016 18:06:06 »
Quote from: Alan McDougall
At the moment of the Big Bang equal amounts of energy and matter and antimatter and anti-energy were created.
I'm not sure about anti-energy - are you referring to Dark Energy?

In experiments that we conduct today, intense energy is converted into equal amounts of matter and antimatter, so it is the common hypothesis that this is what happened at the Big Bang.

Quote
but why not guys?
For some of the current theories, see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baryon_asymmetry

You are right there is no such thing an anti-energy my mistake.

Dark energy is a supposed repulsive force that drives the expansion of the universe against its gravity pull.

Even :Dark Energy" still exist as an unproved theory as to what drives really drives the acceleration of the universe. Another theory is "Einsteins Cosmological Constant" which he used in his equations to satisfy other scientist of the time, who insisted that the universe, was infinite, static and eternal.

Without this constant inserted into his equation, which he called "His greatest Blunder" the universe should have been expanding as Edwin Hubble proved indeed it was.

His equation to keep the universe static , if reversed almost accurately, explains the accelerating expansion of the universe as we now see it .

This constant is by far the most precise in all of nature some  1:10 to the power of 120 or 1,000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001

By the way every time someone thinks he has proved Einstein wrong advances in physics and science prove him right! 

Alan
 

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Re: Where is the missing natural antimatter of our universe?
« Reply #3 on: 24/05/2016 18:06:06 »

 

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