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Author Topic: Should we consider revising gravitational equation to compensate for dark energy  (Read 305 times)

Offline impyre

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I'm just going to go ahead and apologize if my ignorance is showing.

I've had an idea about gravity for a while now.
What if it weren't limited to pull forces only, but included a push force as well?
My hypothesis is that the "push" force associated with gravity is negligible with small distances and becomes great at large distances. This would explain why the largest empty spaces have the greatest concentrations of dark energy.

I was thinking something like this: Gm1m2 * (3c5f118d45d3bc6e02d66baee59a8043.gif)

Where A and B affect the distance at which the push force becomes significant.
While this does produce discrepancies between forces predicted by this equation and the original equation, they could be made arbitrarily small. The real question is how could this hypothesis be tested in that case? Since making the discrepancy arbitrarily small would likely make confirmation of a push force through experimentation equally small.

I look forward to feedback, suggestions, and/or correction.
Thanks.
« Last Edit: 31/05/2016 08:08:00 by impyre »


 

Offline impyre

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I think I have a way to potentially disprove this hypothesis. For A or B there is a finite range of reasonable values if at least one is fixed given systems we know are stable (or at least stable up to this point). This creates bounds on acceptable "system density", with any system of bodies beneath this density beginning to break up, and those below it potentially stable. In practice it should be fairly easy to spot systems that shouldn't appear stable but do.
 

Offline impyre

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I eventually came to the conclusion that this is a seriously flawed hypothesis.
 

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