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Author Topic: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?  (Read 11663 times)

Offline chris

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #25 on: 16/06/2016 17:17:48 »

So then what's the point of reposting questions that the author can't and/or doesn't respond to?

If we're not actually responding to anyone.... then none of this makes any sense.

When people email questions to us, or submit them via the feedback form on the front page of the website, the questions are processed and marshalled and then published, on behalf of the submitter, into this forum under the correct category.

48h after the question appears here, the sender automatically receives an email alerting them to the relevant thread containing their question (and hopefully our answers) as well as presenting them with a link to register for the forum.

Some are content just to read the answers; others do indeed join up.

I hope that explains the system to your satisfaction.

 

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #26 on: 16/06/2016 17:21:17 »
hemotrophic bacteria

Can you please tell me more about these "hemotrophic bacteria"? I'm intrigued because, as a medical microbiologist, I've never come across such an entity.
 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #27 on: 17/06/2016 15:26:08 »

So then what's the point of reposting questions that the author can't and/or doesn't respond to?

If we're not actually responding to anyone.... then none of this makes any sense.

When people email questions to us, or submit them via the feedback form on the front page of the website, the questions are processed and marshalled and then published, on behalf of the submitter, into this forum under the correct category.

48h after the question appears here, the sender automatically receives an email alerting them to the relevant thread containing their question (and hopefully our answers) as well as presenting them with a link to register for the forum.

Some are content just to read the answers; others do indeed join up.

I hope that explains the system to your satisfaction.

Thank you for the detailed response.
 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #28 on: 17/06/2016 16:02:35 »
hemotrophic bacteria

Can you please tell me more about these "hemotrophic bacteria"? I'm intrigued because, as a medical microbiologist, I've never come across such an entity.

hemotropic (hē-mō-trŏp′ĭk) [″ + tropos, turning]
Attracted to or having an affinity for blood or blood cells.
REFERENCE:Medical Dictionary, 2009 Farlex and Partners


Hemotropic mycoplasmas (hemoplasmas) are obligate epierythrocytic, cell wall-deficient bacteria that cause not-yet-curable infections in numerous animal species, including human beings. In general, these bacteria induce persistent asymptomatic intravascular infections in domestic and wild animals and are not considered to be highly pathogenic. Therefore, hemotropic mycoplasma infections are often chronic and occult in nature; however, hemolytic anemia of variable severity, often in association with other infectious or noninfectious diseases, has been reported in animals (15). Disease manifestations in animals are most often reported in association with drug- or retrovirus-induced immunosuppression, with stressors such as poor nutrition, pregnancy, or lactation, or with concurrent infection with another, more virulent pathogen (611).

Hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. represent emerging, zoonotic pathogens that pose poorly defined health risks for animals and humans throughout the world.

EXCERPT: J Clin Microbiol. 2013 Oct; 51(10): 32373241.
doi:  10.1128/JCM.01125-13
PMCID: PMC3811635
Infection with Hemotropic Mycoplasma Species in Patients with or without Extensive Arthropod or Animal Contact




A patient with chronic moderate neutropenia, acute hemolysis, and pyrexia was found to be infected with a novel hemoplasma species. A clinical response to doxycyline was noted, and moxifloxacin was added subsequently to aid infection clearance. This represents the first report of hemolysis in association with confirmed hemoplasma infection in a human.

Hemoplasmas infect many mammalian species and can induce life-threatening hemolytic anemia [2]. Human hemoplasma-like infections have been reported occasionally in immunocompromised patients by means of cytological diagnosis, which is known to be very unreliable [1, 3]. PCR methods are now used to investigate human hemoplasma infections. Limited human epidemiological studies have failed to detect infections [1, 4]. Although human hemoplasma infections have been reported in China [5, 6], these descriptions have not described clinical disease, PCR methodology, or infecting species, making interpretation difficult. Other studies have described the presence of existing veterinary hemoplasma species DNA in humans: Mycoplasma suis [7, 8], Mycoplasma haemofelis and/or Mycoplasma haemocanis [9, 10], and Mycoplasma ovis [11].

