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Author Topic: Is biological transmutation possible?  (Read 879 times)

Offline tkadm30

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Is biological transmutation possible?
« on: 10/07/2016 15:34:41 »
"It is absolutely impossible to prove a priori the impossibility of a fact." -Bergson

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Photosynthesis cannot be totally explained by chemical, hence molecular, phenomena, which have not been completely explored. There are indeed phenomena at the atomic level, such as variations in isotopic composition. However, we should consider the possibility of subatomic phenomena. These may be direct or indirect mechanism. I am inclined to say indirect and they work through the unquestionable and selective action of specific enzymes, growth hormones and other hormones. These compounds may contribute to the transmutations which were clearly shown in the course of the experiments. Nothing is simple. Results obtained with one plant cannot be extrapolated and applied to all plants. Failure will result if this point is not kept in mind. Each experiment should be performed according to a well defined procedure. In this field innovation may lead to poor results. Even a simple question of lighting, of inappropriate spectrum, may make the difference between positive and negative results. This is essentially the point I am trying to make.

http://rexresearch.com/kervran/kervran.htm

What's your thoughts?

Can living organisms creates matter by weak energy transmutations?

Is photosynthesis an evidence of creation of matter by subatomic phenomena?


 

Offline chiralSPO

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Re: Is biological transmutation possible?
« Reply #1 on: 11/07/2016 01:51:56 »
It is very well established that plants (and photosynthetic bacteria and protists) use photosynthesis to rearrange atoms from carbon dioxide and water into complex organic molecules and oxygen. This can be (and has been) shown by feeding plants isotopically labeled carbon dioxide and water (labeled hydrogen, carbon and oxygen), which are then found to be incorporated into the plant, or released as gases. There is no matter/energy conversion or any nuclear reactions involved. There is also nothing other than chemistry involved in the fixation of nitrogen, or the extraction of other elements (like phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, iron etc.) from the soil...

The methodology used to study these phenomena have become much more sensitive and much more reproducible since the research cited above (Kervran). That Kervran's observations have not been replicated, and that our understanding of photosynthesis is so much more significant now, strongly suggests that his studies were either poorly done or faked.
 
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Offline puppypower

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Re: Is biological transmutation possible?
« Reply #2 on: 11/07/2016 12:50:23 »
What also is true is, no protein will work properly without water. If you do an energy balance around the organics and enzymes of photosynthesis, one cannot close the energy balance, with the organic only assumption, since enzymatic conformational change requires the breaking of dozens of hydrogen bonds of water, which adds up to more energy, than you get.

If you follow the convention of ignoring the importance of water, but do an accurate energy balance, how do you explain the energy difference using   the organics only assumption? Some researchers think it is less taboo to postulate creating matter with the organics, then saying you need to take into consideration the water, to close the energy balance.

For example, each base on the DNA has about 20 water molecules hydrogen bonded to it. This is the equivalent of over ten times the energy of a molecule of ATP, yet only one molecule of ATP may be required to open up dozens of bases. The physical chemist will do the energy balance and wonder where does all the extra energy come from. Some people postulate quantum and sub particle affects as one way to close the energy balance.

If you know about water, water has the capacity to modulate the energy needs, which is why enzymes need water to work. Water can form what are called cooperative hydrogen bonding. These are clusters of water molecules, where each hydrogen bond added to the cooperative makes all the bonds of the cooperative stronger. The first bond to break, anywhere in the cooperative, is the strongest. Water forms a resonance structure, analogous to benzene where electrons become delocalized. The cooperatives are unique in that not only are electrons delocalized within the cluster, but also hydrogen protons become delocalized. The cooperatives allows quantum tunneling from both electrons and protons. There is plenty of places for the water to squirrel away energy and then give it back to the enzymes when they need a boost.

ATP has a secondary purpose beyond its energy to the organic. When ATP forms ADP and phosphate, a water molecule needs to be absorbed. The reaction of ATP acts like a bolt cutter, taking a cornerstone molecule of water away from the cooperative. The result is like a run in a nylon stocking; entropy surge. The ATP is like the match that lights a firecracker that then pushes the enzyme. The water then quickly reforms a new cooperative resetting the enzyme.
 

Offline tkadm30

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Re: Is biological transmutation possible?
« Reply #3 on: 25/07/2016 01:54:29 »
The phenomenon of biological transmutation is poorly understood. Water is the solvent of life; Its ability to create matter from hydrogen bonds and build proteins using complex chemical reactions are evidences of biological transmutation.

To understand the scientific nature of biological transmutation require careful examination of physical and chemical interactions of the water molecule. Hence, water activity control the synthesis of proteins. 
« Last Edit: 25/07/2016 01:58:34 by tkadm30 »
 

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Re: Is biological transmutation possible?
« Reply #3 on: 25/07/2016 01:54:29 »

 

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