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Author Topic: What does the Plank length mean?  (Read 274 times)

Offline jerrygg38

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What does the Plank length mean?
« on: 02/07/2016 21:40:17 »
What does the Plank length mean?
   As I was referred to the Plank length by Jeffery H in a previous discussion, I also looked at the general relativity possibilities in the internet discussions. Some scientists see a universe of three dimensions and Einstein allowed for this possibility in his theory. Other scientists see very complex multi-dimensional possibilities. As an EE who studies physics from the proposition that the universe is an Engineering marvel and not a mathematicians complexity. Thus the simple solution in my opinion is the correct solution. This means that at the big bang the entire universe existed in a small volume. Beyond this volume nothing of any importance existed that affects us. Thus empty space beyond our small volume is meaningless.
  The universe expanded and the empty space filled up with our gravitational waves and electromagnetic waves. Einsteinís space time would only involve the properties of the waves. The initial explosion at an initial center point produced a sphere of mini black holes which exploded as well. The result was a spherical plane and a wave which extended outward to twice the radius of the present visible universe. Thus the entire universe is a perfect sphere 27.56 billion light years in radius.
   As I see it protons, electrons, and neutrons and sub-particle radiate mass/energy in the form of spherical waves. This is dark energy. Thus the early protons had much more mass than the present day protons. Since the gravitational energy is spherical and very low energy level, it is not easy to measure except as see from rotating black holes. We pick up the radiated energy. We do not pick up any interactions of the high masses with properties of space itself. Space is but a measurement.
  This does not say that Einsteinís work is wrong as such. It is just that the waves themselves are what curves and shrinks. Now what does the plank distance mean?
   Lp = [hG/2 pi C3]0.5 = 1.61605E-35 meters
  As I see it, photons jump between gravitational field lines. Thus each wave has to be an exact multiple of the Plank length. That is easy to accomplish. At the same time the spherical gravitational waves must jump as well. The equivalent mass of an individual grav. Wave is 1.566E-72Kg. As a wave jumps a tiny space it pushes the next wave and this extends up to the radius of the universe from our spherical plane of existence. The question is how big a jump occurred. It may be possible that each wave flowing out of the proton or electron only jumped the plank distance. This causes the universe to expand and at the same time produces the gravitational forces. Thus the entire wave pushes back upon the proton and of course the Earth itself. Any other ideas as to the meaning of the Plank length?


 

Online jeffreyH

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Re: What does the Plank length mean?
« Reply #1 on: 03/07/2016 05:39:34 »
I have a problem with your view of particle mass and gravitation. To say that particles were heavier in the past requires corroboration via observation and experiment. Plus you need to consider what a proton is composed of. The quark masses are very small and most of the mass is made up from internal kinetic and binding energy. A loss of quark mass, since the contributions are small may not look as though it would matter. It may well have a significant impact of the behavior of nucleons. Which would be bad.
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: What does the Plank length mean?
« Reply #2 on: 03/07/2016 13:49:40 »
I have a problem with your view of particle mass and gravitation. To say that particles were heavier in the past requires corroboration via observation and experiment. Plus you need to consider what a proton is composed of. The quark masses are very small and most of the mass is made up from internal kinetic and binding energy. A loss of quark mass, since the contributions are small may not look as though it would matter. It may well have a significant impact of the behavior of nucleons. Which would be bad.

It is difficult to measure the loss of mass of the proton and sub-particle therein because the loss occurs over 15.78 billion years and is common mode. As the proton loses mass this is converted into dark energy and the universe expands. We then get an exponential decay and the size of the proton increases as well. Thus the proton with respect to the universe looks the same a billion years ago as it does today. During that time the ruler has expanded and the time clock slows. Of course right after big bang there was a non-linear period but the universe today is quite linear where we exist. So we have variable space time and what we think is constant only appears constant since it will measure the same with respect to our time clock and ruler.  I chose a constant light speed because to vary the light speed leaves us with equations that have no easy meaning.
   You are considering the quark masses as being very small whereas the other masses are different forms of energy. Yet the proton as a package is merely forms of spherical and angular energy. So the loss of mass of the entire package is a loss of all types of energy within the proton. thus the proton maintains its structure and expands in time. The geometric integrity of the proton must remain the same and as you point out you cannot lose any quark mass separately from the rest of the structure otherwise the proton will fall apart. Since my dot-waves have an mass/energy of 1.566E-72kilograms and is tied to the expansion of the universe, the loss of proton mass/energy is timed to the clock and ruler of the expanding universe and this locks the proton into stability. Anyway thanks for explaining the quark mass structure of the proton. I accept QM because the results are excellent but I look at the proton as an entire package without contemplating the details within it.
 

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Re: What does the Plank length mean?
« Reply #2 on: 03/07/2016 13:49:40 »

 

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