EXCERPT:
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Dec 1; 53(11): e147e151.
Published online 2011 Oct 21. doi:  10.1093/cid/cir666
PMCID: PMC3205199
A Novel Hemotropic Mycoplasma (Hemoplasma) in a Patient With Hemolytic Anemia and Pyrexia

 

Offline IAMREALITY

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #29 on: 17/06/2016 16:43:52 »
hemotrophic bacteria

Can you please tell me more about these "hemotrophic bacteria"? I'm intrigued because, as a medical microbiologist, I've never come across such an entity.

hemotropic (hē-mō-trŏp′ĭk) [″ + tropos, turning]
Attracted to or having an affinity for blood or blood cells.
REFERENCE:Medical Dictionary, 2009 Farlex and Partners


Hemotropic mycoplasmas (hemoplasmas) are obligate epierythrocytic, cell wall-deficient bacteria that cause not-yet-curable infections in numerous animal species, including human beings. In general, these bacteria induce persistent asymptomatic intravascular infections in domestic and wild animals and are not considered to be highly pathogenic. Therefore, hemotropic mycoplasma infections are often chronic and occult in nature; however, hemolytic anemia of variable severity, often in association with other infectious or noninfectious diseases, has been reported in animals (15). Disease manifestations in animals are most often reported in association with drug- or retrovirus-induced immunosuppression, with stressors such as poor nutrition, pregnancy, or lactation, or with concurrent infection with another, more virulent pathogen (611).

Hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. represent emerging, zoonotic pathogens that pose poorly defined health risks for animals and humans throughout the world.

EXCERPT: J Clin Microbiol. 2013 Oct; 51(10): 32373241.
doi:  10.1128/JCM.01125-13
PMCID: PMC3811635
Infection with Hemotropic Mycoplasma Species in Patients with or without Extensive Arthropod or Animal Contact




A patient with chronic moderate neutropenia, acute hemolysis, and pyrexia was found to be infected with a novel hemoplasma species. A clinical response to doxycyline was noted, and moxifloxacin was added subsequently to aid infection clearance. This represents the first report of hemolysis in association with confirmed hemoplasma infection in a human.

Hemoplasmas infect many mammalian species and can induce life-threatening hemolytic anemia [2]. Human hemoplasma-like infections have been reported occasionally in immunocompromised patients by means of cytological diagnosis, which is known to be very unreliable [1, 3]. PCR methods are now used to investigate human hemoplasma infections. Limited human epidemiological studies have failed to detect infections [1, 4]. Although human hemoplasma infections have been reported in China [5, 6], these descriptions have not described clinical disease, PCR methodology, or infecting species, making interpretation difficult. Other studies have described the presence of existing veterinary hemoplasma species DNA in humans: Mycoplasma suis [7, 8], Mycoplasma haemofelis and/or Mycoplasma haemocanis [9, 10], and Mycoplasma ovis [11].

EXCERPT:
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Dec 1; 53(11): e147e151.
Published online 2011 Oct 21. doi:  10.1093/cid/cir666
PMCID: PMC3205199
A Novel Hemotropic Mycoplasma (Hemoplasma) in a Patient With Hemolytic Anemia and Pyrexia


So basically, this is almost certainly what the patient does not have. 

By what method have you drawn such an absurd conclusion that this is what the patient is suffering from? 
 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #30 on: 17/06/2016 23:11:22 »
So basically, this is almost certainly what the patient does not have. 

By what method have you drawn such an absurd conclusion that this is what the patient is suffering from?

Speaking of absurdity.... I guess I'll have to make bold/bright red text for you since it's blatantly obvious you have no concept of physiology or pharmacology whatsoever. You did at least catch the part of this thread where the author said his son had mycoplasma  & rickettsia.... and that his son hasn't gotten any better right?

How about a compromised immune system - do you understand the significance here?


Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, Borrelia, Brucella, etc. or viruses such as CMV, HHV6, EV or enterovirus, etc.) can invade virtually every human tissue and can compromise the immune system, permitting opportunistic infections by other bacteria, viruses, fungi and yeast. Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, Borrelia, Rickettsia and other pathogens can also directly damage and kill nerve cells in a process called apoptosis, resulting in nervous system degeneration.

When mycoplasmas exit certain cells, such as synovial cells, nerve cells, among others that can be infected, they can stimulate an autoimmune response.
This can occur by different mechanisms. One mechanism that has intrigued us is that when certain microorganisms, such as certain species of mycoplasmas, exit from invaded cells, they carry part of the host cell membrane on their surface. This may trigger the immune system to respond to the host antigens on the foreign microorganism. Alternatively, some microorganisms display surface antigens that mimic host cell surface antigens, and these may stimulate autoimmune responses.


