The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: What's your kitchen science?  (Read 398054 times)

Offline Batroost

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 276
  • There's no such thing as a dirty atom!
    • View Profile
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #150 on: 15/06/2007 21:43:28 »
How to keep a balloon inflated with nothing sealing the end...!

What you need
A plastic bottle
A balloon

What you do
Make a small hole near the bottom of the bottle with something sharp. Put the body of the balloon in the bottle with the end opened around the bottle's neck.
Now blow into the balloon, inflating it inside the bottle - air will blow out of the hole. Before you take your mouth away from the balloon, cover the hole in the bottle with your finger.

 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #151 on: 16/06/2007 23:47:57 »
Great experiments, Batroost. I hope you continue to contribute to this topic.

What you need


Celery
Food colouring
A petri dish, or small clear glass


what you do


Cut a piece of celery, like this:



use a short piece of celery with the leaves still on and place it in a few centimetres of food colouring in water. Leave it for a day or so then carefully cut into the celery long ways to see where the colour has reached.

What does the celery look like now?

Don't forget, there are more experiments to be found on the main website: http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/content/kitchenscience/

Over at Chaos: http://www.chaosscience.org.uk/pub/public_html/index.php

or via the rss feed: http://www.thenakedscientists.com/rss/kitchen_science.xml
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #152 on: 18/06/2007 08:43:03 »
what yo need

paper


what you do

well, this weekends "experiment" is folding paper. I'm sure you have all heard that it is impossible to fold paper 10 times. Well what you need to do this weeken is just that, fold a piece of paper in half, and in half again, and so on for a total of 10 times.

This has been done, in 2001 by a school girl! Can you get anywhere near her record? I will post the answer as to how she accomplished this on Monday, have a happy paper folding weekend.

Edit: I should add that the record she achieved was 12 folds!

Well, here is how Britney Gallivan (of Pomona, California) solved the problem.

The first solution was for the classical fold-it-this-way, fold-it-that-way method of folding the paper. Here you fold the paper in alternate directions. She derived a formula relating the number of folds possible (n) to the width (w, of the square sheet you start with) and the material's thickness (t):



The second solution was for folding the paper in a single direction. This is the case when you try to fold a long narrow sheet of paper. She derived another formula relating the number of folds possible in one direction (n) to the minimum possible length of material (l) and the material's thickness (t):



When she looked closely, she found that if you are trying to fold the sheet as many times as possible, there are advantages in using a long narrow sheet of paper.

Her formula told her that to successfully fold paper 12 times, she would need about 1.2 km of paper.

After some searching she found a roll of special toilet paper that would suit her needs - and that cost US $85. In January 2002, she went to the local shopping mall in Pomona. With her parents, she rolled out the jumbo toilet paper, marked the halfway point, and folded it the first time. It took a while, because it was a long way to the end of the paper. Then she folded the paper the second time, and then again and again.

After seven hours, she folded her paper for the 11th time into a skinny slab, about 80 cm wide and 40 cm high, and posed for photos. She then folded it another time (to get that 12th fold essential for her extra maths credit), and wrote up her achievement for the Historical Society of Pomona in her 40 page pamphlet, "How to Fold Paper in Half Twelve Times: An "Impossible Challenge" Solved and Explained". She wrote in her pamphlet, "The world was a great place when I made the twelfth fold."
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #153 on: 18/06/2007 18:21:30 »
This weeks radio show was about Forensic Science, in light of that. Here is an experiment involving chromatography.

what you need


paper towel
scissors
a jar
felt-tipped pens and markers
two paper clips
water.


what you do


Cut some absorbent paper (such as paper towel) into strips about 2 cm wide. The length isn't really important and will depend on the size of the jar you hang them in.

Draw a small circle 1 cm from the bottom of the paper with different black markers or felt-tipped pens.
Fill a clean jar with about 1 cm of water and carefully place the paper into the jar making sure that the bottom of the paper is in the water. The circle must be ABOVE the water level. Use paper clips to hold the paper upright in the jar. Watch the water rise up the paper.

After a few minutes remove the paper from the jar. Notice how different colours in the ink travel up the paper at different speeds.

