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Author Topic: Why is the EU such an emotional topic in the UK?  (Read 359 times)

Offline Pseudoscience-is-malarkey

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Why is the EU such an emotional topic in the UK?
« on: 16/06/2016 07:53:59 »
Is it actually possible that Britain leaves the EU or does it just seem that way because the proponents of "secession" are very loud? As an island nation, Britain has had the luxury of not being invaded since 1066 (Spain came very close in 1588), and as such has a strong fabric of pride and wariness to foreign influence (the Channel Tunnel and the famous book The Battle of Dorking come to mind).


 

Offline Colin2B

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Re: Why is the EU such an emotional topic in the UK?
« Reply #1 on: 16/06/2016 13:02:25 »
... Britain has had the luxury of not being invaded since 1066
In WW2 the Channel Islands were invaded. Islanders ran a resistance, hid Jews, were deported to concentration camps. There were also stay behind army units which would have been the model for units on the mainland in case of a full scale invasion.

Exit? There is a lot of politics in the various campaigns, I suspect some have their eye on leading a faction and becoming the next PM or senior cabinet figures. Maybe I'm just cynical.

PS - Spain never came close. Out sailed and out manoeuvred by small manoeuvrable ships whose sailors knew local tides & currents and led them into tactical traps. Oh, and the weather helped - as the song goes "with God on our side"
 

Offline Pseudoscience-is-malarkey

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Re: Why is the EU such an emotional topic in the UK?
« Reply #2 on: 16/06/2016 21:41:05 »
Ah, I forgot about the Channel Islands. I also sometime forget about the Japanese invasion and occupation of Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

Anyway, I suppose it is to say that the nations with the best scientific knowledge are the ones that usually win wars!
 

Offline Jolly

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Re: Why is the EU such an emotional topic in the UK?
« Reply #3 on: 29/06/2016 15:20:01 »
Ah, I forgot about the Channel Islands. I also sometime forget about the Japanese invasion and occupation of Alaska's Aleutian Islands.


Britian has been invaded many times since 1066

 Henry Bolingbroke on 4 July 1399, landed with a small force at Ravenspur.[53] From there, he marched into the Lancastrian heartlands of Yorkshire, building his forces. At Bridlington, he was joined by the Earl of Northumberland and his son Henry Percy. The army marched southwards and on 20 July reached Leicester. Meanwhile, Richard's regent, Edmund, Duke of York had raised an army and was in Hertfordshire.The Duke of York had little desire to fight, however, and detaching himself from the army, met Henry at Berkeley Castle on 27 July.


In exile in Brittany, Henry Tudor, a distant relation of the Lancastrians, gathered a small, mainly mercenary army and mounted an invasion of Wales in 1485. Welshmen, Lancastrians, and disaffected Yorkists rallied behind Tudor, whose forces encountered Richard and the royal army at Bosworth Field on August 22. Richard was killed during the fighting, and his forces lost the battle

The pretender Perkin Warbeck made three attempts to invade England. The first, on 3 July 1495, occurred at Deal. Warbeck had arrived on a fleet of ships provided by Maximillian I. An advanced force of supporters and Flemish mercenaries was put ashore to attempt to raise local rebellion. Local forces however, defeated the landing party, killing 150 and capturing 163.[58] Warbeck himself did not land.

The second invasion came in September 1496. Warbeck had been received in Scotland in January 1496 and James IV supported him in an invasion of England later in the year. Unfortunately for the invaders, there was again no local support for Warbeck and the invaders soon returned across the border.

The third, and most successful, invasion took place in Cornwall in September 1497. In May and June 1497, there had been a revolt against Henry VII in Cornwall. This had been suppressed following the rebels' defeat at Blackheath. However, there was still sufficient dissatisfaction that when Warbeck arrived with a small force, he was accepted by many locals as Richard IV and soon raised a force of up to 8,000 rebels.[58] With this army, he besieged Exeter.

In 1688 the Dutch stadtholder William III of Orange-Nassau landed an army in Devon at the invitation of a group of Protestant nobles who were dissatisfied with what they perceived as the absolutist tendencies of the reigning Catholic King James II. After a brief campaign culminating in the Battle of Reading, William's army successfully forced James into exile in France.

There are many other examples of invasions of Britian, the Spainish did actually invade for a small time they Pillaged a few towns and decided to leave and come back with a Bigger force, but never did.
 
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Re: Why is the EU such an emotional topic in the UK?
« Reply #3 on: 29/06/2016 15:20:01 »

 

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