EXCERPT FROM:
Autoimmune Illnesses and
Degenerative Diseases

Prof. Garth L. Nicolson

Rheumatoid Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis, Lupus, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Scleroderma and other Autoimmune and Degenerative Diseases

http://www.immed.org/illness/autoimmune_illness_research.html
 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #31 on: 17/06/2016 23:20:50 »
Your ignorance on this topic is astounding, and I'd wager to most readers you're making yourself look like a fool.  Again, your thinking is so two decades ago.  CFS has since been proven as real.  That's a medical fact.  So I implore you, lest you continue to make yourself the fool, please actually research the subject, using information and fact from the current day, not from 2 decades ago, so that you may more intelligently engage in this topic.

I have presented & offered pertinent scientific information to the topic in question. All you've done is babble - which will do nothing to help his son.

You know what's real about CFS? ..... The symptoms.

You know what's bogus about CFS..... The diagnosis.

Implying that CFS is where the etiology of all these symptoms begins is just nonsensical.

 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #32 on: 17/06/2016 23:36:20 »
So I would ask you to do some research on the topic and educate yourself on the realities, prior to answering questions on it as if you know what you're talking about; when it's quite clear you don't.

Oh really now?

Would you care to critique my comments regarding the marked decrements of intracellular glutathione levels then?

How about giving us a treatment modality and we'll compare it to mine.... then we'll see if you still feel the same?

I'm still waiting....
 

Offline IAMREALITY

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #33 on: 18/06/2016 06:41:32 »
Your ignorance on this topic is astounding, and I'd wager to most readers you're making yourself look like a fool.  Again, your thinking is so two decades ago.  CFS has since been proven as real.  That's a medical fact.  So I implore you, lest you continue to make yourself the fool, please actually research the subject, using information and fact from the current day, not from 2 decades ago, so that you may more intelligently engage in this topic.

I have presented & offered pertinent scientific information to the topic in question. All you've done is babble - which will do nothing to help his son.

You know what's real about CFS? ..... The symptoms.

You know what's bogus about CFS..... The diagnosis.

Implying that CFS is where the etiology of all these symptoms begins is just nonsensical.

Again, your ignorance on this topic is astounding. And you've posted nothing but a bunch of malarkey, and nothing that will be helpful to the person who asked the question whatsoever.  And you continue to repeat the ridiculous assertion that cfs isn't real, when it's been proven that it is.  Proven. That means fact.  That means your ignorant opinion otherwise cannot change that fact.  Educate yourself on the topic son, then come back here.  As of now, a discussion with you is worthless so long as you're gonna keep holding obviously false sentiments with wilful ignorance when a 2 second google search can show you the facts and that you're wrong.  No, he isn't suffering from what you say.  In fact, it's probably the last thing he's suffering from, since according to your post it's rarer than rare in humans. I'm not even sure you have any idea whatsoever as to what you're talking about.  But so long as you're going to continue denying the reality, the proven fact, that cfs is real, then you're quite simply going to continue to be wrong.  Educate yourself.  Do the Google search.  Overcome your decades old outdated and ignorant positions..  You can do it, I have faith..
 

Offline IAMREALITY

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #34 on: 18/06/2016 06:46:02 »
So I would ask you to do some research on the topic and educate yourself on the realities, prior to answering questions on it as if you know what you're talking about; when it's quite clear you don't.

Oh really now?

Would you care to critique my comments regarding the marked decrements of intracellular glutathione levels then?

How about giving us a treatment modality and we'll compare it to mine.... then we'll see if you still feel the same?

I'm still waiting....

I find it mind blowing that you think you're actually saying anything of value here. It's all malarkey. I'm not gonna give the malarkey credibility by actually having a serious discussion about it, as if it's worthy of it.  It's not.  It's just malarkey. There's no further discussion on it that needs to be had.  Like I said, educate yourself on cfs first. Actually get yourself some knowledge on it.  Maybe then we could have a discussion..
 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #35 on: 18/06/2016 11:39:46 »
you're wrong.  No, he isn't suffering from what you say.  In fact, it's probably the last thing he's suffering from

rofl..... Go play in traffic.

Quote from: KEITH DIPLOCK
My son has two strains of rickettsia and mycoplasma

 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #36 on: 18/06/2016 22:17:09 »
Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, Borrelia, Brucella, etc. or viruses such as CMV, HHV6, EV or enterovirus, etc.) can invade virtually every human tissue and can compromise the immune system, permitting opportunistic infections by other bacteria, viruses, fungi and yeast. Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, Borrelia, Rickettsia and other pathogens can also directly damage and kill nerve cells in a process called apoptosis, resulting in nervous system degeneration.

