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Author Topic: Are these 3 sure ways to move electrons to higher shell levels  (Read 749 times)

Offline Nicholas Lee

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Read this statement from the internet, in which what the other ways were to move electrons to higher shells.
So can you confirm that there are 3 SOLID ways to move electrons to higher shell levels.
Here are the statements I read
" Thermal energy can also raise the electron to a higher energy state, which is what is happening in your metal salt burning experiment. The cause of excitation is the heat, and light is emitted when the electron returns to the ground state. Each metal salt has a characteristic light color that it releases. Metal salts can be incorporated into fireworks to give them color. In addition to light and heat, another way that electrons can get excited is through the direct transfer of energy that occurs when the electron collides with another atom or electron."
So thermal energy is another way, also another statement I read.

"Electrons can also be excited by electrical excitation, where the original electron absorbs the energy of another, energetic electron. The simplest method is to heat the sample to a high temperature. The thermal energy produces collisions between the sample atoms causing the atom's electrons to be excited.
When an excited electron falls back to a lower energy state again, it is called electron relaxation. The resulting emission spectrum can be used to determine the composition of a material, since it is different for each element of the periodic table."
Are these guys talking about electromotive force like some of you guys on naked scientists forum told me about.
I am grateful for your help, anything helps, even a few words. :D
« Last Edit: 23/06/2016 20:44:51 by Timemachine2 »


 

Offline evan_au

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Quote from: Timemachine2
Thermal energy can also raise the electron to a higher energy state...
Electrons can also be excited by electrical excitation, where the original electron absorbs the energy of another, energetic electron. The simplest method is to heat the sample to a high temperature.
I only count 2 methods there, both of which involve raising the temperature significantly.

So if you sit your patient on TNT, it will raise the energy of some of their electrons.
If you want to raise the energy of all their electrons, you would need to use an atomic bomb.

Both methods will destroy the medical imaging equipment, and any images they may have collected.

Unfortunately, the atomic bomb will turn the patient into a plasma, which is opaque at all frequencies.

Neither method could be described as a "non-invasive procedure".
« Last Edit: 24/06/2016 12:41:19 by evan_au »
 
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Offline jeffreyH

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Sooo funny. I was crying.
 

Offline hamdani yusuf

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Read this statement from the internet, in which what the other ways were to move electrons to higher shells.
So can you confirm that there are 3 SOLID ways to move electrons to higher shell levels.
Here are the statements I read
" Thermal energy can also raise the electron to a higher energy state, which is what is happening in your metal salt burning experiment. The cause of excitation is the heat, and light is emitted when the electron returns to the ground state. Each metal salt has a characteristic light color that it releases. Metal salts can be incorporated into fireworks to give them color. In addition to light and heat, another way that electrons can get excited is through the direct transfer of energy that occurs when the electron collides with another atom or electron."
So thermal energy is another way, also another statement I read.

"Electrons can also be excited by electrical excitation, where the original electron absorbs the energy of another, energetic electron. The simplest method is to heat the sample to a high temperature. The thermal energy produces collisions between the sample atoms causing the atom's electrons to be excited.
When an excited electron falls back to a lower energy state again, it is called electron relaxation. The resulting emission spectrum can be used to determine the composition of a material, since it is different for each element of the periodic table."
Are these guys talking about electromotive force like some of you guys on naked scientists forum told me about.
I am grateful for your help, anything helps, even a few words. :D
Which is the first, second, and third "solid" way in the statements above? Why are they called solid?
Are there another ways that are not solid?
What about microwave excited discharge lamp?
 
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Offline Nicholas Lee

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Does the electron in the ground state in human tissue, and in tissue in transparent animals reside in the exact same location?

Or is the electron in the ground state in the transparent animals, it is in the ground state, but in a higher shell level, like shell level 2.
That is why transmission occurs because the electron is in a different higher shell level, and has a different electron voltage requirement to light, because it is far away from the nucleus.
Or is this wrong
Or is the electron in the ground state in the opaque human tissue, in the EXACT same place as the electron in the ground state in the transparent animals.
Its just that the energy levels are different, and that the electrons in the transparent animals tissue transmission all visible light.
Animals like the glass frog, jelly fish, and the fish that's eyes are inside its transparent head, so it can see clearer.
I am grateful for your help, anything helps even a few words. :D
 

Offline Nicholas Lee

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So if there are electron energy level in transparent animals like glass frog, Barreleye fish, and jelly fish, that transmission light.?

So if the energy levels in human tissue were the same would human skin, and bone be transparant, translucent.
Would it be safe to change the energy levels of the electron in human tissue( if it were possible).
Or is there something keeping these animals safe from the electron energy levels change, for visible light to transmission through their tissue.
The barreleye (Macropinna microstoma) has extremely light-sensitive eyes that can rotate within a transparent, fluid-filled shield on its head.
There is even a crab creature that has pincers that are transparent, and the pincers are just as dense as human bone you could say.
I am grateful for your help, anything helps even a few words. :D
 

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