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Author Topic: What would Earth look like from the surface of a neutron star?  (Read 551 times)

Offline Alan McDougall

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What do you think beings living on a neutron star, would perceive, if they could look at what was happening on earth?

Time flow on a neutron star, should almost be static relative to that on earth?

Alan
« Last Edit: 27/05/2016 13:51:08 by chris »


 

Offline evan_au

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A being living on a neutron star, at a temperature of millions of degrees would not see Earth at all - it would be shrouded in an impenetrable blackness at almost absolute zero.
- The time dilation on the surface of a neutron star would be considerable.
- But creatures living there would not be made of proteins, so a comparison of perceived time is meaningless.
- Due to the extreme energies floating around at these temperatures, any life processes might proceed at a prodigious rate.

Physicist* Robert Forward wrote a science fiction novel speculating on the possibility of life on a neutron star: Dragon's Egg.
*His thesis was on detecting gravitational waves...
 

Offline jeffreyH

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I recommend Dragon's Egg as a very good read.
 

Offline Alan McDougall

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A being living on a neutron star, at a temperature of millions of degrees would not see Earth at all - it would be shrouded in an impenetrable blackness at almost absolute zero.
- The time dilation on the surface of a neutron star would be considerable.
- But creatures living there would not be made of proteins, so a comparison of perceived time is meaningless.
- Due to the extreme energies floating around at these temperatures, any life processes might proceed at a prodigious rate.

Physicist* Robert Forward wrote a science fiction novel speculating on the possibility of life on a neutron star: Dragon's Egg.
*His thesis was on detecting gravitational waves...

I know that they would not be able see earth, which should have been obvious to you. It was a hypothetical question not based of any reality.

Thus, would the beings held in the huge gravity field of the neutron star, live at such a slow rate relative to us of earth that the might see us as entities moving at such a rate, that we would be a almost impossible to observe, flashing blurs of activity?


Likewise if we could do the reverse the process and observe them, would we, as an example, have to wait for a thousand , or more years,  before we see them take one step forward on its hypothetical legs?
 

Offline evan_au

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Quote
they might see us as entities moving at such a rate, that we would be a almost impossible to observe, flashing blurs of activity?
General Relativity says that if you compared the speed of protein-based life near a neutron star with protein-based life on Earth, things on Earth would flash by. However, proteins are not stable on a neutron star.

Since life on a neutron star is pure speculation, anything is possible.
Dragon's Egg imagines creatures that are incredibly thin (due to the gravity) and extremely small (single cells visible under a microscope) and distorted in a North-South direction by the extreme magnetic field.

This novel imagines a lifetime lived far faster than human lifetimes, so that an entire civilization develops and creates space flight by the time a human spacecraft explores a small part of the neutron star. (Lifting a spacecraft off a neutron star would require technologies far beyond anything humans have built; we can barely get loads off the Earth.)

If you want to speculate, I recommend reading Dragon's Egg - written by someone who understands the physics (as far as anyone does).
 

Offline jeffreyH

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And don't put your nose too near the glass. ;D
 

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