When mycoplasmas exit certain cells, such as synovial cells, nerve cells, among others that can be infected, they can stimulate an autoimmune response. This can occur by different mechanisms. One mechanism that has intrigued us is that when certain microorganisms, such as certain species of mycoplasmas, exit from invaded cells, they carry part of the host cell membrane on their surface. This may trigger the immune system to respond to the host antigens on the foreign microorganism.

The following case-subjects all have fatigue as a common denominator - some of which were originally misdiagnosed with "CFS":

Quote
Male - 12 years old.
For 3 months. Returning from camp, he developed encephalitis. He was hospitalised for 1 week, and was discharged with serious aggressive tendencies and depression. He was initially diagnosed as a psychopath, by 3 different psychiatrists. He was treated with antidepressants and sedatives, and was on the point of being admitted to a psychiatric hospital. The second diagnosis: chronic rickettsial infection. He was given 3 courses of treatment of tetracyclines and stopped all other medication. He subsequently became a school prefect and his condition is maintained to the present day.

Female - 52 years old.
First diagnosed as M.E. after 6 years of fatigue. Neurological symptoms then appeared. The second diagnosis was Multiple Sclerosis. She was treated repeatedly with cortisone for her many relapses. She eventually was confined to a wheelchair for most of the time. She eventually came to see me and her blood tests showed chronic active rickettsial and chlamydial infection. She was treated for 18 months with pulse antibiotic therapy and stays in remission since 1994.

Male - 26 years old.
He was tired, depressed and complained of body pains for 4 years. Diagnosed as positive for rickettsia, chlamydia and mycoplasma. He was improving well after 3 treatments, but was then hospitalised for hepatitis. During his stay in hospital he developed pneumonia, and required intensive care. He tested positive again for mycoplasma and was treated for it successfully.

Female - 26 years.
Was an insulin dependant, stabilized diabetic since the age of 15. She became very tired and depressed after working in a nursery school, where she came into contact with head lice. She was hospitalised many times for hypoglycemia (severe lowering of blood sugar) in a comatose state - no longer stable. She saw a psychiatrist, but her depression did not improve and also she complained of joint pains. After establishing active rickettsial infection through blood tests, she was treated with tetracycline pulse therapy for 6 months and recovered completely. Her diabetes is stable again.

Female - 50 years old.
Has been fatigued for years and despite seeking medical help, her condition keeps on deteriorating. Later on, she is hospitalised for a myocardial infarction, while she is showing the first symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Shortly after this, epileptic fits happen more and more frequently and become difficult to control. Three years after the epileptic onset, she undergoes a total colectomy for hemorrhagic colitis. When i first saw her, she could hardly stand and had a major difficulty to find her words. Seizures were happening daily. After six months of antibiotherapy, she progressed to the point that she was writing a thesis, had about no epileptic fits and could walk without hesitation. Four years along the line, she is still on treatment and maintains her progress, altough epilepsy has to be controlled by medication and fits are happening now and then. Her main problem is that lasting heavy tiredness.

Male - 25 years old.
Is admitted to hospital for pneumonia after a trip to Australia via Malaysia.
He does not recover and becomes excessively tired and unwell. After consulting many doctors, the findings of m.e. as a diagnosis is not much of a help. He reaches the point of considering suicide as the only exit. Fortunately his health condition improves dramatically under my regime of pulse antibiotherapy. But a few months later, he is rushed to hospital for hepatitis followed by a severe pneumonia. Again, he progresses rapidly under antibiotherapy. Recently he is diagnosed with an enlarged liver, the cause of this being attributed to his previous attack of hepatitis. Further investigations reveal a constrictive pericarditis showing calcification of 1 cm thick around both ventricles which will require a pericardial decortication. He stopped in Johannesburg on his way to cape town where surgery was scheduled. His attitude before this major procedure to come is that it cannot be worse than when he had m.e. As his clinical condition was the one of a fit young man, i referred him for another evaluation of his heart. The sophisticated tridimensionnal scan done in Luxemburg's proved wrong and new pressure measurements saved him from a major intervention.

Female - 35 years old.
Is first diagnosed with crohn disease fifteen years ago, followed two years later with rheumatoid arthritis. The year after, she shows the symptoms for bornholm disease. She then develops a severe fatigue preventing her from attending work, accompanied with headaches that require the daily use of morphine. On her first visit, she presented with continuous headaches, permanent backaches, bilateral hip pain and chronic diarrhea. The abdominal disturbances were the first one to subside after 2-3 months of antibiotherapy. She now suffers rarely of these debilitated headaches and her bodyaches are somehow barable.

