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Author Topic: can anyone advise on in-ear recording technique?  (Read 543 times)

Offline trevorjohnson32

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can anyone advise on in-ear recording technique?
« on: 15/06/2016 04:48:10 »
I recently observed several phenomena that relates to an idea I have. The human balance system, the vestibular is related to the sub-conscious and to thought noticably when you become dizzy from thinking hard.The vestibular, located in the ear, is adjacent to the cochlea in the bony labyrinth. Vibrations from the vestibular travel down to the cochlea causing a whistling in the ear. This whistling can carry messages between humans and animals and may be decipherable.

After observing a cat move its head slightly to a voluntary short tone of ear whistling, I tested it out with my mom. We both watched a timer while one of us made a voluntary tone and the other listened. After fifteen seconds the listener told the other the second the sound was attempted and it matched up 9 times out of ten! There is counter evidence that this means thoughts can be transferred this way. In a card guessing game, neither me or my mom could guess the other person's card. Whistling speech, a novel form of communication, may be perfected to communicate the card.

I also have recordings I made of the whistling in my ear. One is of involuntary activity of the whistling in my ear while I slept. I recorded it with a digital recorder and an earpiece headphone as a microphone. In the recording you can hear something like a bird chirping in conversation with short tones of white noise. This went on for about six minutes and stood out in the three hour recording. I distinctly remember having a short dream during this sleep too.

The other recording is of an attempt to manipulate the whistling in my ear into speech. The letters A-G are heard read by me at the highlighted moments, then around 22 seconds a whistling occurred in my ear from an unknown source and it can be heard reading A-C.

The sound in the recordings is so weak, and it can be clearly heard between humans when attempted properly, that this would suggest the vestibular is receiving the vibrations caused by the other person's cochlea's sound waves. That, or perhaps their is a super sensitivity in the cochlea to vibrations at that frequency.

I wonder if anyone can offer any suggestions on increasing the clarity of the recordings. Their is a lot of static and the sounds from the ear are very weak. I've come up with my own idea of using elastic, a gravity sensitive substance, as the diaphragm of a microphone placed in a vacuum that fits as an earpiece. From an electrical engineering stand point I'd say the white noise could be reduced somewhere in the amplifier but I'm not sure.


Science of the vestibular could start saving lives from suicide deaths related to schizoid and other mental disorders as soon as it is better understood and implemented.
« Last Edit: 15/06/2016 11:47:10 by Colin2B »


 

Offline Colin2B

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Re: can anyone advise on in-ear recording technique?
« Reply #1 on: 15/06/2016 12:38:05 »
You are recording what is known as subvocalisation where we 'breath'  words through our vocal chords when we are thinking, it is possible to emphasise it.
Because the sound is very sibilant and there are no plosives, the speech is very indistinct. 
The earpiece you are using won't be very efficient as a microphone and it's likely you will have an impedance mismatch with the recorder.

You could use throat mics to record the subvocalisation directly, or if you must record in-ear there are some small diaphragm condenser mics - or electret - used for lapel mics or for inside guitars, these have a very small sensor. You will need to be very careful not put it too far in and damage the eardrum. Also be aware that you will change the resonance of the ear cavity whenever you put something inside.
 

Offline RD

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Re: can anyone advise on in-ear recording technique?
« Reply #2 on: 15/06/2016 21:18:38 »
I also have recordings I made of the whistling in my ear. One is of involuntary activity of the whistling in my ear while I slept. I recorded it with a digital recorder and an earpiece headphone as a microphone. In the recording you can hear something like a bird chirping in conversation with short tones of white noise. This went on for about six minutes and stood out in the three hour recording. I distinctly remember having a short dream during this sleep too.

Digital sound recordings can include faint whistling & chirping noises which are digital artefacts : they weren't recorded by the microphone, they were generated by the recording device, e.g. ...

http://www.freesound.org/people/volivieri/sounds/37191/
http://www.freesound.org/people/MrAuralization/sounds/184569/

or the noises could be electrical interference from other devices, e.g. ...

http://www.freesound.org/people/HerbertBoland/sounds/28242/
http://www.freesound.org/people/Andy_Gardner/sounds/193716/

You may perceive whistling in your ear which be cannot be recorded ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tinnitus
« Last Edit: 15/06/2016 21:42:25 by RD »
 

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Re: can anyone advise on in-ear recording technique?
« Reply #2 on: 15/06/2016 21:18:38 »

 

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