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Author Topic: Will an object ''contract'' to a singularity at the ''speed'' of light?  (Read 578 times)

Offline Thebox

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If an object could travel away from a light source at the near ''speed'' of light or the ''speed'' of light, the object would not gain any energy from the ''trailing light'' and without ''entropy'' gain the object would only have ''entropy'' loss and contract to a denser ''mass'' and become a ''cold'' object?

« Last Edit: 29/05/2016 08:36:00 by Thebox »


 

Offline evan_au

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This description sounds like what happens when you release a pressurized gas through a nozzle. It becomes colder, and it is to do with entropy.

However, applied to a space rocket, this description sounds rather fractured.
A space rocket travelling near c and striking a grain of dust will suffer a massively hot explosion.
And the only space rockets we know are incredibly inefficient, and will get quite hot.

...and I don't understand the reference to a singularity in the title, as it appears to have nothing to do with the question?
 

Offline Thebox

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...and I don't understand the reference to a singularity in the title, as it appears to have nothing to do with the question?

When I was considering my question for some reason I considered a singularity although I am now not sure at this time why I did put singularity or I even know what singularity means. I think maybe I mentioned it because of my own ideas and ''Thebox singularity'', I think the word is rather ambiguous and has many meanings.
By singularity in this instance I think I might mean something along the lines of that the object ''matter'' ''tries'' to compress to a 0 dimension because entropy gain is the only ''thing'' that stops an absolute contraction and a ''big bang''.

I also imagine that a particle ''striking'' a rocket that was travelling at c would make a ''huge hot explosion'', although the particle  may possibly pass through the rocket like a ''bullet'' passing through a less dense object than the bullets speed.  >Speed=>force? 
The rockets get quite ''hot'' on re-entry don't they?


 

Offline jeffreyH

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Cosmic rays are atomic nuclei, of mainly hydrogen and helium, that are ejected from supernovas at near light speeds. These hit the upper atmosphere on a regular basis. It may be worthwhile for you to read up on cosmic rays. This may not only answer your initial question but clear up others.
 

Offline lightarrow

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If an object could travel away from a light source at the near ''speed'' of light or the ''speed'' of light, the object would not gain any energy from the ''trailing light'' and without ''entropy'' gain the object would only have ''entropy'' loss and contract to a denser ''mass'' and become a ''cold'' object?
Sincerely I haven't understood all of what you are saying.
Anyway, *in this exact moment* I am travelling very near to light speed c, with respect to some very fast elementary particle, but I'm not a singularity at all...
If you don't have understood my answer you can ask.

--
lightarrow
 

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