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Author Topic: What's your kitchen science?  (Read 398468 times)

Offline daveshorts

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #50 on: 02/04/2007 11:52:05 »
The above procedure will extract both DNA and proteins, so the gunk you see may not be all DNA, to get more pure DNA you need to break down the proteins. To do this you need an enzyme called a protease. fresh pineapple and kiwi juices have these, which is why they hurt to eat - they are digesting your mouth. So you could add these and keep the mixture warm for 10mins or you could just extract teh DNA from kiwi fruit.

Here is something I wrote a while back about this which you may find interesting
http://www.chaosscience.org.uk/pub/public_html//article.php?story=20050524184709373
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #51 on: 03/04/2007 03:59:06 »
Thanks Dave and Paul I am excited to try this one.. I have never done this before.. Me is very happy!!!!! YAYYYYYYYY!! I want to see DNA!!! YAYYYYYY!
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #52 on: 03/04/2007 10:20:08 »
I would not do that DNA one first, Karen. I would do Dave's kiwi fruit one then the other. Dave's is much better, i thought dave had it in the kitchen science section of the main site but can't find it!

so here is a link to the kiwi fruit one on daves own site: http://www.chaosscience.org.uk/pub/public_html//article.php?story=20040206021823942

Which is also well worth looking around.
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #53 on: 03/04/2007 10:25:09 »
The above procedure will extract both DNA and proteins, so the gunk you see may not be all DNA, to get more pure DNA you need to break down the proteins. To do this you need an enzyme called a protease. fresh pineapple and kiwi juices have these, which is why they hurt to eat - they are digesting your mouth. So you could add these and keep the mixture warm for 10mins or you could just extract teh DNA from kiwi fruit.

Here is something I wrote a while back about this which you may find interesting
http://www.chaosscience.org.uk/pub/public_html//article.php?story=20050524184709373

thanks for that, Dave. Just out of curisity, will you be adding any more dates to the chaos tour/roadshow?
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #54 on: 03/04/2007 16:48:58 »
 I will try both!! Thanks!
 

Offline daveshorts

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #55 on: 03/04/2007 19:51:07 »
thanks for that, Dave. Just out of curisity, will you be adding any more dates to the chaos tour/roadshow?

We are attempting to finalise the tour's dates fairly soon, if we raise enough money. The plan is to go to Devon, Dorset, bits of Suffolk Gloucester, amongst others.

Do you have anywhere you would want us to go?
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #56 on: 03/04/2007 21:54:28 »
What you need

A microwave
3 grapes


What you do

take one grape, with it's stem/stalk attached and put it in the microwave for 10 seconds. What happens?

OK, that was fun, but this next one is just....cool.

take the remaining two grapes, and remove the stem/stalk. place them in the microwave with the hole where the stem/stalk was facing eachother. they should be about half a centimeter apart.

now cook them for 8 to 10 seconds, but no longer than that. if you repeat this use fresh grapes.

What happens?


do not cook the grapes for longer than 10 seconds, cooking for longer has a slight chance of damaging your microwave.
please also note that the grapes will be very hot and inedible

 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #57 on: 04/04/2007 21:59:57 »
What you need

a jar with a lid
a thermometer
steel/wire wool
vinegar
a bowl

What you do

put the therrthermometer into the jar and put on the lid. Let the jar sit for about 15 minutes and then check the temperature.

Next, place the steel wool into a small bowl. Pour some vinegar onto it,  using enough to get the steel wool very wet. Squish it around a bit and then squeeze out as much vinegar as you can.
Put the wet steel wool into the jar, up against the thermometer. Again, note the temperature. Put the top on the jar and leave it for five minutes.

After five minutes, check the temperature again. What do you notice?
 
Put the lid back on the jar and wait another 10 minutes. Check the temperature again. Then wait another 10 minutes and check again.

What is happening to the temperature?
What has happened to teh steel wool?
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #58 on: 09/04/2007 09:42:39 »
What you need

an egg
a tall glass
salt
water


What you do

half fill the glass with water, then add enough salt to saturate the water, 4 to 6 spoonfulls should do. wait a minute or two

then carefully fill the glass with more water, pouring gently down the side of the glass is best as you do not want the two layers of water to mix.

gently put the egg in to the top of the glass and let go.

what happens?
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #59 on: 09/04/2007 10:11:47 »
kids love science and ice cream so why not do both! Sure most of us will have done this before but i thought it worth posting anyway.

What you need

ice cubes
salt
one large glass bowl
one smaller glass bowl
tea towel
double cream (from memory i think it's double cream)
milk


what you do

mix a tablespoon of cream with two of milk in the small bowl. put a lyer of ice cubes in the large bowl and sprinkle salt over the ice cubes.

put the small bowl in the middle of the large bown and pack more layers of salt ice cubes around it until the ice is as high as the bowl.

cover the bowls with the tea towel and leave for one hour, stirring every five minutes. you can add cocoa powder at the initial stage for chocolate ice cream.

one hour later, eat the ice cream

if you bowls are quite large them obviously you can double up the quantities of cream and milk to make more ice cream.

can someone let me know if i am right about the double cream as i will be making some at the weekend. thanks in advance.
« Last Edit: 09/04/2007 10:22:39 by paul.fr »
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #60 on: 10/04/2007 03:16:14 »
Yummm!
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #61 on: 11/04/2007 19:56:53 »
summer is coming and we may be having a bar-b-que, well this is not so much an experiment as a how to.

cook eggs on a barbque

what you need

a barbque
plastic carrier bag
water
eggs


what you do

wait until the barbque is over, spread the hot ashes/coales on the floor. the ashes must be hot and not flaming.
fill your carrier bag with water and add the eggs
hold the carrier bag on top of the hot ashes/coles and the water will boil and cook your eggs

the science angle here is why the plastic bag does not melt!
« Last Edit: 11/04/2007 19:59:08 by paul.fr »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #62 on: 12/04/2007 00:24:38 »
Self-Inflating Balloon
This is a really slow way to blow up a bunch of balloons for your birthday party but at least you won’t get out of breath.

WHAT YOU NEED:

1 tsp active dry yeast (5mL)
1/4 cup sugar (50 mL)
1 cup warm water (250 mL)
1 balloon

WHAT YOU DO :

In a 1-litre (1 quart) bottle (like a pop bottle) combine the sugar, the yeast and the warm (not hot) water. Hold your hand over the opening and shake to mix well. Blow up the balloon once or twice to pre-stretch it, then put it over the opening in the bottle, and tie it on securely with string or tape. Set the bottle into a bowl filled with very warm water, and go away for about an hour. When you return, the balloon will be partly inflated. Leave it alone and see how big it gets.

 

Offline Seany

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #63 on: 12/04/2007 17:20:26 »
What you need

A Film Canister
Baking Powder
Vinegar

What to do

Put a fair amount of baking powder into the film canister

Put a fair amount of vinegar in, and put the lid on the container real fast!

Stand back about 5 metres.

What happens?
« Last Edit: 12/04/2007 17:44:10 by Seany »
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #64 on: 12/04/2007 17:39:42 »
nice one sean. by film container you mean the little container to take your camera film to be processed in. just in case anyone was wondering.
 

Offline Seany

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #65 on: 12/04/2007 17:42:30 »
Yah, I don't know what they're called..

EDIT: Oh its called a film canister!
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #66 on: 13/04/2007 18:24:04 »
what you need

2-liter plastic soda bottle
a ten pence piece, or whatever coinage you use that is the size of the bottle top
Water


what you do


Place the empty uncapped bottle in the freezer for 10 minutes. Dip the coin in water.

Remove the bottle from the freezer and immediately place the wet coin on the top of the open bottle.

what happens?

 

Offline Seany

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #67 on: 13/04/2007 21:06:24 »
Hmm.. I'm not sure of that experiment. At the beginning, is the coin bigger (cannot go in the hole), equal to (still cannot go in the hole) or smaller than the hole (can go in the hole)?
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #68 on: 13/04/2007 21:31:15 »
Hmm.. I'm not sure of that experiment. At the beginning, is the coin bigger (cannot go in the hole), equal to (still cannot go in the hole) or smaller than the hole (can go in the hole)?

you need a coin the same size as the mouth of the bottle, so its sits nicely on the "hole"  ;D does not hang over or fall in.
 

Offline Seany

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #69 on: 13/04/2007 21:55:56 »
Ohh! Ok. And great, your on 1000 posts ;D Just couldn't help realising. :P

Ok.. So the outcome of the result would be.... Ugh I'm not sure!?

Putting the bottle in a freezer, would make the hole that little bit smaller, and then putting a "wet" coin would.. Oh I'm stuck! Oh well, I bet either way the result is that the coin falls into the hole. But I'm not sure why..
 

paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #70 on: 13/04/2007 21:58:06 »
Putting the bottle in a freezer, would make the hole that little bit smaller, and then putting a "wet" coin would.. Oh I'm stuck! Oh well, I bet either way the result is that the coin falls into the hole. But I'm not sure why..

you have to try it to find out...oh and your conclusion is wrong  [B)]
 

Offline Seany

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #71 on: 13/04/2007 21:59:27 »
Oh.. Does the coin just miraculously POP and fly out? :P

Well.. I'm once again lazy to do this experiment. :D Will look on the web! :P
 

Offline Seany

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #72 on: 13/04/2007 22:00:44 »
Ohh wait! I've read this in a book somewhere!!! This is the one where the coin tilts slightly.. and then goes down.. then goes up slightly.. then goes down.. and it makes a noise.. right?
 

Offline Seany

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #73 on: 13/04/2007 22:03:10 »
Ah, I've just found it on the internet. But I'm confused about one thing..

"When removed from the freezer, the cold air inside the bottle expands and tries to rush out of the bottle. This air flow causes the coin to move!"

Why does the coin need to be wet?
 

Offline Seany

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #74 on: 13/04/2007 22:06:38 »
Spikes on a String

What you'll need

2 plastic cups
6 teaspoons of baking soda
1 foot length of string
4 cups of water
Spoon

Method

1. Fill each cup with 2 cups of water.

2. Put 3 teaspoons of baking soda in each cup and stir carefully.

3. Put one end of the string in each cup and let it sit for 1-2 days.


Soon, you will see the little spikes on the string. The water travels through the string and brings some of the baking soda with it, which creates the spikes.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #74 on: 13/04/2007 22:06:38 »

 

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