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Author Topic: What's your kitchen science?  (Read 398411 times)

Offline i am bored

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #175 on: 09/08/2007 02:16:39 »
speaking of bombs can you take a look at this for me http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=9348.msg113569#new
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #176 on: 11/08/2007 15:29:13 »
what you need


blu-tack
string
sun glasses
a window


what you do

Roll 2 small balls with the blu-tack, about 1cm in diameter. Stick one of the balls on each end of your string, and attach one of them to the middle, top of the window frame.

You should now have a length of string, hanging from the window frame with a ball of blu-tack on the other end.

Set the string swinging from side to side. Retreat to the other side of the room, and put your sunglasses on.

With your sunglasses on, and the string swinging from side to side. Close your left eye whilst looking at the ball of blu-tack swinging on the string.

what happens?

Now close your right eye, looking with your left.

What happens?
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #177 on: 12/08/2007 12:22:09 »
Make the bst bubbles, for blowing.

What you need

Sugar
washing up liquid
Hand / shower gel (must contain glycerin, check label for ingredients)

What you do


Dissolve the three tablespoons of white sugar in 100ml of hot water, and stir well. Stir in a desert spoon of washing up liquid. Then stir in a tablespoon of clear hand gel.

Go blow bubbles.
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #178 on: 12/08/2007 12:22:16 »
what you need


A smarties type tube
A sharp pencil
blu-tack
String
Scissors
A ruler
Tissue paper
Some of the bubble mixture from the previous post.


What you do

Seperate the layers of tissue paper, and cut a thin strip off one layer about 2cm wdie. Tie one end of the string to the top of your srtip of tissue paper.

Affix the blu-tack to the other end of the string and hang it from a shelf or window frame. You now have the strip of tissue paper suspended from the string.

With the pencil, make a hole in the end of the smarties tube. The hole should be only about 0.5cm wide.

Put the open end of the tube in your bubble mix, and give it a gentle stir. Gently blow through the end you poked a hole in to make a bubble, do not blow too hard, you want the bubble to remain on the end of the tube.

Put the end of your tube with the small hole in it close to the hanging tissue paper.

what happens?
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #179 on: 14/08/2007 16:03:19 »
what you need

2 ice bube trays
water
a freezer


what you do


Get both ice trays and fill one with tap water, and the other with boiled water. Put them both in the freezer and let them freeze.

what happens?
 

Offline neilep

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #180 on: 14/08/2007 19:21:47 »
What You Need

Participatory Members !!



What You Do


Try to add to this fantastic thread as much as you can with your own kitchen science experiments and fun things to do !!
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #181 on: 15/08/2007 13:39:51 »
what you need


A jam jar
blue mouthwash
olive oil


what you do


pour enough mouthwash to fill the jar to a depth of 5cm, then pour in a layer of olive oil to a depth of 0.5cm. Replace the lid and shake the jar.

Both substances should now mixed.

Hold the jar up to a strong light, what do you notice about the liquid?

Edit: if you don't have blue mouthwash, you can use water with atleast 3 drops of blue food colouring in at, as a substitute.
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #182 on: 18/08/2007 15:48:15 »
what you need

your nose
a hand


what you do


beigin humming, then suddenly pinch your nostrils together.

what happens?
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #183 on: 20/08/2007 00:58:14 »
Wow.. Cool pinch first and try to hum! Very weird.. I have never noticed that before! LOL
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #184 on: 20/08/2007 16:13:26 »
what you need

3 bowls
water
watch / clock


what you do

Fill the three bowls, one with hot water from the tap, one with cold water and the other with tepid water.

put one hand in the cold water and the other in the hot water, leave them there  for 45 seconds and remove. Your hand may ache in the cold water but it will do no harm.

Now put both hand in to the tepid water, what do you notice about the temperature of your hands?

Where i state to use hot water from the tap, this should not be red hot. Just to a degree of "hotness" (is that a word) that is comfortable

This was also done on the show http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/content/kitchenscience/exp/how-to-fool-your-senses/ [dave]
« Last Edit: 08/10/2007 11:35:09 by daveshorts »
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #185 on: 22/08/2007 19:25:33 »
what you need

a piece of shiny, metallic card
scissors


what you do


cut a piece of the card 30cm long and 9 cm high, and cut a semi-circle out in the middle. this is where the card will sit on your nose.

sit the card on your nose, with the shiney side facing your eyes. Now bend both ends of the card slightly away from your face.

what happens?

if you don't have shiny metallic card you could always use ordinary card and stick kitchen foil on to it.

 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #186 on: 27/08/2007 13:53:12 »
A variation of how we used to play naughts and crosses at school, paper was expensive back then!

what you need


your arm
a finger nail


what you do


scratch a word on the underside of your forearm with your finger nail, but don't break your skin. In a few moments the word will appear in the form of white marks.

Now rub the area of your skin where the word is.
what happens?
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #187 on: 27/08/2007 14:00:22 »
what you need


a darkened room with white or light coloured walls.
a small, bright torch


what you do


stand about 2 foot from the wall, and face it. with the torch at just below the level of your chin and just beyond the end of your nose, turn the torch on. The beam should be slightly turned twoards your eyes not shone directly in to your eyes. Wait a few seconds, what do you notice? what are you seeing?
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #188 on: 02/09/2007 05:59:33 »
what you need

a large lid, or circular disc
pencil
paint
large sheet of white paper
blu-tack


what you do

Draw around the lid to make two circles, side by side. Paint one circle a dark colour and the other a light colour. Allow it to dry and hang the paper on a wall with the blu-tack.

Stand a few feet back, and look at both circle.

What happens?
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #189 on: 05/09/2007 10:01:10 »
Experiments showing a simple flow and return circulation driven by gravity, yet powerful enough to raise water effortlessly to great heights.

What you need

Some salt, sugar, food colouring, plastic tube 4 metres, (type used to oxygenate fish tanks) T connector to join tubes, Syringe body (without needle end) to inject salt solution (can be scrounged from local vet or doctor) tray to catch water, clear vase or tall glass,  two clear glass small bottles, a little stiff wire or some tape to hold the tubes in the two bottles,

What to do:

Is shown in the video, so watch the video for further instructions
I will be posting the experiment results showing the desired effect but it would be cool if you could have a go yourselves and report the results here. Once your experiment is ready to go, elevate the centre of the tube which has the syringe body filled with coloured saline sollution attached and observe what happens.

Andrew



In this short video there is an example of water exuding from an open ended U tube showing precisely how water exudes from a cut stem. When viewing the part about spirit levels and while observing the level differences between the tube, picture a pair of scissors cutting through both tubes as would be the case in a tree or plant. What would happen to the water levels?

Andrew
« Last Edit: 05/09/2007 10:04:05 by Andrew K Fletcher »
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #190 on: 09/09/2007 12:22:06 »
what you need

a potatoe
a strong straw


what you do

Hold the straw firmly but without crushing or bending it. Hold the potato in the fingertips of your other hand, take aim and stab the potato with the straw as hard as you can!

what happened?

if nothing happened, or the straw just bent, then you were possibly a bit nervous, just pretend the straw is as rigid as a pencil and stab the potato harder.

for added safety, you may want to wear a gardening type glove on the hand that is holding the potatoe
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #191 on: 16/09/2007 09:43:55 »
what you need

A football (or basketball)
A tennis ball


what you do


with the football held out straigh in your hands, drop the ball and see how high it bounces. Now repeat with the tennis ball. Note that how how they bounce when dropped individually.

Now hold the two balls so that the tennis ball one is resting and centred on top of the football, rop the two balls drop simultaneously.

what happens?
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #192 on: 21/09/2007 14:53:29 »
what you need

A straw
A pair of scissors


what you do


cut a point in the end of a straw, so itís shaped like a flat pencil and flatten it out between your teeth. put the flattened pointy end in your mouth, press down with your lips and blow. you should get a buzzy trumpet sound.

Take a big breath and gently blow down the straw, as you blow cut bits off the end of the straw.

What happens to the "tune"?
 

Offline neilep

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #193 on: 30/09/2007 21:21:51 »


What you need !

One arm !


What you do !


Press the whole arm against the wall for a minute then walk away.

What happens ?


Ewe can try this with a leg too !!...preferably your own !!
 

Offline techmind

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #194 on: 05/10/2007 00:06:39 »
what you need

An empty 500ml soft-drink bottle
Kettle + boiling water  (need supervision for youngsters)

what you do

Stand the empty bottle (with the lid removed) upright in a sink.

Boil the kettle. Pour the boiling water into the neck of the bottle.
The water needs to be very hot, so start pouring as soon as the kettle has switched itself off.
You need to be careful when you start to pour the water that you don't topple the bottle over. It's also slightly harder than you might imagine, as you will find out. See if you can fill the bottle completely.


It works with some mineral water bottles, and some clear washing-up bottles too (basically any PET-type plastic bottles).

CAUTION: don't pick up the bottle too soon - it will remain hot!
If you're impatient, when you're done knock the bottle over with a spoon, let it empty down the sink, and splash with cold water :-)
« Last Edit: 05/10/2007 00:13:35 by techmind »
 

Offline techmind

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #195 on: 05/10/2007 00:26:55 »
Related to the above... (but different outcome)

what you need

An old/expired/unwanted "credit card"-type plastic card.
Kettle + boiling water  (need supervision for youngsters)
A large mug, or soup-bowl
A desert-spoon

You can use any similar plastic card such as a cashpoint/debit card, an AA membership card, or a mobile-phone top-up card. It should be the type of card that has raised lettering.
You will not be able to use the card after this experiment, so please use an unwanted card!!!


what you do

Put the plastic card into the mug or bowl.

Boil the kettle.

Pour the boiling water over the plastic card.
The water needs to be fairly hot, so start pouring as soon as the kettle has switched itself off.

Fish out the plastic card using the spoon. Oooohhhhh!


Repeat until bored!

Note it stops working as the water cools, so you may need to boil some more water :-)
I guess you could also do this experiment in a small saucepan on the hob.


P.S. I discovered this myself one evening when I had a small stash of cards to get rid of...
« Last Edit: 05/10/2007 14:49:04 by techmind »
 

Offline techmind

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #196 on: 05/10/2007 01:01:09 »
What you need

Small portable AM medium-wave / long-wave radio
Digital electronic gadgets (suggest TV remote control, MP3 player, digital watch or alarm clock)

What you do

Switch on the radio, and set it to MEDIUM WAVE or LONG WAVE.
This experiment will not work on VHF/FM.

Tune the radio to a quiet spot between any stations.
If you hear a lot of loud and nasty buzzes and whistles then ensure the radio is moved well away from any computers/consoles, and that nearby fluorescent lights and "energy-saver" lightbulbs are switched off.
Turn up the radio volume to maximum.
You may hear a little bit of hiss and some crackles or some feint whistles or foreign stations. That's okay. It's best to find the quietest position of the tuning that you can, however. The internal ferrite rod aerial is directional, so you can also try rotating the radio to make the background as quiet as possible.

Now place your TV remote control very close to the radio. Press a button on the remote.
Did it make you jump??!!
Now try pressing different buttons on the remote.

Now try placing other digital gadgets close to the radio, e.g. a (plastic-cased) digital watch, alarm clock, or an MP3 player.
You might find the effect is rather quieter (especially with the digital watch), so you may have to move the test-item around the case of the radio to find the most sensitive spot (which will be somewhere near the ferrite rod aerial inside).

With the watch or clock, you might find the sound changes as the seconds tick over.
With the MP3 player try playing a song, and skipping forwards or backwards tracks while listening to the radio.


Now for the really clever bit: place a mobile phone close to the radio. Start with the phone completely switched off, then switch it on while it's very close to the radio. After it's all settled down, try making a brief phone call (maybe to your balence enquiry/voicemail/or other free info service). Hang up. Again after it's settled down, try switching off the phone completely. There will probably be a mixture of very loud and much quieter subtle effects. You may have heard the loud ones in the past (you even get the loud ones on VHF/FM radios). Listen carefully even when the phone is switched on but apparently doing nothing (you may need to slowly and carefully move the phone around the case of the radio to find the best spot to hear this).
[I can explain what some of these are in a future posting]

This can be even more interesting to do if you're travelling longer distances (not driving) in a car or train and have a radio and phone with you. (It won't work with the car radio - you need a small portable/personal radio; earphones are fine). You don't need to make any calls - just leave the phone switched on and held next to the radio. You may have heard the loud sound on the FM band before too - but you need the medium/long wave band to hear some of the more subtle stuff. See what happens when you go into a tunnel or an area with poor mobile reception...


The radio is like a stethoscope diagnosis-tool for digital gadgets!
« Last Edit: 05/10/2007 01:22:51 by techmind »
 

Offline techmind

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #197 on: 05/10/2007 14:22:19 »
What you need

LCD computer screen (to use as a light source)
Polaroid / polarizing sunglasses
Some clear plastic objects - the lid of a CD case works very well. If you're careful then your CD case won't get damaged, but it might be safer to use one you don't care about too much.
Some Sellotape (transparent self-adhesive tape, Scotch tape etc)

This experiment will ONLY work with LCD screens. It won't work with older cathode ray tube screens. Sorry.
As this experiment probes effects of polarised light, it will only work with polarising sunglasses.


What you do

It's not essential, but you may need to dim the lights in the room a bit for best effect.

You need a mostly-white screen on the computer, so fire up a Notepad or Wordpad (or equivalent program) and maximise them to full screen so you have a good uninterrupted expanse of white.


Part 1

Put on the sunglasses. You will probably find that the room gets a bit darker, but the screen doesn't get much dimmer. Now turn your head on its side. What happens?
You might find it easier to take the sunglasses off and rotate them in front of your eyes instead.
If nothing much happens then probably the sunglasses aren't polarizing. Try and find another pair.


Part 2

Adjust the angle of the sunglasses to make the screen darkest.
Now hold the lid of your CD case in front of the screen. Wow!

Try with a plastic lunchbox, plastic packaging, plastic ruler, plastic business-card box, etc


Part 3

Cut or tear some strips of sellotape and stick them randomly on the lid of the CD case so they are criss-crossing each other.
Have another look in front of the LCD screen with the sunglasses.
You could even make specially cut pieces of sellotape to make a picture (you might find that other plastics - like overhead projector transparency - give a better plain dark background).
You could also try just sticking some short lengths of sticky tape randomly on top of each other and holding the sticky patch in front of the screen. (Be careful not to let the tape stick to your screen though, as you could damage the coatings.)
« Last Edit: 05/10/2007 14:31:31 by techmind »
 

Offline techmind

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #198 on: 05/10/2007 14:44:26 »
What you need

Paper or plastic disposable cup  (paper cup will probably be a bit easier)
'Bendy' drinking straw
You might also need a bit of blu-tak or plasticine
Scissors (adult help), a skewer (adult help), or a single-hole office hole-punch may be useful too.


What you do

Make a hole in the cup, ideally that's a good fit for the straw, about half an inch (a centimetre or just over) from the top of the cup.

Thread the straw through the hole so that the bendy section sits in the hole, and the short end of the bendy-straw is inside the cup and pointing down.
(You could use a waterproof elastoplast or some waterproof glue to stick the straw to the inside of the cup if necessary.)
If the straw is not a very good fit in the hole, then use some plasticine or blu-tak to make a reasonable seal - it doesn't need to be perfect.
Hold or tape the part of the straw that is outside the cup so it is pointing downwards, and the bottom of the straw is below the bottom of the cup.

(Make sure the straw is not squashed flat anywhere)

Fill the cup with water to a level about a centimetre below the level of the hole you made.

Get someone else to hold the cup for you, or balence it on the edge of the sink/draining board.

Now slowly pour in some more water (a second cup may be useful).
(If the hole leaks too much then you may need to pour a bit faster).

What happens?
« Last Edit: 05/10/2007 14:53:24 by techmind »
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #199 on: 14/10/2007 12:05:31 »
what you need

a sunny day (could be hard in the UK right now)
a shallow glass baking dish
a mirror
water
white paper or cardboard
an assistant


what you do

Put the glass baking dish flat on the ground or a table., and put the mirror in the dish. Lean the mirror up against one side.

Turn the dish so the mirror faces the sun and add water until the dish is about half full.

Have the helper hold up the paper at the end of the dish away from the mirror and move it around slowly. Watch for the sunlight bouncing off the mirror.

What happened?

Topic link: Can i make a rainbow at home
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=10798.0
 

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #199 on: 14/10/2007 12:05:31 »

 

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