Female - 56 years old.
Suffers from pernicious anaemia for many years starting after a tick bite fever. Four years later she is diagnosed with"discoid lupus". She comes to see me for fatigue and generalised bodyaches. She is doing well on my antibiotherapy and the treatment is discontinued after one year. A brain scan performed to investigate a persistent loss of balance reveals the onset of multiple sclerosis. Three months later, a total mammectomy is performed for cancer. She is still on antibiotics with very little results until now.

Male - 43 year old.
Farmer and polo player. at the age of 34, develops extreme fatigue and a generalised eczema for nine years, soon not responding to the administration of a growing dosage of cortisone, or to chemotherapy. No need to add that he is also given antidepressants. After six to eight months of antibiotherapy he recovered to the extend that cortisone is not necessary anymore. His skin looks healthy again.

Male - 67 years old.
Suffers from high blood pressure since the age of 52. At the age of 62, he needs a colectomy for cancer. In the last four years, he presents with a chronic uveitis while he is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and cfs. He contracts lyme disease in the united states after tick bites. The brain mri performed to investigate his headaches shows hyper-intensities in the white matter. Two years later a growth appears on the third right metacarpal, first confirmed by a radio nuclear study as part of a chronic infection (brodies abscess). Refusing the amputation of his hand, the patient goes for second opinion which confirms my diagnosis, a paget disease. This has been treated successfuly wth chemotherapy and the patient is asyptomatic.

http://chronicfatiguesyndrome.co.za/case-studies
 

Offline IAMREALITY

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #37 on: 18/06/2016 22:17:44 »
Funny... Not one of your examples contain a patient suffering from the absurd condition you through the Internet diagnosed the op with.  Now why is that I wonder? Lol

And there are misdiagnoses with any condition. That doesn't mean that thereafter every diagnosis of it therefore must be wrong.  Such conclusions are the product of ignorance and tragically flawed logic. Again, please educate yourself on the topic you're replying to.
 

Offline IAMREALITY

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #38 on: 18/06/2016 23:19:55 »
Funny... Not one of your examples contain a patient suffering from the absurd condition you through the Internet diagnosed the op with.  Now why is that I wonder? Lol

Apparently you are illiterate or you have an extra chromosome. Whichever it is....
Please point me to the case study above in which the misdiagnosed patient turned out to be suffering from hemotrophic bacteria.  K? Thx.
 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #39 on: 19/06/2016 10:34:06 »
I find it mind blowing that you think you're actually saying anything of value here. It's all malarkey. I'm not gonna give the malarkey credibility by actually having a serious discussion about it, as if it's worthy of it.  It's not.  It's just malarkey. There's no further discussion on it that needs to be had.  Like I said, educate yourself on cfs first. Actually get yourself some knowledge on it.  Maybe then we could have a discussion.

Why don't we ask chris if what I've posted is inaccurate? He is after all a medical microbiologist.
 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #40 on: 19/06/2016 12:47:53 »
And there are misdiagnoses with any condition. That doesn't mean that thereafter every diagnosis of it therefore must be wrong.  Such conclusions are the product of ignorance and tragically flawed logic. Again, your ignorance on this topic is astounding. And you've posted nothing but a bunch of malarkey, and nothing that will be helpful to the person who asked the question whatsoever.  And you continue to repeat the ridiculous assertion that cfs isn't real, when it's been proven that it is.  Proven. That means fact.

Despite the fact that the clinical diagnosis of "CFS" will always be there for the physician who can't [or won't] give their patients any more answers.... "CFS" remains factitious because the etiology of the symptoms in any of these cases can be traced to an underlying pathology.

You know what else is real about "CFS" other than the wide-scope of symptoms and interindividual variables?

There is no definite serology, histology, hematology or pathology defined for the disease.

Go ahead and Google the significance of that...


 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #41 on: 19/06/2016 23:22:29 »
Can you please tell me more about these "hemotrophic bacteria"? I'm intrigued because, as a medical microbiologist, I've never come across such an entity.

Ok I gave you a detailed response. Wouldn't hemotrophic bacteria be something you should have already known about in your profession.... or did you ask just to test my knowledge?
 

Offline IAMREALITY

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #42 on: 20/06/2016 00:02:24 »
Can you please tell me more about these "hemotrophic bacteria"? I'm intrigued because, as a medical microbiologist, I've never come across such an entity.

Ok I gave you a detailed response. Wouldn't hemotrophic bacteria be something you should have already known about in your profession.... or did you ask just to test my knowledge?

Why should he know it when there are almost zero cases of it in humans? It's just something that is so beyond rare and unlikely that I could totally understand why most in the profession wouldn't ever take it seriously.  Cause it doesn't seem to be something that is of risk to anybody, nor something that is almost ever, ever,to be a likely diagnosis. Cause again, from your own study you posted, it questioned its relevance in humans and had only one person ever believed to have actually had it.  Just one.  Out of 7 billion people. Probably not something most are gonna ever pay attention to. 
 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #43 on: 20/06/2016 01:41:18 »
from your own study you posted, it questioned its relevance in humans and had only one person ever believed to have actually had it.  Just one.  Out of 7 billion people.

rofl... This just keeps getting better with every post.

Anyone with at least an elementary-background in physiology or pharmacology would know that from the very beginning of that excerpt, it clearly states:

"the patient was infected with a novel hemoplasma species"

It then goes on to [clearly] identify 4 other species that have been documented in humans:

"Other studies have described the presence of existing veterinary hemoplasma species DNA in humans: Mycoplasma suis [7, 8], Mycoplasma haemofelis and/or Mycoplasma haemocanis [9, 10], and Mycoplasma ovis [11]."

 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #44 on: 20/06/2016 01:53:09 »
Why should he know it

Because he's a medical microbiologist and as stated in the excerpt:

"Hemotropic mycoplasmas cause not-yet-curable infections in numerous animal species, including human beings."

And that they:

"represent emerging, zoonotic pathogens that pose poorly defined health risks for animals and humans throughout the world."
 

Offline IAMREALITY

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #45 on: 20/06/2016 02:00:32 »
Why should he know it

Because he's a medical microbiologist and as stated in the excerpt:

"Hemotropic mycoplasmas cause not-yet-curable infections in numerous animal species, including human beings."

And that they:

"represent emerging, zoonotic pathogens that pose poorly defined health risks for animals and humans throughout the world."
Poorly defined risks because it barely presents in humans ever.  It's just not a relevant concern at all. When there are 7 billion people on the planet and one case study of this hemotrophic bacteria I'm pretty sure it's something no one cares about. 

The biggest clue comes from Google itself.  It's the 21st century.  Anything and everything is found on Google.  And when no research can be done on a given topic due to their literally being zero results to look at, you can be pretty sure it's a topic with no credibility.  Or there would be plenty found on it.  But the simple fact is there's nothing to be found at all (unlike the million links that show it's fact that cfs is real in both symptom and diagnosis)
 

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #46 on: 20/06/2016 02:09:59 »
I'm pretty sure it's something no one cares about.

Oh really????

Why don't you try telling Kieth Diplock that?

Or better yet.... tell his son.
 

Offline IAMREALITY

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #47 on: 20/06/2016 02:13:25 »
I'm pretty sure it's something no one cares about.

Oh really????

Why don't you try telling Kieth Diplock that?

Or better yet.... tell his son.
His son has cfs, and it would probably mean a lot more to them that someone not deny the condition doesn't even exist, since trust me, such attitudes are extremely hurtful.  Bye now. 
 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #48 on: 20/06/2016 02:19:27 »
His son has cfs

Quote from: KEITH DIPLOCK
My son has two strains of rickettsia and mycoplasma


Bye now.

buh bye
 

Offline exothermic

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Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #49 on: 20/06/2016 13:14:33 »
Why should he know it when there are almost zero cases of it in humans? It's just something that is so beyond rare and unlikely that I could totally understand why most in the profession wouldn't ever take it seriously.  Cause it doesn't seem to be something that is of risk to anybody, nor something that is almost ever, ever,to be a likely diagnosis. Cause again, from your own study you posted, it questioned its relevance in humans and had only one person ever believed to have actually had it.  Just one.  Out of 7 billion people. Probably not something most are gonna ever pay attention to.

You keep insisting the case-study I posted represents the entire species of mycoplasmas that have infected humans.... lol

Oh and before you depart, take a look at the big picture....

Do you even know what "the etiology of the symptoms in any of these cases can be traced to an underlying pathology" means????

This thread is merely one example of a person being diagnosed with "CFS" -- a disease with "no cure & no treatment".... when in actuality, every symptom he's experiencing is a direct result of an underlying pathology.

~
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Is chronic Fatigue Syndrome treatable?
« Reply #49 on: 20/06/2016 13:14:33 »

 

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