The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: What's your kitchen science?  (Read 398481 times)

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #100 on: 02/05/2007 21:25:56 »
what you need

video camera /mobile phone camera
remote control
dark room


what you do

take your video camera and remore control and sit in the dark room, wait afew minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark. Now your eyes have adjusted, press a button on your remote control. Do you see anything? Well, no.

Turn your video camera on. Whilst looking through the view finder, or the viewing screen on a new camera, point the remote control at your camera's lens.

what do you see?
« Last Edit: 21/05/2007 07:39:05 by paul.fr »
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #101 on: 05/05/2007 08:01:37 »
what you need

a bar of ivory soap
a microwave


what you do

place the bar of soap in your microwave and heat for two minutes. for some reason ivory soap works better than the rest, one note of caution. If you overheat the soap it will trigger your smoke alarm.

for a change i will now post what you should see:

after the two minutes, you soap should have expanded up to five times it's original size. like i said this works best with ivory soap. i have tried other soaps and it just melts and sets my smoke alarms off.

highly annoying since i did this at 7am, I'm sure the neighbours don't mind!  [:I]
 

Offline daveshorts

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2583
  • Physics, Experiments
    • View Profile
    • http://www.chaosscience.org.uk
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #102 on: 05/05/2007 08:59:32 »
It will also fill your microwave with soap flavoured smoke, and I would reccomend that you leave the door open for a while afterwards.
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #103 on: 06/05/2007 07:36:06 »
what you need

table tennis ball
bath


what you do

when you have finished bathing, take out the plug and throw the table tennis ball in to the bath.

what happens?
« Last Edit: 06/05/2007 11:56:33 by daveshorts »
 

Offline Seany

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4209
  • Live your life to the full!
    • View Profile
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #104 on: 06/05/2007 17:33:04 »
It spins? Right..?
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #105 on: 08/05/2007 14:55:41 »
what you need

a raw egg
a clear glass of hot water


what you do

Be sure to use a clear glass, so you can see what is happening. Fill the glass with hot water from your kitchen sink. We will put the egg into th water, so leave enough room so that the water does not overflow. Your main goal is to have enough hot water so that the egg will be completely under water.

Let the hot water sit for a few seconds, so that any air bubbles can float to the top. Carefully place the egg into the hot water. Watch for a minute.


What do you notice? What do you hear?


I should add a little not here, be careful when handling hot water.
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #106 on: 09/05/2007 02:31:29 »
Oh my, just short of 4,000 views! As a special treat, here is a bit of science, a trick to amase your friends and something to eat. All rolled in to one!!!


What you need


a banana with no brown spots.
some slivered almonds or other nuts
a candle holder
a lighter


what you do

Carefully peel the banana and cut a section about 3 or 4 inches long. You want it to be as straight as possible. You also want to be sure that it has no brown spots.What you are trying for is something that looks like a candle.

Once you have the length of banana, place it into the candle holder. Stick a thin sliver of almond into the top of the banana. it will only burn for a minute or so. That means you have to work quickly.

Once the candle is burning nicely, carry it carefully into the room where someone is sitting. As they watch you carrying your candle in, blow out the almond and bite some of the banana off!

there you go, the science is why the almond burned, the trick is your friends think you have just eaten a candle! and the something to eat........well, that's the banana.


One thing to be careful of is the hot end of the burned almond. It will cool quickly, but I always make sure I have plenty of saliva (spit) on my tongue to be sure it is completely out.
« Last Edit: 09/05/2007 03:26:51 by paul.fr »
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #107 on: 09/05/2007 12:48:07 »
what you need


a book of safety matches
a large coin
a lighter


what you do



tear the strickin strip off the box of matches and place it on the coin. You don't want it to hang over the edge, so you will probably have to either bend it or tear it in half.

Carefully, use the lighter to set the strip alight. When the strip has burned, carefully move it aside. On the coin, you will see a brown, oily liquid. Rub your finger across it, to get the stuff on your finger. Then rub your finger and thumb together. 


what happens?

ps, this will work best if you have plenty of light and a dark background.


As always, be careful when using matches and lighters.
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #108 on: 13/05/2007 09:43:18 »
what you need


several coins


what you do


Open your right hand and bring it up so that it is on your right shoulder, with the palm facing upwards. Start with three coins. Place them in a stack and balance them on your elbow. Now comes the fun part. You are going to sweep your hand downwards as fast as you can. Be prepared to close your hand when it runs into the coins.