Now try some different colour pens and markers. Can you see any differences?

Did you have any pens for which the ink did not separate? If so, repeat the experiment using methylated spirits instead of water in the jar. Try out a variety of pens. Can you see any differences? 

The method used to compare inks is called chromatography. It involves separating the ink in each of the pens. As the solvent (water) rises up the paper, the different colours of the ink separate.

Ask your family to play your suspects. Have them use specific pens for the job and see if you can figure out which ink comes from which pen and nab the criminals in your family...tip: It's always the little sister  ;)
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #154 on: 19/06/2007 11:46:43 »
what you need


A pan or bowl that has a flat bottom
a candle
water
a lighter
a glass jar, jam jar type
a large glass bottle


what you do



Start by lighting the candle and letting some of the melted wax drip onto the
center of the pan. Quickly set the base of the candle into the liquid wax,
so the candle will stay in place. Add about an inch of water to the pan.

Turn the glass jar upside down, so that the opening is at the bottom. Place
the jar over the candle and set it down into the water.

Watch what happens after the candle goes out. Now repeat, this time with the large glass bottle.
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #155 on: 20/06/2007 10:39:49 »
what you need


4 white posterboards or pieces of paper 
Bright red, green, and blue construction or contact paper
Small piece of black construction or contact paper, or black marking pen
Scissors
Glue or glue stick (if you are using construction paper)


what you do


Cut the same simple shape, such a bird or a fish, from each of the three colored papers. Glue each shape on its own white board. Leave one white board blank. Cut a small black eye for each bird or fish or draw one in with the marking pen. If you choose a bird as the shape, draw the outline of a birdcage on the blank board; if you choose a fish, draw a fishbowl, etc.

Place the boards in a well-lit area.

Stare at the eye of the red bird for 15 to 20 seconds and then quickly stare at the birdcage. You should see a bluish-green (cyan) bird in the cage. Now repeat the process, staring at the green bird. You should see a reddish-blue (magenta) bird in the cage. Finally, stare at the blue bird.

What colour is the bird now?
 

Offline Batroost

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 276
  • There's no such thing as a dirty atom!
    • View Profile
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #156 on: 20/06/2007 19:21:23 »
How to make a messy (but simple) rocket...

What you need

A lemonade bottle
Water
Vinegar
Bicarbonate of soda or baking powder
Some cardboard (maybe)
A cork that fits reasonably tightly into the neck of the bottle


What you do


Make a cardboard nosecone and fins for the lemonade bottle rocket (not compulsory!).
Fill the bottle to around the half way point with water and vinegar - I've used about a 10:1 water:vinegar mix. The next bit you have to do very quickly.... tip in two or three generous spoonfulls of bicarbonate of soda, push the cork in and upend the bottle so that the neck points downards. Run away...

The bicarb. will react with the acidic water to produce carbon-dioxide. This will bubble to the top of the bottle, increasing the pressure inside until the cork is forced out. Then the pressure of the gas pushes the water out (down) and Newton's law of action-reaction lifts the rocket into the air.

Like so...



This rocket flew three times before being retired. I got covered in water/vinegar and bicarb. - so it's a good idea to have a pair of goggles to protect your eyes.


 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #157 on: 21/06/2007 02:05:35 »
what you need


A clear plastic bottle or jar with a tight-fitting srcew on lid
Liquid hand soap that has glycol stearate in it
Water
Food coloring
Clear tape


what you do


Fill the bottle or jar about 1/4 full with liquid soap. Add a drop or two of food coloring. The coloring will make the swirls easier to see.

Turn on your tap so you have just a trickle of water. Use that to fill up the rest of the bottle. (If you run the water too hard, you'll get foam.) Make sure that the water fills the bottle all the way to the very top.
 

Screw the cap on the bottle. Turn the bottle upside-down a few times to mix the soap and water. If you get foam, take the cap off and trickle some more water into the bottle. The foam will run over the edge. Recap the bottle tightly.

Dry the bottle and the cap, then wrap clear tape around it so the bottle won't leak.
 

Twirl the bottle slowly. What do you see? What happens when you stop twirling the bottle? What happens if you spin it quickly?

Try shaking the bottle up and down or side to side. What different patterns do you see inside the bottle?
 
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #158 on: 22/06/2007 12:18:00 »
what you need


A glass jar or clear drinking glass
Vegetable oil
Salt
Water
Food coloring


what you do


Pour about 3 inches of water into the jar then about 1/3 cup of vegetable oil. When everything settles, is the oil on top of the water or underneath it?
 
add one drop of food coloring to the jar.

Shake salt on top of the oil while you count slowly to 5. Wow! What happens to the food coloring? What happens to the salt?

Add more salt to keep the action going for as long as you want.

This is similar to a kitchen Science Experiment conducted by Dave on the radio show, here is a link: http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/content/kitchenscience/exp/build-a-lava-lamp/


 
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #159 on: 25/06/2007 16:56:17 »
4th of July Celebrations

what you need


Box of Epsom Salts
Colorful pipe cleaners
Straight-sided, container that can hold about 2 cups liquid
Old pencil or stick long enough to go over the container
time


what you do

While stirring a cup of boiling water, slowly pour in Epsom Salts, adding about 1/4 cup at a time. It will hold quite a lot. As soon as the solution won't turn clear with stirring, it is time to stop.

Take one or two pretty, colorful pipe cleaners. Bend it into some holiday shape at one end, leaving the other for a "hanger." Hang it over a pencil suspended over a STRAIGHT SIDED container, or you won't be able to get your crystal out. (I learned this one the hard way, obviously.) Pour the Epsom Salt solution over the pipe cleaner in the container. Set it in the warmest room in your home where it won't be disturbed.

In about 3 weeks, the water will have evaporated, leaving long, lovely crystals behind on the pipe cleaner, just in time to hang up as an ornament.

Ok, they may not be ready by then. But still worth doing.

 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #160 on: 25/06/2007 16:59:46 »
what you need

One to keep the kids entertained on a gloomy, rainy day...like today.


2 tablespoons (10ml) soap powder or scrapings (not a detergent)
1/4 cup (60ml) hot water
1 tablespoon (5ml) turpentine
spoon


what you do


In a bowl dissolve the soap powder in hot water. Add the turpentine then pour into a small screw top jar.
Brush over a picture like from those from a comic book or magazine. Wait about 10 seconds and place a sheet of paper over it. Rub the back with a spoon. The picture can be transferred to t-shirts, paper, etc. and can usually be transferred more than once.

Obviously, the kids will need to be supervised when handling turpentine
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #161 on: 27/06/2007 18:20:03 »
an early posted wekend activity for the kids, making clay models.

what you need


1 cup rolled oats
2/3 cup flour
1/2 cup water
large bowl

what you do


Mix all of the ingredients in a large bowl.  Add more flour if necessary for the dough to form a lump. knead the dough on a floured surface until it is smooth. You can add food coloring to the water before mixing the dough, or divide it into balls and add the coloring afterwards.

make something!

air dry overnight.

 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #162 on: 29/06/2007 15:52:06 »
what you need


scissors
an index card, or piece of card 3" x 5"


what you do


Fold the file card in half lengthwise and make 13 partial cuts widthwise. First cut through the folded side, then turn the card around and cut toward the fold. Keep repeating the process. (Cut to within a quarter inch of the edges of the card.)

Very carefully open the card and cut lengthwise along the fold. Do not cut the two end sections.

Gently stretch the card as far as it will go and put it over your head.
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #163 on: 01/07/2007 15:25:54 »
what you need


12-inch ruler
Several sheets of paper newspaper.
Table


what you do


Lay a 12-inch ruler on the edge of a table so that about a third of the ruler extends over the edge. Place several large sheets of newspaper, over the ruler. Hit the ruler sharply.

What happens? Why?
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #164 on: 03/07/2007 07:32:35 »
what you need


a few different shells
vinegar
an old, empty jar
coarse sandpaper.


what you do


Half fill a jar with vinegar and place a shell in it. Leave it for a day. Before you fish it out, can you see any bubbles coming from it?

Once it is out, examine the shell to see how it has changed.

Using a different shell, rub one side of it against the sandpaper. It's easiest if you place the sandpaper on a hard, flat surface.

Gradually the shell will wear down, layer by layer, revealing the inner structure.

 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #165 on: 23/07/2007 20:23:13 »
A variation on a previous post.

What you need

Bowl of cold water
Coin (bigger than the bottle opening)
Glass Bottle (with a small opening/mouth, something like a coke bottle)


what you do


Fill a bowl with some cold water. Place the bottle neck and coin in the bowl of water to chill them.  This helps to make an airtight seal when you place the coin on the top of the bottle.

After a few minutes, remove the bottle and coin. Then place the coin on the top of the bottle, wrap your hands around the bottle and wait for several seconds.

What happens to the coin?

Remove your hands from the bottle and wait.


What happens to the coin now?
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #166 on: 23/07/2007 20:44:02 »
what you need


a long glass jar, like olives come in
water
Paper and a pen


what you do


Wash the jar and remove the label. Fill a large bowl or dish pan with water. Place the jar under the water and turn it so all the air comes out. Still under water, put the lid on the jar.
When you remove it from the water, there should not be any air bubbles inside. Dry the outside of the jar.

Print the following words on a sheet of paper. Print them neatly, just as
they are here. You can always type the words, and print them with your printer.

HIDE MY BIKE

Place the jar over the words, with the side of the jar touching the paper. Reading through the jar, what do you see? You see the same words, maybe a bit bigger depending on your jar, but otherwise just the same.

Lift the jar a couple of inches off the paper, and read the words through the jar again.

What happened to the words?
« Last Edit: 23/07/2007 20:57:03 by paul.fr »
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #167 on: 24/07/2007 15:22:28 »
what you need


Oil
Sink
Funnel
Vinegar
Paper towels
Blue food coloring
1/2 cup, measuring cup
Small, clear plastic drinking bottle with screw lid


What you do


Remove the top from the clear plastic bottle (keep the lid), and pour out half a cup vinegar into the measuring cup. Add a couple of drops of the blue food colouring into the vinegar.

Place the funnel in the mouth of the bottle and pour the vinegar mixture into the bottle, Swish the bottle around a bit so that the blue food colouring mixes with the vinegar.

Pour out half a cup oil into the measuring cup, place the funnel into the mouth of the bottle and pour the oil into the bottle.

Remove the funnel and screw the lid back onto the bottle (making sure that the lid is secured properly so that there is no leaking). Shake the mixture.

What happens?

Let the mixture sit for a few minutes, and keep watching it.

What happens?

Take the lid off and tip the bottle to pour out a bit of the mixture into the sink. What happens? The oil comes out and the vinegar stays to the bottom of the bottle.

Place your index finger over the top of the bottle and turn it upside down over the sink very slowly, keeping your finger in place.

Now uncover a bit of the opening of the lid and let a little bit of the solution drip out.

What happens this time?

 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #168 on: 25/07/2007 20:53:47 »
Not very sciency, but Anastasia enjoyed doing this and it passes some time for bored kids in the holidays.

What you need

Fallen leaf or leaves
Ribbon (about 25cm)
Transparent plastic bag
Permanent ink marker
Small basin
paper towels
Food colouring
Paper punch
Stiff paint brush
Household bleach


What you do


Clean the leaf thoroughly to remove dirt. Soak it in a strong solution of bleach till it turns white. Caution: Strong household bleach is corrosive. Please avoid direct contact with your fingers or skin.
 
Rinse the leaf and gently remove the soft tissue with a paint brush.
 
Rinse and blot dry between paper towels.
 
Pour the food colouring of your choice into a small basin. Dip the leaf skeleton in it. Remove and dry between paper towels.
 
Insert the dyed leaf skeleton into the transparent plastic bag. Use a paper punch to make a hole on the unsealed side of the bag.
 
Put a ribbon through the hole and secure neatly. Label the leaf by writing its common or scientific name on the plastic bag with a marker.
 
And there you have it, you very own unique "leafmark"!

As stated above, do be careful when using household bleach
 
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #169 on: 26/07/2007 11:37:31 »
what you need


Plastic bottle
Baking soda
Vinegar
Drinking straw
Plasticine
Scissors.


what you do


With a pair of scissors, make a small hole in the bottom of the plastic bottle, close to the edge.
 
Push the plastic straw through the hole until only about 1cm sticks out. Press the straw down a little. Press plasticine round it to keep the straw in place and seal up the hole.
 
Shake some baking soda onto a paper tissue or piece of paper. Wrap the paper round the baking soda and twist the ends, like a sweet.
 
Pour some vinegar into the bottle. Push in the paper with the baking soda wrapped inside(through the bottle top). Put the cover of the bottle on as quickly as you can. Put the bottle gently into a bath of water and let go.
 

What happens?
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #170 on: 27/07/2007 18:35:43 »
Ooh, nearly 20,000 views.

what you need

Bucket
Glass bottle
Hammer
Nail
Needle
straw
Plasticine
Food Colouring


what you do


Half fill the bottle with cold water and add food colouring to colour the water then crew the lid on tightly.
 
Using a hammer and a nail, carefully make a hole in the lid of the bottle. The hole must be big enough for the straw to fit in.
 
Push the straw into the hole until it is below the water level. Use the plasticine to seal around the hole of the bottle and the hole of the straw. Make another smaller hole at the top of the straw with a needle.
 
Fill the bucket with hot water and put the bottle in the bucket. What a while...

What happens?
 
Use caution with the hot water and the hammer
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #171 on: 01/08/2007 15:25:41 »
what you need


Small rubber ball
Flat table top surface
Medium size jar with a wide mouth

what you do


Place the ball on top of the table and put the jar over the ball so that the ball is inside the mouth of the jar.

Start spinning the jar around in a circular motion (keeping it on the table).

Once the ball starts spinning inside the jar lift it from the table top.

What happens?
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #172 on: 06/08/2007 21:55:26 »
what you nedd

Two beakers
Muddy water
A strip of cloth


what you do

Fill one of the beakers with the muddy water, and leave the other empty. Place the strip of cloth so one end is in each beaker.
Leave, undisturbed overnight.

What happens?




 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #173 on: 06/08/2007 22:07:44 »
Just a reminder that there is an rss feed, for the excellent Kitchen Science section of the main Naked Scientist site? These are the experiments that are conducted on the show.

This is the url for the rss feed: http://www.thenakedscientists.com/rss/kitchen_science.xml


Alternitavley, if you use widgets / widsets on your internet enabled phone. Like the hundreds of other users, you can download a widget from this link.
http://www.widsets.com/widgets?publicwidgetid=W2222      


If the above link does not take you to the specific widget, just type kitchen science in to the search bar.

RSS (Really Simple Syndication) provides a convenient way to syndicate information from a variety of sources, including news stories, updates to a web site or basically any type of publication. Regardless of the purpose for which the RSS file is being used, by watching this XML file, you can quickly and easily see whenever an update has occurred.

You can use the rss feed in you "home page", if you use yahoo or msn for example.

Don't forget to visit the Main kitchen Science Section, on the Naked Scientist, for the latest experiments from the show.
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/content/kitchenscience/





 

paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #174 on: 08/08/2007 00:25:51 »
Make you own "bath bombs"

what you need

2 cups of baking soda
1 cup of cornstarch
1 cup of citric acid
A large and a small mixing bowl
and a few drops of food coloring


what you do


Place all of the ingrediants in a large bowland mix well, scoop out 1 cup into a small bowl and add the coloring.

Mix well again, then add this back to the large bowl and mix well....

Remove enough mixture to the small bowl for one bomb and mist lightly with a spritz bottle, just enough to hold salts together. DON"T over mist , this is where technique comes in . Press the moisten mixture into a mold,pack down hard. Continue on in the same way. If your molded bombs break , just moisten and remold. If you have added to much water just add more dry ingredients to stop the fizzing.

Carefully remove the bomb from the mold and let dry out overnight. You can use anything to make your mould, ice cube trays old containers...anything.

Note: If you want fragrant bath bombs, just add 30 to 40 drops of a fragrant oil at the initial mixing stage.



 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #174 on: 08/08/2007 00:25:51 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums