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Author Topic: Can magnetic fields move electrons to a higher energy shell?  (Read 1055 times)

Offline Nicholas Lee

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 Is it possible for the a magnetic field to make a electron move to a higher shell level in a atom, to change the electrons electron voltage?

.. to visible light.
I need to study about magnetism a bit more, but its just a thought I had.
I also read this ' electron indeed behaves like a tiny bar magnet.
One consequence is that an external magnetic field exerts a torque on the electron magnetic moment depending on its orientation with respect to the field."
Does this mean electrons can moved to higher shells in the atom, without the
absorption of light.
If not is there any other kind of magnetic technique, or other technique that can move electrons to higher shells.
I am grateful for your help, anything helps even a few words.  :D
« Last Edit: 15/06/2016 22:36:01 by chris »


 

Offline chiralSPO

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A static magnetic field can influence electrons somewhat, but the effect is very slight. Even with some of the most powerful magnets in the world, the effects can only be noticed in special cases. For instance, some molecules will adopt a slightly different electronic structure than would be preferred in the absence of an applied magnetic field.

     no field           with field applied
   −−  −−                 −↑−  −↑−

−↑↓− −↑↓−              −↑−  −↑−

This will only effect electrons in the highest orbitals (levels), and only when the band gap is very small. The energy of the interaction of the electrons with the field must overcome the interaction of the electrons with each other and the energy of the band gap.

This is most commonly observable in molecular orbitals with substantial contribution from d and f orbitals (from transition metals or rare earth metals), where the energy levels are closely spaced, and spin-orbit coupling allows electrons to align more efficiently.


So while it is technically possible to effect the electronic structure of some select molecules and materials with a static field, one needs a very strong field to maybe have some fairly minor effects. Alternatively, one can use an alternating magnetic field, which will have a much greater influence over the electrons--but this is electromagnetic radiation (one cannot have an oscillating magnetic field without the associated oscillating electric field).
 
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Offline evan_au

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Quote from: Timemachine2
Is it possible for the a magnetic field to ... change the electrons electron voltage?
One example of this is the Zeeman Effect, which results in spectral lines splitting in a strong magnetic field.
This has been used to measure the strength of the magnetic field on the surface of the Sun.

It doesn't move an electron to an entirely different shell - it just slightly changes the energy levels within their existing shells.

It doesn't change the energy levels of the electrons enough that they become transparent to light - in fact, they now absorb more wavelengths of light; so in a sense, it makes the material slightly more opaque to light.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeeman_effect
 
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Offline evan_au

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A side discussion has been moved to "Just Chat": How did YOU get interested in science?
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=67259.0
 
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