Do this well away from anything glass, or easily broken.
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #109 on: 14/05/2007 10:26:11 »
It occured to me whilst reading through some of these experiments, that not all of them work! No, i'm not just posting rubbish experiments - honest.

But i have never made the lemon battery tingle my tongue, and the surface tension ones with matchsticks and washing up liquid never work for me.Why? no idea.

I previously posted an alternative surface tension experiment with food colouring, but never an alternative potato or fruit battery. battery. So here is one.

What you need


A potato
A nail or paper clip
a piece of copper wire
headphones


What you do

Stick the nail / paperclip in to the potato, about half an inch away stick the copper wire in. If you look at the plug from the headphones, you will see that the metal part is made of two or three sections. Put on the headphones. Touch one piece of metal to one section of the headphones and the other piece of metal to one of the other sections.

Listen carefully, what do you hear?

If the plug has three sections, then you may have to try touching different sections for this to work.

Did you hear anything? Why not trt repeating it with other fruits and metals to see if what you hear is in anyway different.
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #110 on: 14/05/2007 11:02:31 »
Climate change, well we have all heard of it. Maybe your kids have asked questions as to what will happen if the polar icecaps melt.

Well, the northern icecap is easy to explain in a simple experiment.
Question, what will happen to the sea level if the polar icecap melts?

what you need
a glass
water
ice cubes


what you do


Try to get a large lump of several ice cubes frozen together. You can place several ice cubes into a bowl and leave it in the freezer over night and they should freeze together. Place the ice cubes into a glass or bowl. Add enough water to fill the glass to the top. Add as much water as you can, until the glass will not hold any more without overflowing.

Now, look carefully at the glass, water and ice. There is quite a bit of ice sticking up above the glass ( the visable part of the icecap)

what will happen when the ice melts?
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #111 on: 14/05/2007 20:34:58 »
What you need


A tall glass
Ice
Fruit cordial Orange juice
Green food colouring
a straw


What you do



Fill your glass with ice. Carefully pour in the fruit cordial until the glass is a third full. Slowly pour the orange juice into the glass so it sits on the berry cordial. Then tip a little bit of food colouring in. Let the food colouring spread out into the orange juice.

If you gently push a straw into the drink down the side of the glass watch what happens to the food colouring and orange juice. You should also be able to drink one layer at a time, by gently pushing the straw down the side of the glass.

Well, the answer is slighly given away, but, what happens?
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #112 on: 14/05/2007 20:39:35 »
here is a similar one to the last, but this is just for Dads.

what you need


2 glasses
water
Whisky
a hankerchief
A straw


what you do

Put a tot of whisky in one glass and a tot of water in another. Take a clean handkerchief and lay it down the inner side of the water glass until it just touches the water. Gently pour the whisky down the handkerchief.

What happens?

Now use your straw to drink one or the other, or simply to mix things up. This works great at parties!
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #113 on: 15/05/2007 10:42:31 »
Having trouble getting the kids to brush their teeth? This experiment demostrates the way the bacteria in your mouth, release acid which destroys the enamel on your teeth!

The egg and shell bing your tooth and the enamel, and the vinegar being the acid released by the bacteria.



What you need


1 egg
1 small plastic container with a lid
Vinegar


What you do


Place the egg into the container and pour in enough vinegar to cover it. Put the lid on the container and leave it for three days.

what happens to the egg?
 

Offline kdlynn

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2851
    • View Profile
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #114 on: 16/05/2007 03:14:53 »
ok if you could all try this and let me know if the same thing happens to you, that would be great. i've done it twice. what you need: several candles the same size        what you do: freeze half of the candles. light all of them at the same time. wait and see which burns faster. the results i have gotten have had me baffled for a few days now!
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #115 on: 16/05/2007 09:33:39 »
Did you know that there is now a rss feed, for the excellent Kitchen Science section of the main Naked Scientist site? These are the experiments that are conducted on the show.

This is the url for the rss feed: http://www.thenakedscientists.com/rss/kitchen_science.xml


Alternitavley, if you use widgets / widsets on your internet enabled phone. You can download a widget from this link.
http://www.widsets.com/widgets?publicwidgetid=W2222      


If the above link does not take you to the specific widget, just type kitchen science in to the search bar.

RSS (Really Simple Syndication) provides a convenient way to syndicate information from a variety of sources, including news stories, updates to a web site or basically any type of publication. Regardless of the purpose for which the RSS file is being used, by watching this XML file, you can quickly and easily see whenever an update has occurred.

You can use the rss feed in you "home page", if you use yahoo or msn for example.




« Last Edit: 16/05/2007 19:55:13 by paul.fr »
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #116 on: 16/05/2007 09:48:15 »
What you need

two glasses
a jug or pitcher
ice cubes
water


what you do


Fill your jug with water, take one of the glasses and put 3 or 4 ice cubes in it. Wait a minute and fill the glass with water.

Take your second glass, and 1/2 fill it with water, and add the same quantity of icecubes as the first glass. If it needs more water to fill the glass, then you can add some more.

in which glass do the icecubes melt first?
 

Offline kdlynn

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2851
    • View Profile
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #117 on: 16/05/2007 09:50:52 »
that one sounds interesting
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #118 on: 16/05/2007 20:40:17 »
what you need

a few pieces of chalk
vineger
lemon juice
a saucer


what you do


Put a piece of chalk on a saucer and place 3 or 4 drops of vinegar on the chalk.

What happens?

Try a few drops of lemon juice on the chalk, now what happens?
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #119 on: 16/05/2007 21:30:13 »
This weeks podcast and radio show was about bacteria, fungi and viruses. This experiment demonstrates how you spread the common cold by sneezing.

the pump and water represent what happens when you sneeze.

What you need


Bicycle pump
Some water
A large sheet of paper
Some tape
a friend


What you do


Tape the paper up on a wall and stand back three lengths of the bicycle pump from it. Pull the pump handle of the bicycle pump back then put a couple of drops of water into the end of the bicycle pump hose. Direct the hose at the paper then push down hard on the pump handle.

what happens

to make it real, direct the pump at your friend. Make sure he / she is happy with you doing this first.
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #120 on: 17/05/2007 11:47:31 »
what you need


3 pieces of white paper
Red crayon or felt tip
Blue crayon or felt tip


what you do


Draw a red shape on one piece of white paper and a blue shape on another. Stare hard at the red shape for a few minutes then stare at the blank paper.

What happens?

 
Repeat the experiment with the blue shape.
What happens?
 
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #121 on: 18/05/2007 10:02:18 »
What you need

 
A glass of water
Lemon juice
Castor sugar
Baking soda


What you do

 
Squeeze some lemon juice into the glass of water and stir in a teaspoon of castor sugar. Taste the drink.

add a teaspoon of baking soda.
What happens? What does it taste like?
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #122 on: 18/05/2007 10:21:26 »
what you need

 
Several sheets of newspaper
Several sheets of A4 paper
An inkpad
A pen
Soap and water
Paper towels


What you do


Spread the newspaper down first and have the soap, water and paper towels nearby. Write each personís name at the top of the paper and have them put their prints onto their page one by one. Get them to wash their hands straight away!


When the prints are dry compare them and see if any of the prints are similar. Maybe some are Whorl patterns, maybe some are loops and some might be arch patterns.


Have them make another set of prints on paper without their name on top and see if you can match their new set with the named set.

If you have brothers or sister, try doing this with them. If you have a twin, what will your results be?

topic link

What causes "fingerprints", and why do we all have different ones? http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=6371.0
« Last Edit: 21/05/2007 07:38:19 by paul.fr »
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #123 on: 20/05/2007 21:30:55 »
what you need


Jelly
a ladel, or large spoon
glass or clear plate


what you do


Make you jelly. Before letting it set, fill your ladel with the jelly and pop it in to your fridge. After about 3 - 4 hours it should be set.

remove the jelly from the ladel mould, if the jelly does not come out with ease, run hot water over the back of the ladel to free it.

Now, set your jelly mould in the centre of your glass plate. Place the plate on top of a newspaper or book.

what happens?

topic link

"magnifying Glass" http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=7776.0
« Last Edit: 21/05/2007 07:33:17 by paul.fr »
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #124 on: 20/05/2007 21:42:37 »
what you need

Scissors
a balloon
an empty  2 litre drink bottle, with lid on


what you do

Use the scissors to cut the top off your drink bottle, cut about 2 inches below the lid. Poke a small hole in the bottle lid, then inflate your balloon.

with the neck of the balloon, tightly pinched. Stretch the mouth of the ballooon over the bottle lid, now let go of your grip on the balloon.

what happens?


oops, forgot to mention. do this on either a tabletop or non-carpeted floor.

topic link

"Eactly how does a hover craft work ?" http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=6951.msg73102#msg73102
« Last Edit: 21/05/2007 07:34:35 by paul.fr »
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #124 on: 20/05/2007 21:42:37 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums